Please enlighten me: roses and roses... and yet more roses..

Discussion in 'Roses' started by alp, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. alp

    alp

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    Appeal to all rose experts: What is a shrub rose, a hybrid tea?

    As you know, I'm not a gardener and was asked by @Logan if my purple rose is a shrub rose .. I am out of my depth, (ah, there isn't any depth!) Please tell me more about the varieties of roses.. If the discourse is too long, tell me what a shrub rose or hybrid tea is please... Or any relevant info that I need to know.

    Thank you in advance.
     
    alp, Sep 9, 2017
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  2. alp

    Sheal

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    A rough idea for you Alp. :) Other members may want to add to this as roses are a wide subject.

    A shrub rose grows in bush form to a height and spread of approximately 4ft depending on the variety and specifically named rose.

    A climber grows high with very little spread in comparison.

    A rambler grows high like a climber but tends to spread more covering any frame or building.

    Patio roses have a growth of around 2-3ft usually, being smaller than a shrub rose, ideal as their name suggests for patio pots.

    Miniature roses tend to be indoor plants, height approximately 12-16 inches.

    A hybrid tea rose generally has one flower per stem, where as a Floribunda has multiple flowers on each stem. Both are shrub roses.

    I grew Floribunda's in my last garden (a coastal position) as they are hardier than other roses.

    Have you a picture of your rose please @alp, I might be able to identify it for you. :)
     
    Sheal, Sep 9, 2017
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  3. alp

    alp

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    I will take photos later! I'm glad that I ask.. So much useful info! Thank you, @Sheal
     
    alp, Sep 10, 2017
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  4. alp

    Sheal

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    You're welcome @alp :)
     
    Sheal, Sep 10, 2017
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  5. alp

    DirtMechanic

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    Could I tag along and ask about preparing a rose for winter? I found ours were just rootstock so the grafts must need to be covered in mulch perhaps? I am in 8a Alabama
     
    DirtMechanic, Oct 8, 2017
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  6. alp

    alp

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    This might help you, but I hope @Sheal will come to your rescue.



    if you are in a cold winter area.
     
    alp, Oct 8, 2017
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  7. alp

    DirtMechanic

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    Thank you. It will get down to 5f here every 15-20 years.
     
    DirtMechanic, Oct 8, 2017
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  8. alp

    alp

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    Oh, crumbs! I'm shivering look at the conversion! Brrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!
     
    alp, Oct 9, 2017
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  9. alp

    Sheal

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    Hi DirtMechanic. :) I'm sorry I can't help you with over wintering roses, temperatures here are higher so there is no need to mulch as shown in the link that Alp kindly posted.

    I would suggest that mulching is a good idea, but you must remember to remove it come the growing season as the rose been grafted may well produce suckers from that graft, these being unwanted shoots from the original rootstock.
     
    Sheal, Oct 11, 2017
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  10. alp

    marlingardener

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    Dirtmechanic, let us know where you are in the states--overwintering roses changes according to winter climates. Here in zone 8a or b Texas, I cut our roses (all antiques and own root stock, no grafted hybrids) back to about 1/3 of their height and width, pile 3" to 4" of compost around them but not touching the stems, and let nature take its course. The first year the rose is in the ground I water once a month during winter (Dec., Jan., Feb.) and when the little red nubbins start to appear on the stems, I pull the remaining compost back and if it doesn't rain, I water deeply once a week. Watering deeply means watering until there is still a shimmer of water on the ground around the rose.
     
    marlingardener, Oct 12, 2017
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  11. alp

    DirtMechanic

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    I am 30 miles south of Birmingham, AL. The humidity, summer heat can be stunningly offset by the occasional cold winter. It is the nature of the transitional zone in which I live. I overlooked some vining fence ramblers and they died back to the rootstock, so I am trying to aquire some basic knowledge before I replace them. I want to say thank you for all the useful tips.
     
    DirtMechanic, Oct 13, 2017
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  12. alp

    marlingardener

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    DirtMechanic, you zone's weather is like ours! I've found several roses that not only tolerate our humidity, heat, and occasional cold snap (20 degrees for two or three days) but thrive.
    For climbers or fountain roses, see if you can find Crimson Cascade. It is so hardy I have to cut it back twice each year. It's thorny, but we have to pay a price for gorgeous.
    Also, Nacadoches is a yellow shrub rose that blooms and blooms. It will get 7' tall, and can stand severe pruning. I love this rose!
    And if you want a more restrained rose that is red, heavy bloomer, and gets about 3' tall, Sophie's Rose is a very good choice. Sorry I don't have a photo, but take my word for it, this rose is a winner.
    All three are own-root roses. None need dead-heading or babying. I do dead-head occasionally just because I like to commune with my roses.
     

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    marlingardener, Oct 14, 2017
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  13. alp

    Logan Logan

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    A hybrid tea, also has clusters of flowers. Some look like florabundas
     
    Logan, Oct 15, 2017
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  14. alp

    Sheal

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    That's interesting Logan. I've never seen one but there again I've not looked for them. :)
     
    Sheal, Oct 16, 2017
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  15. alp

    Logan Logan

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    I've got them in my garden, i'll take some photos tomorrow if the wind has stopped.
     
    Logan, Oct 16, 2017
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  16. alp

    Logan Logan

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    @Sheal here's some of my roses, they're all Hybrid teas.
    IMG_20171017_171141.jpg
    IMG_20171017_171150.jpg
    IMG_20171017_172128.jpg
    IMG_20171017_171105.jpg
    Still got a lot of buds on this one
    IMG_20171017_171215.jpg
    Some do have single flowers
    IMG_20171017_171051.jpg
    IMG_20171017_171224.jpg
     

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    Logan, Oct 17, 2017
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  17. alp

    Sheal

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    Lovely roses @Logan. :) I see what you mean about more than one flower on a stem. They seem to branch off though where as the floribunda's have multiple buds/flowers at the top of a stem.

    Rose 'Ebb Tide' (2).JPG

    Rose 'Blue For You' (2).JPG
     
    Sheal, Oct 17, 2017
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  18. alp

    Logan Logan

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    @Sheal They look great.They're almost the same. I do have one that's like that, but the flowers have gone over now.
     
    Logan, Oct 17, 2017
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  19. alp

    Mike Allen

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    There are two lines of thought here... one is, that the graft should be below the soil surface, say two inches, the other, that it should just be level or above soil level. I often confess to one who challenges and at times contradict the books etc. Just a simple theory. When the graft is sub surface, it will be kept moist. If and when the graft is stuck out in the open, it has no protection. To add to the confusion. What happens when you, attend to the rose bed, either tittyvating up or applying a mulch. Di you end up with some raised grafts and others buried. Sorry friends. I do like to stretch science at times. Happy gardening.
     
    Mike Allen, Mar 19, 2018
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  20. alp

    Logan Logan

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    @Mike Allen I've got a lot of roses and they were planted about 20 years ago. At that time they said plant with the graft above the soil,so we did. They're still going well without no problems. I've planted a new one early winter and it's under the soil,so see how it goes.:)
     
    Logan, Mar 19, 2018
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