Please enlighten me: roses and roses... and yet more roses..


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I know you posted ages ago @Sheal .... but your rose is fabulous!!!:) My Dad has one the same shade, has yours got a gorgeous scent like his has?
 
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I have found since moving to North Carolina that there is such a thing as a wild rose. They grow everywhere up here. They are a vine that can reach 15 feet tall. They produce no flowers and have thorns about double the size of domestic roses. Up here the people call them milaways because if you get stuck by one people can hear you cuss a mile away.
 
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If the graft of a rose is below ground then the chances are suckers will be produced. These grow from the original rootstock and will not flower the same as the rest of the shrub so need to be pruned out.

Thank you @Upsy Daisy. :) They are two different roses, the first picture is 'Ebb Tide' and the second 'Blue For You'. They look similar but were planted away from each other in a bed of nine. Both were perfumed. I'm speaking in the past tense here as they were in my previous garden, but I've kept the pictures of them all.

How do you know it's a rose @Silentrunning if it never blooms? All our wild roses here bloom.
 
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If the graft of a rose is below ground then the chances are suckers will be produced. These grow from the original rootstock and will not flower the same as the rest of the shrub so need to be pruned out.

Thank you @Upsy Daisy. :) They are two different roses, the first picture is 'Ebb Tide' and the second 'Blue For You'. They look similar but were planted away from each other in a bed of nine. Both were perfumed. I'm speaking in the past tense here as they were in my previous garden, but I've kept the pictures of them all.

How do you know it's a rose @Silentrunning if it never blooms? All our wild roses here bloom.
If our weather warms up a bit I will take a picture of the leaf formation. I don’ Know that it is a true member of the rose family but that is what everyone calls them.
 
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@Mike Allen I've got a lot of roses and they were planted about 20 years ago. At that time they said plant with the graft above the soil,so we did. They're still going well without no problems. I've planted a new one early winter and it's under the soil,so see how it goes.:)
I bet your garden looks a picture when the roses are in bloom. A couple of years ago, I came across a HT. My Valentine. I had to buy it. My late wife, (My Valentine) was actually born 14.2.1944. Fantastic blooms. Strong, full bodied, does not fade. As a cut bloom or left on the plant, I have logged it as lasting 19-21 days before it begins to show signs of fading/dying.
 
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Sheal, here is the photo of my “wild rose”. The wild one is on the left and the clipping on the right is from a rose in our flower bed. I hope you can see the detail clearly enough. They both have 5 leaves per branch and the same configuration of opposing leaves and a single leaf at the end. Let me know what you think.



If the graft of a rose is below ground then the chances are suckers will be produced. These grow from the original rootstock and will not flower the same as the rest of the shrub so need to be pruned out.

Thank you @Upsy Daisy. :) They are two different roses, the first picture is 'Ebb Tide' and the second 'Blue For You'. They look similar but were planted away from each other in a bed of nine. Both were perfumed. I'm speaking in the past tense here as they were in my previous garden, but I've kept the pictures of them all.

How do you know it's a rose @Silentrunning if it never blooms? All our wild roses here bloom.
 
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Thanks Silentrunning. (y) Well it certainly looks like a rose. The only difference I can see is the leaves look longer/narrower than most roses and the serrated edge only seems to go part of the way down the leaves. I don't understand why it doesn't flower though. The only ideas I have are - it may be lack of fertiliser or water. Or it's so busy producing long stems it doesn't have enough energy to put into flowers.

I'm intrigued! If they grew here I would dig one up and plant it in my own garden, then nurture it for a couple of years just to see if it would produce flowers. :)
 

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Since this is the forum's "Everything Basic about Roses" thread, I would like to know - is the hybrid tea rose the one grown for long stemmed roses? From reading Sheal's description and looking at Logan's pictures, I assume it is, but I always like to check. :unsure:


I have found since moving to North Carolina that there is such a thing as a wild rose
We have wild roses in Ohio, but ours flower. Tiny flowers about the size of a nickel. (About 21 mm, for those who don't live with nickels! :ROFLMAO:.) I'll take a picture this summer when they bloom and post it here. :)


I don't understand why it doesn't flower though. The only ideas I have are - it may be lack of fertiliser or water. Or it's so busy producing long stems it doesn't have enough energy to put into flowers.
I'm intrigued! If they grew here I would dig one up and plant it in my own garden, then nurture it for a couple of years just to see if it would produce flowers. :)

I'm intrigued, too, because ours do flower. SilentRunning, would you be willing to throw a couple horse apples on one? :LOL: I love a good experiment! :geek:
 
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Regarding the position of the graft. During the time I've been growing roses, I've tried several positions. From above ground level, to below ground level. In a cold climate, the best position for it seems to be about 4" under the ground level.

I'm waiting to collect a single new rose from my supplier. If anyone wants, I'll take photos of the way I do it and post.
 
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Hi Mary Mary. To the writing of many books etc about the Rose. I would go as far as saying all are true.

The HT or Hybrid Tea rose became popular due perhaps to it's dominance. Florabundas are fabulous plants providing loads of delightful blooms often ev today when so many new roses sadly lack any fragrance. The Musk roses delight some but not all. Then there are perhaps the singles, not as it might appear being far removed from the wild rugosa or canine.

Along comes the HT Hybrid Tea rose.. Stolling through the rose garden, suddenly it almost shouts out at you. Hey' here I am, look at me. Why not? This rose produces long stems usually with a single bud at the tip. The bud starts out being pointed, then as it unfolds. WOW! Try and view it now, as a time lapse camera might record it. Each brief moment, so much beauty is unfolding. Please do not misunderstand me. When I watch a HT rose unfurling, it is like a brief moment in time of perhaps, watching ones beloved waking up. Then in an instant the full beauty is revealed. Truthfully. What more could the admirer say but. I love you.

This Is how I look upon the HT rose. It truly is worth the sacrifice of multiple blooms and scent.
Please continue to enjoy your roses.
 
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Silent, your wild rose certainly looks like a rose. It may be a Lady Banks--which you definitely do not want in your garden! It does bloom once in the spring and then happily spends the rest of the season tearing down pergolas, removing shed roofs, and being a real pain.
We have several roses, all own-root and several antiques. Hybrids just don't like our climate, but own-root and antiques do. Here's an Aloha on a trellis--lovely scent, too!
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Yes, please!! (y) :D
MaryMary especially for you....This is how I plant my roses. I'm not saying its right or wrong, but it works for me.

First thing is to put the rose in a bucket of water. I'm lucky enough to be able to use water from my own well. As local farmers use it for their animals, I know its good! Normally, I fill the bucket a couple of hours before planting, to give the water time to reach air temperature.

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Next up of course is to dig the hole where the rose will be planted. In this case, its volume is 20 US gallons.

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At the bottom of the hole, I put a layer of "Mother-in-Law" fertiliser. Otherwise known as "Mature Cow." :whistle: On top of that, some specific rose soil,and a sprinkling of Mycorrhizal Fungi. About 1 ounce for the plant in total.

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I put the rose in position, with the graft about 4 inches below ground level. Just over the width of my hand.

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I then continue to fill the hole with the rose soil, as well as more of the fungi, pressing it down to remove air pockets, and of course adding water. Usually, this will be the contents of the bucket. Finally, it looks like this.

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Some may agree with this method, some may not. Feel free to comment.
 
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Flatlander, your reference to "mother in law fertilizer", aka cow manure made me laugh! Fertilizer from my mother-in-law would kill any plant it touched. Shall we say she was a bit acidic?
I like to use well-composted steer manure to give roses a boost. We use captured rainwater on edible plants and on flowers. I envy you having a well, but we have to manage with our rainwater.
Since we don't have grafted roses, we just plant new ones at the same soil level as the pot they came in.
Have you found that smaller roses (ones that would normally be in a one gallon pot) seem to do better and grow quicker than larger roses?
 

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MaryMary especially for you....
Thank you! :)

Flatlander, could I ask you to update your profile with either the state you live in, or your hardiness zone? :unsure: I wondered where you were to be planting roses now, but looking at your avatar/info gives me nothing. :( :sorry:
 
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Your method is good Flatlander but doesn't planting the graft underground produce suckers?
@Sheal All of my roses are planted in that way, and I've never seen any suckers at all on any of them. Perhaps the graft is too deep? If there are any rose experts on here, it would be nice to know their opinions.
 

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