How much can you really grow? Sustainability.


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In the context of eating from your garden, how much can one really grow in a basic sized house and its backyard? Assuming one had plants indoors and outdoors, can enough vegetables/fruits be grown to become dramatically less dependent on grocery stores?
 
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"become dramatically less dependent on grocery stores?"

Absolutely. It takes
little space to grow plants. How you preserve is a big issue. Climate is a big variable. Our Canada season is very short and care must be exercised as to what to grow. I grow most of my plant food and supplement from bulk food stores. The growing area must be massaged to have good soil. At first it take much effort in learning and doing. Not a job for the unambitious. Few people do it.
 
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"become dramatically less dependent on grocery stores?"

Absolutely. It takes
little space to grow plants. How you preserve is a big issue. Climate is a big variable. Our Canada season is very short and care must be exercised as to what to grow. I grow most of my plant food and supplement from bulk food stores. The growing area must be massaged to have good soil. At first it take much effort in learning and doing. Not a job for the unambitious. Few people do it.
Would you say you save half of your grocery bill from your garden? Grocery bill for how many people?

thanks for the response... currently I just have to get my soil prepared this fall for next year spring.

I want to grow a lot of food starting next spring, is it possible for me as a first time grower to pull that off?

Appreciate the info Durgan
 
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Where is your location? You don't pick up growing stuff in one year. It is learning process, trial and error to a great degree.
 
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Where is your location? You don't pick up growing stuff in one year. It is learning process, trial and error to a great degree.
I am located near Toronto in southern Ontario. Alright so I shouldn't expect much in the beginning but rather just learning?

Thanks for the response!
 

Meadowlark

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Climate can be a limiting factor...some things are not suitable for certain climates, although many work arounds are possible.

Next most important is your garden soil. It must be renewed and improved constantly...365/24/7. Crops must be rotated; soils must be reconditioned constantly.

Yes, it is very possible to become independent of grocery stores. More importantly, you and family can enjoy excellent tasting, nutritional food year around...from the same garden spot every year.

Sustainability has been a recurring annual goal of mine for many years and I'd say I'm 90% to 95% completely independent of grocery stores. That last 5% or so is what I'm limited to by climate.

I've posted many threads on here on sustainability especially as related to garden soils. You're welcome to read them to see my approach.


Go for it!!
 
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Climate can be a limiting factor...some things are not suitable for certain climates, although many work arounds are possible.

Next most important is your garden soil. It must be renewed and improved constantly...365/24/7. Crops must be rotated; soils must be reconditioned constantly.

Yes, it is very possible to become independent of grocery stores. More importantly, you and family can enjoy excellent tasting, nutritional food year around...from the same garden spot every year.

Sustainability has been a recurring annual goal of mine for many years and I'd say I'm 90% to 95% completely independent of grocery stores. That last 5% or so is what I'm limited to by climate.

I've posted many threads on here on sustainability especially as related to garden soils. You're welcome to read them to see my approach.


Go for it!!
Thanks for the response. I really got to buckle up I guess because this is no easy work. You're from East Texas right? My climate is a lot cooler than yours so I probably wouldn't be able to achieve the same amount of sustainability as you? Perhaps there are enough workarounds to make it work for me.

I tried to view your threads on sustainability but I cannot find a dedicated section just to view your authored threads...
 
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Self sustaining in food is an admirable aim. Preservation of food in the non growing season presents a challenge. Not many people do it successfully.

My methods of preserving and storing is pressure canning slurry/juice at room temperature. Dried grains at room temperature. Chickpeas, soy and lentils dried. Potatoes, garlic, onions fresh while they last. I keep much dried grains in covered pails, wheat, flax, corn, almonds,sunflower seeds, and some others mostly from a bulk food store. Tempeh is my main protean source.

I play with dehydrating but find it not worth the effort.

Fresh produce in season but this is a minor amount and is available about four months.

My thrust is growing is essential but preservation is probably a bigger issue.
 

Edward Sean

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Self sustaining in food is an admirable aim. Preservation of food in the non growing season presents a challenge. Not many people do it successfully.

My methods of preserving and storing is pressure canning slurry/juice at room temperature. Dried grains at room temperature. Chickpeas, soy and lentils dried. Potatoes, garlic, onions fresh while they last. I keep much dried grains in covered pails, wheat, flax, corn, almonds,sunflower seeds, and some others mostly from a bulk food store. Tempeh is my main protean source.

I play with dehydrating but find it not worth the effort.

Fresh produce in season but this is a minor amount and is available about four months.

My thrust is growing is essential but preservation is probably a bigger issue.
Why do you think that dehydrating is not worth doing?
 
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My biggest issue is produce sticking to the dehydrating pan. It takes too much time for a reasonable output. Mind you I only do plant produce. It is probably productive for meat. I have made pemmican but use so little that I no longer produce it.
 
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