Learning how to make stained glass windows

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zigs

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Very cool! Do you mark the glass off a stenciled drawing? How do you trim the glass?
I usually start with a tracing paper drawing and build up from that, but I have tried using templates recently :)

I use a glass cutter, then trim with Grozing pliers, also known as American pliers. You can nibble the glass to mm tolerances with them :)
 
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I usually start with a tracing paper drawing and build up from that, but I have tried using templates recently :)

I use a glass cutter, then trim with Grozing pliers, also known as American pliers. You can nibble the glass to mm tolerances with them :)
I would have thought you sanded them. I suppose it is soft. We sometimes use the blue belts on a sander for glass edging. I believe it is aluminum oxide grit paper. You can frost clear glass with it. We sometimes get asked to cut patterns on our plotters for people to etch glass with acid cream. Interesting art. Having no talent myself I can only stare!o_O
 

zigs

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Glass is 7 on the hardness scale and steel is only 6.5 so the steel does wear after a few years.

Now that's useful, could use that to frost 4mm float glass :)
 
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There exists a studio here in town that is run by a lady named Niki who is super nice and super talented. Becky and I bought a stained glass window for the Chapel where and when we got married. It is just fascinating to me how artists create. I would have a pile of mess and bleeding fingers. Once upon a time I hired a young fellow that had me buy this software. It let him design and then print out a template. Most importantly at the time it was not very expensive. He would use flat backed caming lead and window film to create the illusion of stained glass. They even made flat backed crystals that were glued on with the UV cured glue used for repairing stone chips in automobile windshields. Pretty cool for a fake.
 
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zigs

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Only cut my wrists once since starting doing this, I was down with depression when I started and Sis thought I was trying to top myself :oops:
 

Gail_68

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Cleaned em all out now :D
Nice work Zigs...very nice ;)

We've got some right nosy neighbours around here and having vertical blinds doesn't help and as soon as the light goes on...all start viewing and I asked hubby to tan my windows with this stuff "Black out window film" and he's refused as he said it can peel in time :(
 
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Nice work Zigs...very nice ;)

We've got some right nosy neighbours around here and having vertical blinds doesn't help and as soon as the light goes on...all start viewing and I asked hubby to tan my windows with this stuff "Black out window film" and he's refused as he said it can peel in time :(
Actually I do that window film for a business. I have 2 stores. Yes the material you buy from the hardware will fail prematurely compared to what we use. Also, and more importantly, if it is dark but you can see through it, you will eventually go outside at night when the lights are on inside, and on that evening you will learn that what you thought you were doing in privacy was in fact not private at all. Light and other forms of energy flow from the high to the low, and whatever is illuminated inside will be visible to anyone out in the dark.
 
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Actually I do that window film for a business. I have 2 stores. Yes the material you buy from the hardware will fail prematurely compared to what we use. Also, and more importantly, if it is dark but you can see through it, you will eventually go outside at night when the lights are on inside, and on that evening you will learn that what you thought you were doing in privacy was in fact not private at all. Light and other forms of energy flow from the high to the low, and whatever is illuminated inside will be visible to anyone out in the dark.
I agree @DirtMechanic !! I put some on the top window upstairs, just to add a bit of colour, and the sun shines through and makes patterns in the room. I'm afraid it wouldn't stop prying eyes though if it was on the downstairs windows :cautious:

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Hi,

Lovely work zigs. :)

I'd love to have a go at stained glass work; I've had a brief look on the web for materials and found the glass rather expensive although as experience is gained cheaper glass can possibly be sourced?

I have however used lead came for the first time whilst restoring my two coach lamps. The side glass lens were falling out the crude clips having rusted away; I needed a better way to secure the glass and came up with the idea of using lead came so ordered a 2m length as an experiment.

This project took on a life of its own; I ended up virtually making new lamps in a slightly bigger size but out of aluminium. Ideally I'd have liked lens rubber seals but couldn't find anything suitable including auto windscreen seals so lead came was second choice. In order to install the lens the outer edges of the inner came were bent at right angles then once the lens were pushed home the edges were squeezed tightly against the lamp body; not perfect but a big improvement over the original fastenings. I soldered the mitred outside corners and I think once the lead and solder have weathered a bit the lamps should look OK. Both lamps only cost £3 the pair but it cost a great deal more before the lamps were finished.

Where I sit at the computer we have a small side window by the door that is screaming at me to be transformed with stained glass but at the moment it's much too cold to be playing around with bits of glass.

Kind regards, Colin.

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One of the lamps showing the loose lens.

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An original lamp with my home made lamp showing how the lead came was used. The paintwork has since been tidied and the colours match our bungalow exterior.

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When I start a project it usually ends up totally different but then I love playing around in the workshop. This shows the lamp bottom the corner holes on purpose just in case of condensation to let it drain free.

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The inside shot showing the lead came in position and painted black; I learned metal spinning during this project and spun highly polished aluminium reflectors. I enjoy tackling unusual projects.
 
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