Still cold enough that plants aren't growing?


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Typically, I get started with gardening more towards the summer. However, this year I decided to start early to get a kick-start on things.

Unfortunately, it doesn't really seem like anything is kicking. It seems that my varieties of fruits such as peppers, peas, beans are thriving -- yet not really growing at all. Most of my soft-wood fruit seems to be stalled. All of them. Basically the only thing growing are hard-wood trees like my pear tree, grape vines, and blackberry canes.

It's been at least a month! They literally have the same number of leaves.

Is it possible that it is still too cold in zone 8b (Austin, TX) for growing foliage ? Are they kicking back developing roots until it gets warmer or what?

PS: Most are store-bought seedlings -- including the hard-wood trees except the trees are mostly mature already fruiting o_O.
 
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Typically, I get started with gardening more towards the summer. However, this year I decided to start early to get a kick-start on things.

Unfortunately, it doesn't really seem like anything is kicking. It seems that my varieties of fruits such as peppers, peas, beans are thriving -- yet not really growing at all. Most of my soft-wood fruit seems to be stalled. All of them. Basically the only thing growing are hard-wood trees like my pear tree, grape vines, and blackberry canes.

It's been at least a month! They literally have the same number of leaves.

Is it possible that it is still too cold in zone 8b (Austin, TX) for growing foliage ? Are they kicking back developing roots until it gets warmer or what?

PS: Most are store-bought seedlings -- including the hard-wood trees except the trees are mostly mature already fruiting o_O.
It is still a tad cool for rapid growth. Beans and tomatoes are doing and growing ok. Its too early still for peppers to do much of anything. Things will really kick off about the second week in May
 
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It is still a tad cool for rapid growth. Beans and tomatoes are doing and growing ok. Its too early still for peppers to do much of anything. Things will really kick off about the second week in May
That's very assuring and kind of what I had expected to hear. Thanks!

I've excited about the upcoming year and look forward to tons of fruits :D

Happy Growing!
 
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I'm afraid I'm not so re-assuring.
I have found, when I was over-eager, that my plants stalled with the shock of the cold, and were struggling to get going even after others' plants had whizzed past mine.
Mine never really did very well that year.
 
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I'm afraid I'm not so re-assuring.
I have found, when I was over-eager, that my plants stalled with the shock of the cold, and were struggling to get going even after others' plants had whizzed past mine.
Mine never really did very well that year.
The weather here is really weird this year. Back in mid March when I planted tomatoes it was actually warmer then than it is now as far a low temps are concerned. Now 2 or 3 days a week the low temps are in the low 50's and the highs in the mid 80's. The other 4 or 5 days the lows are in the mid to high 60's and the highs in the high 80's to low 90's. My tomatoes are doing OK but not great. I have lots of large tomatoes but very few small one's. It is just too cool for tomato set and I am loosing a large percentage of blooms because of this although the plants themselves are growing fine. If the low's would just stay in the mid to high 60's I would have a terrific crop. But I have to say that planting early has given me a lot of tomatoes and I am sure that when things begin to become normal I will have a good season. I just hope that my determinates keep flowering until good weather finally arrives. My beans don't seem to care what the weather does. I will be planting okra and peppers after this cool weather ends.
 
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The weather here is really weird this year. Back in mid March when I planted tomatoes it was actually warmer then than it is now as far a low temps are concerned. Now 2 or 3 days a week the low temps are in the low 50's and the highs in the mid 80's. The other 4 or 5 days the lows are in the mid to high 60's and the highs in the high 80's to low 90's. My tomatoes are doing OK but not great. I have lots of large tomatoes but very few small one's. It is just too cool for tomato set and I am loosing a large percentage of blooms because of this although the plants themselves are growing fine. If the low's would just stay in the mid to high 60's I would have a terrific crop. But I have to say that planting early has given me a lot of tomatoes and I am sure that when things begin to become normal I will have a good season. I just hope that my determinates keep flowering until good weather finally arrives. My beans don't seem to care what the weather does. I will be planting okra and peppers after this cool weather ends.
Never liked okra. Too much faff for too little food.
 
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Never liked okra. Too much faff for too little food.
I don't think you have ever experienced real Texas okra.. Too little food? Not in my experience. One plant will produce a heaping bunch. You can use it fried, pickled, steamed, in seafood gumbo or other dishes. One plant = pounds of excellent food if grown correctly. I think you climate is a tad bit too cool and with a little bit of not enough heat and sunshine to really appreciate it. I will be planting okra in about 2 weeks and end up with about 30 plants. Will keep you informed.
 
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I don't think you have ever experienced real Texas okra.. Too little food? Not in my experience. One plant will produce a heaping bunch. You can use it fried, pickled, steamed, in seafood gumbo or other dishes. One plant = pounds of excellent food if grown correctly. I think you climate is a tad bit too cool and with a little bit of not enough heat and sunshine to really appreciate it. I will be planting okra in about 2 weeks and end up with about 30 plants. Will keep you informed.
I meant preparing, not growing.
 
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