Protecting knock out roses


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Hi everyone!

I planted 15 knock out roses along my fence line this year as part of my yard renovation. The idea was to have a hedge like look. I have been getting different advice from everyone as far as winter protection goes. From dont do anything they are hardy, trim back to 6 inches above ground, layer heavy bunch around tge base, etc etc etc.

My concern is, they are not close to the house like everyone else's lol. Mine are along the fence line which is like an open field. Chain link fence. I can buy the cones,but over the years they will grow bigger etc and I want them to get big. Our winters in Chicago can be harsh, but nothing like Wisconsin or Michigan. I was reading about burlap, but does that mean I have to wrap the whole bush in burlap?
 
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Hello Sabina. Truly, I wish that I was more familiar with the growing conditions over there in the US. I have no idea what burlap is. If I may share some useful advice. This may I say, also relates to gardeners in other countries. Gardeners/plant lovers. We all become tempted to try our hand at growing , non local plants. We take on a great responsibility. Providing suitable soil/compost growing medium, but also the general welfare of the plant. Natural, seasonal changes create problems. In hot sunny areas, even some sun loving plants may call for some artificial protection and shading. Then come the fall/winter time. Damaging winds and of course, frost and snow, even to freezing point. In the natural world, these problems have been taken care of. In our, todays world. We have so much to learn. Briefly. Wind protection. Provide strong secure wind breaks. If cutting back plant growth close to ground level. Cover with straw or bracken. Plants in containers. Take the trouble to either move inside or, to wrap the container in hessian or similar. Try and let the plant die back naturally first, then remove dead, decaying material then cover etc.
 
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For sure I would use minimum 3 inches of mulch. I use hardwood chips here in Alabama but who knows what you have access to ip there. They grow really fast so even if they burn back they will come out flowering like mad in the spring. How cold is your coldest winter and do you get a lot of snow?
 
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Mike Allen i like alot of what you say. Almost like we spoil our plants/flowers lol. In the natural world they endure alot. I have fun with my garden and house plants.

It can get pretty cold here with January and February reaching freezing points. It can get extreme with windchills making it in the negative. I only worry because they are not protecting by the house or any heat radiant from the house to them. I planted 15 of them and spent about 6 weeks taking out the old vegetable from previous owners, and random stuff growing along the fence line to create this. I guess you can say these are my babies. I can put mulch around the base no problem. But didn't want to trim them back so close to the ground. I saw a video on YouTube with a lady from New Jersey who's knock out rose bush is Huge!!! But hers looked closer to the house. I guess I worry about the branches.
 

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