New greenhouse - - soil question


mvona

The butler
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Messages
52
Reaction score
10
Location
Western New York
Hardiness Zone
5
Country
United States
Hello from Western New York State,
I will have a greenhouse for the first time next spring and I'm wondering if there are any tips you can give me regarding what type of soil to use for the containers. In fact someone might even have advice regarding what type of containers to use. The structure is only about 6' X 15'.
Thanks for any help.
Yours truly,
The butler
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
2,930
Reaction score
1,023
Location
California
Country
United States
What type of plants will you be growing in your greenhouse?

For the most part, each type of plant will want the same type of soil regardless of whether it is grown inside a greenhouse or outside. As further evidence of this, think about how many plants start out in a greenhouse and are later moved outside. No consistent effort is made to give them any particular type of soil inside and another type outside. Containers in a greenhouse also vary widely depending on the plants and a growers needs and preferences.
 
Joined
Jan 30, 2018
Messages
349
Reaction score
281
Location
SE. London/N.Kent. UK
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United Kingdom
Briefly. Containers. I presume you refer here to. Seed trays. Flower pots. Planters including hanging baskets.

Soil for each. Seed trays. You can mix your own soil using for instance published data of, JI=John Innes seed compost. Easier and often so much cheaper, various composts can be purchased.

The pots. Flower pots come in many sizes, starting with thumbs upwards. Pots made from clay used to be the main ones. Plastic pots have now taken over, and for some gardeners, various kinds of glazed pots are used. Whatever you choose, avoid containers with inward facing lips. Unless an ordinary pot is to be placed inside.
Soils and composts. Using pots and planters etc. Soils & composts need to be courser and well drained. For planters, periodic feeding will be required. Hanging baskest. Usually the compost is much liter such as a coir, spagnum moss, and/or peat, if the latter is still of legal use in your area.

There is so much more to greenhouse growing. Available on EBay. Growing under glass. Published by the Royal Horticultural Society. England. It is well worth buying.
Best wishes.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
5,386
Reaction score
4,366
Location
Birmingham, AL USA
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
I am guilty of reading labels on bags of soil and reacting to the last problem or workload I suffered by trying to purchase a solution. I think I would say if I ran into one problem with the various bagged soils I have experienced, it has to be holding to much moisture. Something that drains really well will also have a lot of pore space for air to the roots. The opposite of this results in root rots at a minimum. Sure sure swamp lily likes it mucky but I am speaking about baseline generalities. This idea is matching to every plant that claims to need well draining soil, which appears to be most of them. It would be better to recycle the drained water than try to hold it in the soil is another way to say it.
 

mvona

The butler
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Messages
52
Reaction score
10
Location
Western New York
Hardiness Zone
5
Country
United States
What type of plants will you be growing in your greenhouse?

For the most part, each type of plant will want the same type of soil regardless of whether it is grown inside a greenhouse or outside. As further evidence of this, think about how many plants start out in a greenhouse and are later moved outside. No consistent effort is made to give them any particular type of soil inside and another type outside. Containers in a greenhouse also vary widely depending on the plants and a growers needs and preferences.
Marck - I hope to use the greenhouse to start my tomatoes and peppers. Maybe house a few house plants in there. Thank you for the reply. I expect there to be another 6-8 weeks, weather depending, before I actually get started in there. the Butler
 

mvona

The butler
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Messages
52
Reaction score
10
Location
Western New York
Hardiness Zone
5
Country
United States
Briefly. Containers. I presume you refer here to. Seed trays. Flower pots. Planters including hanging baskets.

Soil for each. Seed trays. You can mix your own soil using for instance published data of, JI=John Innes seed compost. Easier and often so much cheaper, various composts can be purchased.

The pots. Flower pots come in many sizes, starting with thumbs upwards. Pots made from clay used to be the main ones. Plastic pots have now taken over, and for some gardeners, various kinds of glazed pots are used. Whatever you choose, avoid containers with inward facing lips. Unless an ordinary pot is to be placed inside.
Soils and composts. Using pots and planters etc. Soils & composts need to be courser and well drained. For planters, periodic feeding will be required. Hanging baskest. Usually the compost is much liter such as a coir, spagnum moss, and/or peat, if the latter is still of legal use in your area.

There is so much more to greenhouse growing. Available on EBay. Growing under glass. Published by the Royal Horticultural Society. England. It is well worth buying.
Best wishes.
Dear Mike,
thank you for the reply. Weather depending I expect to get started end of February beginning of March so I am reading these replies and gathering ideas that seem to fit my purpose. I will look for the book. Thanks again, the Butler
 
Ad

Advertisements

mvona

The butler
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Messages
52
Reaction score
10
Location
Western New York
Hardiness Zone
5
Country
United States
I am guilty of reading labels on bags of soil and reacting to the last problem or workload I suffered by trying to purchase a solution. I think I would say if I ran into one problem with the various bagged soils I have experienced, it has to be holding to much moisture. Something that drains really well will also have a lot of pore space for air to the roots. The opposite of this results in root rots at a minimum. Sure sure swamp lily likes it mucky but I am speaking about baseline generalities. This idea is matching to every plant that claims to need well draining soil, which appears to be most of them. It would be better to recycle the drained water than try to hold it in the soil is another way to say it.
Dirt Mechanic, thank You for the reply. I hope to get started at the end of February or the beginning of March and that is weather depending. That sounds like rational advice. Obviously if it remains cold at night and stays cool throughout the day, there will be less moisture evaporating from the soil. I have a feeling I'll have to be in there daily checking. The Butler
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top