Chuck - Hot Pepper questions


Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Chuck,

Do hot peppers produce indefinitely (until a freeze) or do they produce on a cycle based on length of day? I've tried to google this but haven't been able to find anything definitive.

I ask for a number of reasons - a few hot pepper plants were purchased late in the spring, they were seriously root-bound and lanky - they are growing but have only one or two peppers each.

Also, I just ordered Carolina Reaper and Ghost pepper seeds from Pepper Joe's - do I need to wait till next spring to start them, and, if so, how should I store them until then.

Thanks again, sir!

PS. I kinda like Texas, a little, for those concerned :cool:
 
Last edited:
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,465
Reaction score
3,604
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Chuck,

Do hot peppers produce indefinitely (until a freeze) or do they produce on a cycle based on length of day? I've tried to google this but haven't been able to find anything definitive.

I ask for a number of reasons - a few hot pepper plants were purchased late in the spring, they were seriously root-bound and lanky - they are growing but have only one or two peppers each.

Also, I just ordered Carolina Reaper and Ghost pepper seeds from Pepper Joe's - do I need to wait till next spring to start them, and, if so, how should I store them until then.

Thanks again, sir!

PS. I kinda like Texas, a little, for those concerned :cool:
Peppers are sort of like trees. They go dormant and stop producing if the conditions are right. Most gardeners treat peppers as annuals but they are really perennials and some peppers like the Chilipetin will live and produce for years. Peppers grow and produce by light intensity not by length of day. Hot peppers need high light intensity so it would be better if you waited to plant the Reaper and Ghost seeds but not imperative that you wait if you can keep them from freezing. They will just go dormant like a tree does but this doesn't mean that you can forget about them. They must still be fed and watered and cared for. Reapers and Ghost peppers are about 150 day peppers so if you planted them now by November you should be getting a few peppers but the light intensity will be dropping so production will be limited but if proper care is maintained they will overwinter and begin flowering in the spring much earlier than if you planted seeds in the spring. As far as the lanky root bound peppers you can plant them deep just like you do tomatoes. Just repot them into a larger pot and fertilize them. As for storing seeds, all I do is put them in a paper envelope and keep them in a dry warm place.
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Thank you again, Chuck.

I never knew that tomatoes or peppers can be planted deep - maybe I will give that a try though the current levels of humidity have me hibernating in my air-conditioned cave.

What is your opinion of how well peppers tolerate the clay soil I have here in Cedar Creek? Would you plant in ground or stick to containers with potting soil and some sand mixed in?
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,465
Reaction score
3,604
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Thank you again, Chuck.

I never knew that tomatoes or peppers can be planted deep - maybe I will give that a try though the current levels of humidity have me hibernating in my air-conditioned cave.

What is your opinion of how well peppers tolerate the clay soil I have here in Cedar Creek? Would you plant in ground or stick to containers with potting soil and some sand mixed in?
My mom and dad had a truck/roadside stand garden between Austin and Manor Texas. Not all that far from you by Texas standards. Heavy black clay soils. We grew all kinds of peppers. The actual soil is difficult to manually work but it will grow anything. Way back then all we had was a tractor with different mold board plows and a cultivator, long before tillers were invented. As far as in the ground vs container gardening goes, I think that in the ground gardening is better production wise. Having said that when one reaches 70+ years old in the ground gardening becomes physically difficult. I have started transitioning to container gardening. Next year probably all I will grow in the ground are row crops. Tomatoes and peppers in containers of which I am scrounging around for now.
The soil I will use in the containers will be a mixture of my garden soil, good potting soil and homemade compost. I guess if you added sand to potting soil it would be ok but when you add sand to clay it makes bricks. Never add sand to clay soils. Add compost or fine mulch
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Thank you, Chuck, you are very generous with your knowledge. I wish I had some of that black clay soil here - this is brown mud-pie clay.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,465
Reaction score
3,604
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Thank you, Chuck, you are very generous with your knowledge. I wish I had some of that black clay soil here - this is brown mud-pie clay.
It is basically the same soil. At Austin, the western most beginning of the black clay soil, the further east you go the lighter in color the soil becomes until in far east Texas is become a reddish color. That Austin soil is black mud-pie clay. When I was a little kid I would make mud and roll that mud into a round ball and let it dry. After drying it became a round rock, literally. I then used these round rocks in my slingshot to shoot Grackles that forever kept trying to eat our garden. I am still a good shot with a slingshot but haven't made any ammo for decades and decades. I still have a slingshot and shoot squirrels with it. It's called a WristRocket and is much better than my old homemade, red inner tube, forked stick slingshot.
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
HAHAHAHAH I had a wrist rocket as a kid, back east! We used to shoot ball bearings with it - extremely dangerous "toy."

I will find some 5-gallon buckets and work up some soil per your specification and transplant the leggy peppers, as soon as I can work up the courage to face the humidity...
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,465
Reaction score
3,604
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
HAHAHAHAH I had a wrist rocket as a kid, back east! We used to shoot ball bearings with it - extremely dangerous "toy."

I will find some 5-gallon buckets and work up some soil per your specification and transplant the leggy peppers, as soon as I can work up the courage to face the humidity...
Ah, the lovely Texas humidity. On the weather this morning it was at 74%. We are going to break 100F for the first time this year this week.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,465
Reaction score
3,604
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
My protected chillies fruit all year round, albeit much slower in winter.
That's because of lower light intensity. Where I live it is the same as you in the winter, even in a heated greenhouse. But the summers here are perfect for peppers if one can keep them watered. This year was a pitiful year for tomatoes here but it will be an outstanding year for peppers. Many of my plants are already loaded and the best growing time is still yet to come.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
3,817
Reaction score
3,475
Location
Birmingham Alabama
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
To what zones are these peppers hardy? I am USDA 8a. I have a sunny bed my wife just evacuated, and I believe I will grow peppers there.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,465
Reaction score
3,604
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
To what zones are these peppers hardy? I am USDA 8a. I have a sunny bed my wife just evacuated, and I believe I will grow peppers there.
I am in 8b and the first freeze here is about the last of November on average.
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Chuck - I bought some 7-gallon fabric containers - I was thinking of 2-plants in each container though I know one each would be better. Do you have a brand of compost that might be available at Lowe's that you might recommend?

I got my seeds from Pepper Joe's too, and a free sample 2-small dried Carolina Reaper pods. I'm going to add them to my next batch of habanero hot sauce! (y)
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,465
Reaction score
3,604
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Chuck - I bought some 7-gallon fabric containers - I was thinking of 2-plants in each container though I know one each would be better. Do you have a brand of compost that might be available at Lowe's that you might recommend?

I got my seeds from Pepper Joe's too, and a free sample 2-small dried Carolina Reaper pods. I'm going to add them to my next batch of habanero hot sauce! (y)
I think all they sell at Lowes is Scotts and Miracle Grow stuff. Miracale Grow has come out with an OMRI rated soil/compost so it might be alright. Just make sure it has OMRI on the bag. I have never used the GroBags. The diameter of the filled bag is what is important as peppers don't have the same type of root system a tomato does but if the plants are not supposed to get big like a tomato 2 plants should do OK. Make sure you save the seeds from the reaper pods. PJ's has good stuff.
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
The dried pods are oven dried so the seeds are dead, dead, dead :(

But I have two packages of Carolina Reaper seeds (+/-20 total) and one of Red Scotch Bonnets (+/- 20) so I should be set for next spring, plus any I get from however many peppers my current plants produce.

This morning's hot sauce is nice - comes on slow and then turns into lava! :D

Not really, it is hot, but real nice!
 

DrMike27

Trust me...I’m a doctor.
Joined
May 14, 2019
Messages
48
Reaction score
19
Location
Phoenix
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United States
That's because of lower light intensity. Where I live it is the same as you in the winter, even in a heated greenhouse. But the summers here are perfect for peppers if one can keep them watered. This year was a pitiful year for tomatoes here but it will be an outstanding year for peppers. Many of my plants are already loaded and the best growing time is still yet to come.
I can’t agree more with the light intensity affecting fruit growth. My only holdover from apartment to house living is my Serrano plant that I grew from seed. I have it set up on the west side of my shed and right underneath my AC outflow pipe to catch the water drainage from my AC unit (free drip system!). I noticed when I pulled out the planter slightly so it gets more morning sun that the fruits absolutely exploded. I was originally trying to protect it from getting sunburned, but it seems to have adapted quite nicely and I don’t do anything to it except an occasional pruning. Get consistent production from April-November/December and then dormant from December-March-ish. Funny thing though: The last two years they have all been red peppers, and this year they are all green. Anyone have any idea about why that is?
 

Attachments

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,465
Reaction score
3,604
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
I can’t agree more with the light intensity affecting fruit growth. My only holdover from apartment to house living is my Serrano plant that I grew from seed. I have it set up on the west side of my shed and right underneath my AC outflow pipe to catch the water drainage from my AC unit (free drip system!). I noticed when I pulled out the planter slightly so it gets more morning sun that the fruits absolutely exploded. I was originally trying to protect it from getting sunburned, but it seems to have adapted quite nicely and I don’t do anything to it except an occasional pruning. Get consistent production from April-November/December and then dormant from December-March-ish. Funny thing though: The last two years they have all been red peppers, and this year they are all green. Anyone have any idea about why that is?
All peppers start out green then turn to their appropriate color when mature. You just missed seeing the green stage.

BTW your plant is getting way too much water. See the lack of foliage, the leaf margins browning and leaves yellowing? It only needs a good soaking about every 7-10 days. I am surprised it doesn't have root rot yet. Fertilize it and gradually move it into full sun.
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads

July 2019 Photo of the Month - Flowers 11
so hot 22
June 2019 Photo of the Month - Voting Time! 0
MANURE Hot/COLD AND LIQUID. 7
Happy Birthday Chuck! 9
It's Chuck's Birthday 22
I like Chuck 26
Rest in Peace, Chuck Berry. 4

Top