Today's Pickings


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Meadowlark

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Toad pumpkins just in time for Halloween from HK container. Last cold snap browned some of the leaves on the plant which does not tolerate cold.

toad pumpkin HK.JPG
 

Meadowlark

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End of season blue lake pole beans are allowed to mature on the vives and then harvested for next year's seed.... or a pot of hot bean soup.

blue lake seed.JPG
 

Meadowlark

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The Japanese persimmon has a unique taste and fruit matures here in the fall. Easily frozen and best used in breads, cakes, muffins.

persimmo0n.JPG
 

Meadowlark

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Fall tomatoes are a "crap" shoot by just about any measure here in East Texas. The window for producing them is very small...only a very few days in which the plants can set fruit which will ripen in time to beat the first frost. This year it's been "7 come 11" with nice ripe tomatoes available every day now for a couple of weeks and that should continue until that killer frost hits which could come any day now.

The fruits are generally smaller and much fewer in number than in spring but the good news is minimum insect problems.

I'll keep enjoying this blessing as long as it lasts.

fal tomatoes.JPG
 
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Meadowlark

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Onions harvested last May and removed from storage today...."Today's pickings"

Still taste almost as good as fresh from the garden at 6 months of storage.

About 1/2 the original crop or about 100 pounds still remain in storage, but they will go fast with the Holidays approaching and lots of food preparation.

onions at 6 months.JPG
 
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Terrific! Pumpkin pie at Christmas?

My harvested onions are day-long, so they come out in August, & I have enough left to last until May, so I grew some short-day onions which will be harvested, all going well, in early June.
There's about 60 there, so if I only get 40 decent ones, that'll do until August.
I live at a latitude where day-long do very well, & day-short, reasonably well.
We've had some (relatively) mild weather, so they, the garlic & shallots for next year are through & growing.
Winter is mild enough not to bother onions.
 
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Fall tomatoes are a "crap" shoot by just about any measure here in East Texas. The window for producing them is very small...only a very few days in which the plants can set fruit which will ripen in time to beat the first frost. This year it's been "7 come 11" with nice ripe tomatoes available every day now for a couple of weeks and that should continue until that killer frost hits which could come any day now.

The fruits are generally smaller and much fewer in number than in spring but the good news is minimum insect problems.

I'll keep enjoying this blessing as long as it lasts.

View attachment 93394
Have you tried cutting down your early tomatoes in the summer as I've seen Greeks & Cypriots do?
They get a second crop from these when the summer heat abates.
 
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Meadowlark

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Have you tried cutting down your early tomatoes in the summer as I've seen Greeks & Cypriots do?
They get a second crop from these when the summer heat abates.
Yes, sort of... I throw some garden soil on long limbs of the "earlys" as the season ends in July and let those take root. They become my second fall crop. The window for fruit set is very narrow in fall...requires an early Sept cold front to enable fruit set which can ripen before first frost in early Nov. Got lucky this year.
 
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Meadowlark

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Winter is mild enough not to bother onions.

Short day onions here. I tried some long day once but just didn't work for me. Sometimes I will "plant" the sprouting short days harvested in May that sprout this time of year for some supplemental tasty green onions.

After literally several decades of winter grown onions here, including one winter of 8 deg. temps, it's safe to say they are fine with our winters here.
 

Meadowlark

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Spring planted peppers often produce more for me in the fall when the plants seem to undergo a rejuvenation after the long summer of heat and humidity and bloom profusely which leads to lots of peppers. We grow the large jalapeños, various bells, and a few chilies.

Picked about 5 gallons today ahead of the first frost of the year as they don't tolerate frosts well.

peppers.JPG
 

Meadowlark

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Thanksgiving harvest from the garden included (not-shown) carrots, onions, lettuce, beets and (shown below) radishes, Aspabroc(brocolinni), turnips and one humongous head of cauliflower (weighing in at 8 pounds 6 ounces).

There will be a traditional Turkey but the veggies from the garden are a highlight for me.
cauliflower thanksgiving 2022.JPG
 
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Twigs

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Thanksgiving harvest from the garden included (not-shown) carrots, onions, lettuce, beets and (shown below) radishes, Aspabroc(brocolinni), turnips and one humongous head of cauliflower (weighing in at 8 pounds 6 ounces).

There will be a traditional Turkey but the veggies from the garden are a highlight for me.
View attachment 93559
Wow! When did you plant your cauliflower and broccoli?
 
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Meadowlark

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I pretty much transplant continuously on cabbage, broc, and cauliflower starting in late August through November to enable a continuous supply of brassicas throughout the winter. I also grow brussels, but they require a long time to mature unlike the others.

I think those pictured are from some mid Sept transplants. For the first time this year, I've been using a very diluted boron drench on the brassicas which may have contributed to the size of them.
 

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