Large Olive tree, lots of problems!

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I bought a large (ex orchard) olive tree from a reputable company. (It’s the type that’s had all of its branches cut off so it’s all new growth)

First problem was that they sent me a different tree than what I ordered and tried to pass it off as the same so I don’t have the exact details for this one. Apparently the one I ordered was ‘damaged’ and they couldn’t send it, I’m not sure where this tree has been but I was annoyed that it didn’t seem very cared for.
The pot it’s in is unlike any others on their website (so I’m thinking maybe it wasn’t officially for sale), it had 5inch suckers shooting out of the base, had fungus on the tree/dirt - found when I cleared away all the debris and dead leaves! has been eaten alive by bugs (no bugs on it), has the signs of possible peacock spot.

I can take care of most of these issues although any advice would be great! My biggest issue is that it’s started growing mushrooms, I was planning on planting this in the ground but I don’t want to spread the problem to the rest of the garden plus I have dogs who will eat them!
How do I get rid of the mushrooms please? I’ve been pulling them out but there’s more every few days!

I did contact the company who have been unhelpful at best ‍♀️

Thanks, Kelly ☺️
 
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Greetings, welcome to the Forums.

The European Olive (Olea europea) is a remarkably tough tree. That a mature tree can survive such re-potting is exceptional.

Are you planning to plant the tree in the ground? I would recommend it highly. Any woody plant will eventually succumb to being root-bound in a container, and this tree clearly could benefit for more root area.

If you see signs of active Peacock Spot (Spilocaea oleaginea), clear away fallen foliage. In olive orchards trees are sprayed with copper compounds once or twice yearly during dry weather, but that might be a tad excessive for an ornamental specimen.

The mushrooms might be Coprinopsis atramentaria or something similar. Such Coprinoid fungi are saprophytic, not pathogenic. They will not cause plant disease. Of course myriad fungi are ever-present and essential in healthy soils. Woe be to any soil that lacks fungi.
Yes, the mushrooms of Coprinopsis are mildly toxic. They should not be eaten. Hopefully they won't pass the sniff test with your dogs. If you suspect your dogs will try to eat them anyway, just keep removing the fruiting bodies as they appear. That is all you can reasonably do.
 
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Greetings, welcome to the Forums.

The European Olive (Olea europea) is a remarkably tough tree. That a mature tree can survive such re-potting is exceptional.

Are you planning to plant the tree in the ground? I would recommend it highly. Any woody plant will eventually succumb to being root-bound in a container, and this tree clearly could benefit for more root area.

If you see signs of active Peacock Spot (Spilocaea oleaginea), clear away fallen foliage. In olive orchards trees are sprayed with copper compounds once or twice yearly during dry weather, but that might be a tad excessive for an ornamental specimen.

The mushrooms might be Coprinopsis atramentaria or something similar. Such Coprinoid fungi are saprophytic, not pathogenic. They will not cause plant disease. Of course myriad fungi are ever-present and essential in healthy soils. Woe be to any soil that lacks fungi.
Yes, the mushrooms of Coprinopsis are mildly toxic. They should not be eaten. Hopefully they won't pass the sniff test with your dogs. If you suspect your dogs will try to eat them anyway, just keep removing the fruiting bodies as they appear. That is all you can reasonably do.
Thank you very much for your reply. Yes, it will be planted in the ground. I’m not sure if it would be best to do it now or in the spring as we have very strong winds here and I don’t want it to end up wonky because there’s no way it’s coming back out of the ground to be straightened.

I did end up having to spray my previous olive tree with copper solution due to excessive leaf drop (we are in one of the wettest places in the UK, that doesn’t help) I’ve only found it in a few places so far. I’ll treat it if we have a dry week or in the spring. I did ask the company what it had been treated with but they are ignoring me! - probably because I called them out when they said there was no way to stop bugs eating their very expensive trees!!
Thanks for the ID on the mushrooms, the dogs will definitely eat them I’ll have to work something out!
 

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