Winter gardening questions


Joined
Oct 14, 2021
Messages
61
Reaction score
26
Location
New York
Country
United States
I am attempting to keep carrots in my bed for the winter. It gets below zero degrees by -20 sometimes more(or less however to correctly say what I mean). Is it it a good idea? Is it possible?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 5, 2020
Messages
200
Reaction score
79
Location
Tri Cities, WA (Columbia Basin)
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
United States
We never do that. It's uncomfortable and stains the sheets. :D But seriously, I hear they can get woody. Some people apparently cut off the tops and layer them in damp sand in the cool place. We just blanch and freeze them ready for use. Didn't grow any this year, till have plenty from last year when they went ballistic.
 
Joined
Oct 14, 2021
Messages
61
Reaction score
26
Location
New York
Country
United States
We never do that. It's uncomfortable and stains the sheets. :D But seriously, I hear they can get woody. Some people apparently cut off the tops and layer them in damp sand in the cool place. We just blanch and freeze them ready for use. Didn't grow any this year, till have plenty from last year when they went ballistic.
Wow. Ok got it. I am more than likely going to experiment with a minimal amount in the bed. I read online the colder it gets the sweeter the carrots taste.
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2020
Messages
200
Reaction score
79
Location
Tri Cities, WA (Columbia Basin)
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
United States
My Dad always left his parsnips in the ground until after the first frost and he claimed they got better. They are closely related to carrots. In fact I read somewhere that carrots were developed from parsnips, but DK if that is true. Going to try that this year with our first small crop of parsnips. But not leaving them in the ground longer than that. I have found that the odd carrot or two that got left too long did get woody inedible cores. But I think that maybe just getting too mature rather than just cold or frost. There seems to be a point beyond which they are not so good that varies with the variety. Obviously they are sweeter and more tender when they are younger. Commercial growers always pull them and store them in long low barn like buildings like potatoes around here. DK the details though, but you can bet they do what gives the best product to sell. You are probably on the right track by experiementing with a small batch.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 5, 2020
Messages
144
Reaction score
65
Location
Northeast Ohio
Hardiness Zone
7
Country
United States
The woodyness in my estimate is from maturity. Carrots are best picked before flowering. I have lots and lots of wild carrots growing in my area, they taste ok but are too woody.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top