What's Looking Good in May


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I got nuttin , magnolias gone ny and dogwood didn't flower this year
 
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I'm not sure how to upload pics here, but here's the link to my garden journal entry for May. Lots of pics!

That entry was done really more at the end of April. I now have strawberries (a few), flowers on all my tomato plants, broccoli, and some serious growth in my potatoes.

I thought I had killed my spinach with the heat, but it has come back. We shall see how long it lasts. I'm also eager to see what happens with the broccoli. I've never grown it before and one plant already tried to flower. Ugh. I cut it back and am hoping it recovers without a lot of affect on the flavor.
 
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It's one of the most beautiful lilac bushes I've ever seen!:love: There are a few of them here too, I'll try to take a picture of them tomorrow.
I live on the Lilac Bush Street near the Lilac Bush Square. As you can guess, many people here want to grow lilacs:)
 
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10 days off winter here so not much blooming. Green is good. I have tided up my rubbish bin area and very pleased with it!!!! Not really photo material though. As always I am on this forum in the wee hours of the morning with my insomnia so too dark to go looking for a nice shot. There is a pretty clematis in a planter though.
 
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I'll have to start taking some photos - should have snapped one of the bee balm where I was working this morning. Maybe if there's enough light out after the rain clears up I can look around for something pretty worth posting. Don't think I had a flower today on the passion vine, but the rose of Sharon opened and I have a rose coming in on the new bush.
 
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That is a huge freaking lilac bush.

I haven't taken many garden photos this year yet; mind you we're just barely starting our growing season. Freeze/frost predicted for Tuesday night-Wednesday morning so I'm holding off on planting veggies (except for my asparagus, which is perennial, just in its second year and currently the tallest ferns are 3' tall and branching out all over the place.)

Two weekends ago I dug an 8x4' pond; the deepest part is maybe 30 inches. It still needs LOTS of work! And lots more plants. And rocks. Lots more rocks. :D
pond in progress.jpg
 
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May is the month here in most part of India for the may flower tree to show off. The botanical name is Royal Poinciana. Thee trees dot the landscape on highways and is a riot of colour both red and orange. This tree brings in happy news for kids as the schools close to open only in June.


800px-Royal_Poinciana.jpg


Image credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Royal_Poinciana.jpg

The other flowering tree is Peltophorum which can be seen on highways and byways as well. I have a tree growing just outside my compound


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The roads get strewn with petals and that again is a sight for sore eyes.
 
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Thanks.

That Cistus has variegated leaves which form a good contrast to the flower buds. Both the variegated varieties and the plain green ones are two weeks behind their normal timing.

The flowers are a beautiful bright white and only last a day, but the plant continues to produce them for three or four months. One of the green leafed varieties is in this picture.
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It's the plant which is on the right of the picture just above the centre and protruding slightly over the lawn.

Behind and to the left of it is a lovely Euphorbia mellifera, which is slightly swamping the Cistus. The flowers smell of honey.

To the left of that, and against the fence, is a bamboo and the smaller, darker, clump in front of the bamboo is one of my favourites, Veronicastrum. By June/July the pink flowers will have grown to 6ft - 7ft tall and be covered in bees and butterflies.

In front of the Cistus is the light colour of another Euphorbia, Ascot Rainbow. The lower, pink and mauve flowers are geraniums. The tall purple flowers at the top left are Alliums and the white flowers behind them are on a golden leafed Choisyia.

The brighter, pale green flowers in the foreground are one of the varieties of Hellebores that flowers all through the winter and the green mass on the bottom right is one of the many varieties of Hebe. This one tends to grow quite low (for a Hebe) with small leaves and, in June/July is completely covered in white flowers. Most Hebes have purple flowers.

In one of the other beds the lovely coloured leaves of the Epimedium are now showing. It's an interesting plant where the flowers form before the leaves. By the time the leaves are there the flowers have finished.

This one has pink flowers and there are just the odd bits of pink left
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and this is a yellow flowered one
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The yellow flowered Saphora that is in one of the posts above has interesting large clumps of flowers. The plant has grown to about 8ft tall and looks quite spectacular when in full bloom.
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You are head over heals in love with your garden. I can see that and so am I with mine. :LOL:
 
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Plants grow very well in our climate and it seems silly not to take advantage of it. (y) It does take an awful lot of work, though!

My neighbour has a very simple garden, lawn trees and a few shrubs, and it takes him about four hours a week to keep it tidy. Our garden would take about three days a week for a professional gardener - but we don't have one. :D

We keep saying that, as we're in our seventies, we will make the garden easier to look after. Instead we have made it more complicated. This year we've made a new flower bed that is 55ft x 3.5ft. :eek:
 
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