Question about fruit


Joined
Sep 6, 2021
Messages
11
Reaction score
9
Location
Alberta
Country
Canada
Hello, I just had a couple of questions and was wondering if anyone could help me answer/explain them.

1) is it true that strawberries and blackberries take a couple of years to fruit (2-3 years?) if that’s not true or partly, which plant variety would have the fastest fruiting rate?

1) What would be the easiest fruits to grow from seed indoors and would fruit the fastest?

Thank you!!! :)
 
Ad

Advertisements

Meadowlark

Gardner, Angler, Adjunct Professor, and Rancher
Joined
Feb 5, 2019
Messages
772
Reaction score
662
Location
East Texas
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
1) strawberry plants started in hills in the fall will generally produce fruit the following spring. However, planted in spring, they won't produce until the following spring.

Blackberries have canes with leaves the first year, and the following year those canes bear fruit. Then, those two-year canes die back and new canes form. Its important to choose a variety or your area.

1. Off the two, strawberries would be the easier to grow indoors.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
1,864
Reaction score
639
Location
California
Country
United States
If by your second question, you mean any fruit, then there are three main factors you want to consider are 1) chilling factor & dormancy, 2) plant size, and 3) annual vs. perennial.

1). Many fruiting plants either have chilling requirements for fruit set or they simply go dormant in Winter. It will be complicated to give these plants their necessary requirements indoors, especially if growing area part of your living space? Of course, you can try moving them outside of course, but timing needs to be right, and for some of them that may be too cold. For indoor fruiting, consider tropical and subtropical fruits. I'm thinking something like Passionfruit (Passiflora spp.) might give you a good yield for the space, if trellised and lit correctly.

2). Smaller plants will be easier to grow indoors. They will take up less space and be easier to properly light. That's mostly why strawberries (Fragaria spp.) would be a better choice than Blackberries and other brambles (Rubus spp.). Though you might want to consider such northern low-growing delicacies as Cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus)

3). The easy thing about anual crops is that the plants do not have to be maintained through a dormant season. This might make things easier for indoor growing, depending on the set-up. Recall that many annual 'vegetables' are really savory or semi-sweet fruit fruits, including a number of species in the Nightshade Family (Solanaceae): tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum), peppers (Capsicum annuum), tomatillos (Physalis spp.), eggplant (Solanum melongena), and garden-huckleberries (Solanum spp.). Garden-huckleberries are usually only sweet with added sugar, but some tomato and tomatillo cultivars are quite sweet. Some can also be short-lived perennials in warm climates. The Gourd family (Cucurbitacea) also has many species grown as annuals including cucumbers (Cucumis sativus), melons (Cucumis melo), squash (Cucurbita spp.), Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and a number of others. If plant size and space are not an issue, these should also be considered.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top