Do you keep on mowing your grass, as much as you keep up with your garden?


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I can tolerate a lawn growing for a while but I can't stand weeds in my flower beds. Honestly letting grass grow a bit doesn't hurt as long as it's not long enough for neighbors to call the city on you haha.
 
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After hearing too much complaining from the husband last year about having to cut around my "crap", lawn furniture needs to be moved, cut around grill area, fire pit, raised beds, ok so there is alot in the back. I've agreed to take over the cutting this year. Havent had to start yet, but this spring I've been laying down alot of much paths in the areas hardest to get to so there is going to be less to cut in the back. In the front the flower beds are being greatly expanded as well.. again less to move and cut

I'll admit alot of the lawn is just clover and weeds. I refuse to use chemicals on it and I wont waste water on it either. My effort goes into the garden
 
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I mean a lawn is a lawn. To me it doesn't serve much purpose or function really save to be green. There's better ground cover out there that require less attention like clover and whatnot. When my mother moved into her new house years ago we pretty much decreased the size of the yards/lawns and expanded flower beds and set up a patio to cut down on having to waste time cutting grass. I mean in the long haul having a huge lawn is a waste of water, gas, money and time.
 
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I mean a lawn is a lawn. To me it doesn't serve much purpose or function really save to be green. There's better ground cover out there that require less attention like clover and whatnot. . I mean in the long haul having a huge lawn is a waste of water, gas, money and time.
I think it depends on the situation, size of garden and climate. A nice green lawn can offset the effect of the flower beds. We never water our lawn, it doesn't cost much in gas (even at our prices :D), we don't use any chemicals in the garden and this lawn, in our front garden, only takes about 20 minutes to cut with a gas powered hand mower. It also gives me some of my much needed exercise. ;)

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It's only one of eight lawns (of varying sizes) that we have so there's still a lot of mowing to do, but some of the lawns don't need mowing frequently.

The lawn may look in good condition but that's only because it has been cut. It's about 30% grass, 30% weeds and 40% moss!!
 
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See a lawn like that I don't mind since it's not very big. I was talking about like Midwest US lawn which is all grass and no flower beds. A lawn so uselessly vast that people buy riding lawn mowers just to keep them cut. Owning a riding lawn mower and mowing every 3 days is like a religion here and I just see it wasteful.
 
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We use our "lawn" to outline and define our flower beds. With about two acres of mowing (which includes the road right-of-way that we maintain) and the orchard area, we need a riding mower. For pity's sakes, we are in our 60's!
We shred (mow) the pasture three times a year using a tow-behind shredder. It helps keep the mesquite trees from taking over, and enriches the pasture with the mowed vegetation.
We just let whatever is green grow, and cut it down when it needs it. Most of our energy, and all of our harvested rainwater, goes into vegetable gardens, and secondarily, flower beds.
Bootsy, is that Lady's Mantle in the forefront of your garden, with the yellow flowers? What a lovely plant--we had some when we lived up north, but here in Texas the heat kills it. You have a perfectly lovely garden!
 
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@marlingardener Thanks for the compliment.

For pity's sakes, we are in our 60's!
That's the problem with you being youngsters ;) you get to use all these new fangled things! :D

Yes it's lady's mantle (alchemilla molis) and apart from being an attractive plant with green flowers, it is perfect for my wife's flower arranging hobby.
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It's not necessary to have a riot of colour to have a good looking flower bed (although we do have great colours elsewhere in the garden) and it's a matter of using size and height to create interest for the viewer.

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Other colours appear in the same beds at different times of the year.

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I have a lawn on the terrace a small strip I could say. I have planted Bermuda Grass which does not need mowing. I do not replant either. I just rake it once a year and sprinkle some fresh soil over it.



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We use our "lawn" to outline and define our flower beds. With about two acres of mowing (which includes the road right-of-way that we maintain) and the orchard area, we need a riding mower. For pity's sakes, we are in our 60's!
I'm in my sixties also, and love my rider, and that's one of the reasons I have one, but not the only one either. I hook the dump trailer to it, and it becomes my all around heavy hauler. Every other year I get 6-8 yards of mulch delivered, and a wheelbarrow just ain't happening with these old abused bones. Another reason I prefer a rider is the amount of time I save mowing, and I absolutely hate the wheel marks a push mower leaves. It's a much more natural look when cut with a lawn tractor. Plus it's fun to drive, and no one is trying to cut me off at every turn.:)
 
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When we first moved here we got a riding mower. I'd never used one before, but had to learn. I was terrified! First I thought it would turn over, then I thought I'd break it, and then I imagined all sorts of mayhem I could create. Neighbors used to go by and then phone later to tell me they'd never seen a woman look that scared. Gradually I got more used to it, but never confident of my driving/mowing skills. I mow slowly and carefully, and do a lot of praying!:unsure:
 
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I have a solar powered lawn mower that does grass cutting by itself. I just need to get it outside and the work will be done within minutes. I don't cut it by myself anymore. That gives me time to go weed in the garden. Now it is rain season which forces me to attend to my crops daily.
 
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We tend to go at least once per week in my household. We run a little gardening and lawn service in and around the neighborhood so we pretty much usually have the lawn mower out at any given time. We don't have a particular day but mostly during the week when we are just sitting out or coming back in from a job we would just run the mower over it. Weeding is kind of different and we really schedule some time for that and it is definitely not as often as mowing. I enjoying weeding but I'm a hands on guy so that comes with a lot back aches done too often.
 
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As we're approaching the end of the year our garden is coming into it's winter tidy up. This keeps us busy all through the winter. Cutting back the shrubs and perennials, tidying trees, raking leaves (some trees hang on to their leaves through January), weeding, digging, composting, collecting horse manure and digging it in, cutting back dead branches on trees, winter pruning the fruit trees (plums and cherries have summer pruning), repairing supports, doing winter sowing, making our winter hanging baskets, cleaning pots and containers - and throughout all this we are still mowing - if the grass isn't too soggy or if it's not frosted.

This is also the time we do our planning of our garden for next year and working out our propagation schedule - we propagate well over 1,000 plants for sale for charity each year.
 
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@Bootsy I don't think you guys get winter blues at all. I don't think you have time for it with all that good stuff going on for your lawn and plants as well. We also have some nice fruit trees around the backyard but we are not as intense as you guys. I love the charity idea. We give away a few young plants (flowers and fruits) to friends and neighbors but it's nothing compared to the good works you do.
 
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@arthnel many thanks for your kind words. (y) As Septuagenarians we find it gets a little more difficult each year but it's very rewarding.

As we tend to be a nation of gardeners on this side of the 'pond' it's quite common to open our gardens for charity. People come round, on set days, to view other peoples' gardens - for a small fee. We take advantage of this and propagate plants and sell them.

Just some of our plants for sale.
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We are fortunate to have a lot of helpers for the event so we sell home made cakes and tea/coffee and have lots of entertainment. If the weather is good some people spend half, or even a whole day here, wandering around the garden, chatting with others, buying plants, watching the entertainment and eating loads of cake. We also have some crafts for sale and a book stall.

This year, in the nine hours we were open (day and a half) we had 450 visitors. Some of them coming from all over the country (Zigs travels a few hundred miles each time). We only charge £1 ($1.50) entry fee but raised over $6,000 this year.
 
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Mowing is some thing I do only if there no clover flowers, most of the time its once a week from spring to fall, but its Dec. and I'm still mowing my lawn, last year every thing was covered in snow, I'm liking the warmer weather, saves on my heating bill but my plants need the winter rest.
 
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We only had a small portion of lawn in our garden in my home country that is why there is no need in mowing the grass. We had a gardener who is helping my mom to take care of our garden and he is just cutting the grass weekly at the same time removing the weeds in the lawn.
 
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Hey @Bootsy Thanks so much for sharing the pictures. WOW!...It all looks very organized and well supported. I look at the variety of plants and I see the good, hard work put in that would surely make this an event to look forward to each year. Truly inspirational. Keep up the great work you guys are doing. I'll be sure to watch out for more lovely pictures like those and of your gardens. Many thanks again.
 
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