Bunny fertilizer


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yeh Marty the cow farmer across from me does that he said the yeast in the bread is good for the cows ,can't remember why .
 
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Bunnies and birds are the only wildlife in my neighborhood. No big trees to encourage coons or squirrels. I love them though! Don't think I could ever do it with the dogs around, but my aunt and uncle used to have the wild bunnies tamed enough in their yard that they would eat right out of your hand. It was the coolest thing when we would go to visit.
 
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When I lived in NJ I had a squirrel that used to knock on my kitchen window to get his treats and if he did not get them he would go to every window in the house until someone fed him .I always wonder what happened after I sold it what the new people did .I told them about him and they thought it was cute .They were moving there from NY city so country life was appealing to them
 

j.w

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There is a restaurant not far from here out in the country called The Eatery where they have tons of free roaming bunnies all over the place. There is a resort there also called Skagit River Resort. They have little houses built for them and they feed them.

SKAGIT RIVER RESORT
The Bunny Story
At present we have between 50 and 175 bunnies, more or less, that live in harmony at Clark’s. But this wasn’t always so. Our story begins on Friday Harbor, an island in the nearby San Juan chain. Some years ago someone released a few rabbits on the island—probably pets. There were no natural predators on the island, and yes, the rabbit population exploded. The islanders called for help—anyone, come hunt these rabbits! Rudy and Tootsie, and friends, went to the island each year to help the islanders and bring back rabbit for the freezer.
LawnBunnies.jpg
About 1961 when the group of friends made the trip, Rudy decided to catch a few live rabbits to raise at home. Bob Wiley drove the car through the fields and Rudy sat on the fender with a net in his hands. It was dangerous, but they had great fun. He caught about 1/2 dozen. On the ferry ride home Rudy gave away all but three. The very next morning one rabbit was pulling fur to build a nest. Rudy and Tootsie went into rabbit raising. Here in the country, if you want to keep them safe from varmints, you usually keep them in the nice safe rabbit hutch or cage. As the rabbits multiplied, he built more hutches. Finally, the rabbits out-produced him, and he let some loose. That was the year Rudy made his garden fence rabbit-proof.
Around here, we have a lot of predators who appreciate a tasty meal of rabbit: hawks, owls, bobcats, cougar, coyote and bear. One year a bobcat came around; she took all but 11 rabbits for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Later a big old black bear paid several visits, as ornery and crazy as he could be. Our dog, Teddy always let us know when he was around. He came once about 10 p.m. and again at 4 a.m. for three nights in a row. He could smell the apples and vegetables in our utility room—and was determined to get in. During this time he destroyed the hutches and slaughtered at least half of the rabbits. The other half got away. Mr. Bear returned again -- and now he's the living room rug, but that's another story. Anyway, the bunnies that had escaped from the bear were used to being fed and housed and life outside, especially in the winter, was very hard. Most didn't survive the winter. However, some did, and since that time we have had "wild" bunnies here. Now the bunny population, sheltering under the cabins in the winter and fed day-old bread by our guests, young and old alike, is usually strong and wary enough to evade the occasional predator.
We ask that any pet you bring with you be kept on a leash when it is outside, to protect the bunnies. They are not pets, and are not willing to be picked up or cuddled. They have been known to bite a persistent youngster's hand, so please supervise your children. They do a big job around here, keeping the grass trimmed and everyone entertained!
babybun.jpg
Living as they do, wild on our premises, we are often called on by guests to come to the aid of an orphaned baby bunny or tend to an injured animal. Here's a recent patient, seemingly well on the road to recovery.
 
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AHHH HOW CUTE I throw all my veggie scrapes out by the shed to keep the bunnies from helping themselves to my garden
 
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I haven't thought about doing it lately, though this thread has just reminded me! I occasionally put their poop in the garden. I have 3 pet rabbits so I have plenty of bunny poop!

I also have pet ducks, their poop certainly makes my grass greener! :D
 
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I raise them for meat, there was a time when I had about 20 young bunnies, THAT was a lot of poop!
 
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Loved reading through this bunny thread, such cute creatures. I don't have any myself, but I do have four goats and all their poop and bedding from their shed goes straight on my garden to raise, improve and fertilize the soil. Seems to be working.
 
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When we had rabbits we used their droppings too with great results. So my vote is 'yes' for bunny poop :D
 
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LOL bring on the bunnies! What a great animal. They are cute and quiet, reqiure very little care and provide wonder soil amendments AND they taste GREAT!
 
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Look how the wheel spins :)) I have bunnies now! My brother just bought 3 Belgian rabbits from Hungary :D
 
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I was told that if the animal eats meat then you shouldnt use that animals droppings as fertilizer but if they are on a vegiterian diet then its good to go. I dont know if this is an actual fact but it makes sense. Its like a natural compost. That means that my dogs little blessings cant be used in the garden since the dry dog food has meat as an ingredient. Chicken and turkey droppings are supposed to be really good for your gardening needs too. My Grandma swears by turkey mulch for her garden.
 
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I am sometimes lazy when it comes to composting so I have been know to clean the pens straight into the garden. This is fine for bunny waste, but you have to be careful with chicken and turkey, it is much hotter.
 
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I love bunny to watch but i don't want to raise them up. I love to care my kafy (cat) and love dogs to keep as my pet but not bunny.
 
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