Question about vertical garden


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Hello, i saw this video and it got me interested on vertical gardening


I was wondering if there are online guides on how to build these walls, i am interested about the architecture and how fertilizer works automatically.
Also, i have another question about automatic watering, i can see that these walls use top bottom Drip Irrigation System, does this system works continuously non stop or do they have some type of stopper? Doesn't continuously watering kill the plant?

DIY-Drip-Irrigation-System-Garden-Watering-System-Self-Watering-Gardening-Tools-and-Equipment-Hose-Micro-Drip.jpg_Q90.jpg_.webp

Drip Irrigation System
 
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Also, i have another question about automatic watering, i can see that these walls use top bottom Drip Irrigation System, does this system works continuously non stop or do they have some type of stopper? Doesn't continuously watering kill the plant?
Water levels and frequency will depend on the plants being grown. Semi-aquatic and bog plants can take a great deal, succulents and Mediterranean herbs significantly less. Constant drip might also both leach out and over-accumulate nutrients in such a system. Many green wall designs can be watered all at one time and then allowed to drain. The drainage should go into a drain or easily emptied reservoir.

Automation can mean many different things, but it shouldn't mean letting a system run without observation, feedback and adjustment when necessary.
 
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Most of these wall systems are geared toward small fast growing things like greens, lettuce, and strawberries and run on a continuous nutrient flow.

They are also special designed systems not a stack of pots with a drip running to them.

One system commercially available is Zip Grow Farm Wall but there are several other DIY designs. Usually DIY systems use a 4" (100 mm) diameter PVC pipe with holes cut and heat formed into the pipe to hold a net cup.

A big design point with these vertical stacks is to spread out the nutrient stream so it actually hits the roots and not just run down the edge of the tube. That is where the DIY systems usually get stuck.
 
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Update from my project.
I created a felt vertical wall exactly like this video, the plants are watered by a pierced hose that passes over them horizontally


The problem i faced is that i could not remove all the soil from the two plants (because i was afraid i would break their roots) and i don't know if they can retract the water from behind the felt. The water drips inside the soil, but it doesn't fell in the center. The original idea was to remove as much soil as i could to make a soilless watering.

I can see that in the second vertical wall in Singapore, they passed the water tubing in front and not back {pic3) (i think they did this to be sure the soil is watered), what's your idea?
 

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Most of these wall systems are geared toward small fast growing things like greens, lettuce, and strawberries and run on a continuous nutrient flow.

They are also special designed systems not a stack of pots with a drip running to them.

One system commercially available is Zip Grow Farm Wall but there are several other DIY designs. Usually DIY systems use a 4" (100 mm) diameter PVC pipe with holes cut and heat formed into the pipe to hold a net cup.

A big design point with these vertical stacks is to spread out the nutrient stream so it actually hits the roots and not just run down the edge of the tube. That is where the DIY systems usually get stuck.

Thanks for your reply, i am not interested to create a vertical farm, my goal is to create a vertical green wall with ornamental plants that is self sustained or with the least human participation. Ι have heard that ornamental plants do not need much fertilizer, i don't know if that changes when you have a soilless system!
 
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The tubing is probably in front of the felt to ease maintenance. Drip irrigation can certainly irrigate plants and possibly save water, but it is not very low-maintenance. Tubes and emitters need to be adjusted, cleaned, repaired, and replaced.

I actually prefer vertical gardens which are irrigated by hose watering. The correct hose attachment, nozzle setting and water pressure should be able to quickly and gently irrigate even a fairly large wall. Of course,this is maintenance too, but It is work that allows the gardener to interact more with the plants and less with the plastic. It can also less expensive than a drip system, which will require replacement parts more often. If the person watering is paying attention, the amount of water draining off can be minimized, and what does drain off can be captured or diverted for secondary use, most likely for other in-ground or container irrigation.
Do plan for drainage, otherwise you are planning for the build-up of salts as well as unplanned leaks.

Slower growing perennials will generally require less fertilizer than annuals or crop plants, but all container plants will require some fertilizer. I water most of my container plants monthly with a complete liquid fertilizer during their growing seasons, but of course, there are many methods, formulae, and frequencies that different gardeners prefer.
 

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