Planting leggy transplants


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Do you think it would be easier or harder to water-stress your plants, if you only had THREE sets of roots?
:whistle:
Well, I would say I do the opposite of molly coddle them and normally I only have two set of roots, fibrous and tap. Myco is attached to the roots in a symbiotic relationship and are not roots. When I plant deep it is only when I must. I don't grow leggy plants on purpose. And If I cut the tap root off the plant I think it would die. So in essence I have 2 fibrous root systems and 1 taproot. And planting deep can be a big drawback to stressing tomatoes. In many cases planting on their side would be easier to stress them as soil tends to be dryer on top. Today either way would not work as the soil is still too moist 2 inches deep to stress anything. So to answer the question, the least amount of roots you have the easier it is to stress the plant. Here, it hasn't been this wet for a LOOONG time so this discussion is about an aberration of normalcy. I just wish it would happen every year.
 
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I wished you all would stop this smart business. All I am is old and the longer you do something the more you learn. I'll bet I have killed more plants than most gardeners have ever planted. I wouldn't call that smart.
It's not the mistakes that make us smart, or dumb... It's what we do afterwards. I'm betting your smart enough to realize when you've made a mistake and have learned from them. That's a lot of info to pass along!
 
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No. It is more likely to see benefit of that relationship when under stress.
But what starts the myco relationship? Mere presence to begin with? But what food source if the plant has access to acceptable nutrients already and does not provide support to the myco as a result? Myco ebbs away until a plant becomes stressed and puts out chemistry and sugars from the root to get them back?
 
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I don't think I quite understand what you are saying.
I am trying to understand more about the idea presented to me that if a plant does not need beneficial fungi because it is already getting what it needs, then the plant roots will not feed the relationship with the fungi, in the form of carbon, which we know as sugars.
 
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What I am learning from this discussion is that gardeners do what is necessary/best for their plants and conditions. Gardening is not a science so much as an art, and the folks here are artists!
 
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I am trying to understand more about the idea presented to me that if a plant does not need beneficial fungi because it is already getting what it needs, then the plant roots will not feed the relationship with the fungi, in the form of carbon, which we know as sugars.
[/QUOTE
I will try to explain what little I know about myco. Plants feed themselves through roots but only partially because a plants roots are giganticly huge when compared to myco. Therefor your hypothesis that a plant is getting all it needs is for the most part false because a plants roots must be in contact with the soil to uptake nutrients and large roots half the size of a hair will deplete granules of soil of their nutrients in no time. Myco "roots" are extremely small and can encircle a granule of soil thousands upon thousands of times. Myco roots aren't really "roots" Myco feeds on sugars made through the plants leaves by photosynthesis and in return breaks down organic matter into compounds favorable to the plant in which the plant then uptakes as nutrients. There are at least two kinds or forms of myco and iirc are called endomycorrhizae and ectomyco. One of them encapsulates the plants roots and protects it from disease and the other on actually lives inside the plants roots and helps with nutrient uptake. And that's about all I know about myco except that it works and thanks to @headfullofbees doesn't affect or even like brassicas or maybe that's vice versa.
 
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... Or loony... Just sayin o_O :ROFLMAO: (y)
Its an actual thing. Here is another version. Pigs, because they let us eat them, have had a population explosion to the extent that they have more individuals than us. Thus the question, are you truly smarter than a pig? There is an author by the last name Pollan from which I draw that thesis.

It would be a good tv show. Are you in control of you or are the pigs in control of you and why.
 
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Sorry I missed the text initially. Yeah, i understand what you are saying.

Endo and ectomorphic fungi..ok they are buzzwords.

Both need the service of a farmer, and the farmer is not a human being.

Thats hard to grasp
 
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But what starts the myco relationship? Mere presence to begin with? But what food source if the plant has access to acceptable nutrients already and does not provide support to the myco as a result? Myco ebbs away until a plant becomes stressed and puts out chemistry and sugars from the root to get them back?
Mere presence.
That relationship can be broken in a number of ways, by soil condition; e.g. too much phosphate in the soil, but plants do not have the option.
They are attacked by myco, but that attack is not enough to hurt the plant, because the carb provided by the plant is negligible, but the benefits, especially in times of stress, far outweigh the harm.
 
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So, Chuck, from what I've gathered, you don't have any evidence that deep-buried surface roots continue to work, you feel they do, so you may, or may not, sacrifice some precious growing season in order to have them, already having lost some to adverse weather; but, if, as you believe, they do, they do continue to work, they make your chosen water-stress management plan more difficult.
That's beneficial?
 
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So, Chuck, from what I've gathered, you don't have any evidence that deep-buried surface roots continue to work, you feel they do, so you may, or may not, sacrifice some precious growing season in order to have them, already having lost some to adverse weather; but, if, as you believe, they do, they do continue to work, they make your chosen water-stress management plan more difficult.
That's beneficial?
I wouldn't say beneficial. I'd say more realistic. But, about the deep-buried surface roots. Since they are the same as the top surface roots they must be feeder roots too correct? And what is something alive on a plant that has no function, does not work, yet it is there for no apparent purpose whatsoever. How can the plant justify its existence. I submit that it can't. A plant naturally gets rid of many injured or non-working parts during its lifespan. I.E. damaged/infected leaves, limbs, blooms etc. so why doesn't the plant get rid of those deep buried feeder roots that don't feed anything. Just let them slough off or shrivel up and fall off or something. I say that those roots are doing something are they wouldn't still be there.
One doesn't NEED a water stress management program to have a good crop. One has a water stress management program because he WANTS to produce more and if the program is unable to work for some reason such as weather so be it. He will still have a good crop.
 
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Tomatoes have no facility to shed deep-buried roots because they have no facility to grow them in the first place.

Flightless birds have wings.
Humans have an appendix.
Men have nipples.

Many double (or more) flowers (like dahlias for instance) are sterile, because their blooms replace sexual organs with more layers of petals or the petals block them. They have to be propagated by cuttings, or other means, but they still flower every year!
In order to do so they must divert energy from other parts of the plant, to no purpose.
 
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Tomatoes have no facility to shed deep-buried roots because they have no facility to grow them in the first place.

Flightless birds have wings.
Humans have an appendix.
Men have nipples.

Many double (or more) flowers (like dahlias for instance) are sterile, because their blooms replace sexual organs with more layers of petals or the petals block them. They have to be propagated by cuttings, or other means, but they still flower every year!
In order to do so they must divert energy from other parts of the plant, to no purpose.
I only know, along with many others, is that deep planting works. Whether or not it is detrimental to the overall production or growth of the plant it is impossible to actually know one way or the other. Perhaps if we had two plants of exact clones we would know but since there are no exact clones we won't ever know for sure.
 
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Look Chuck, you've said you know it works, but don't know what benefits you get from it.

Plants propagated from suckers or cuttings are exact clones
 
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Chuck: If you have not planted all your leggy seedlings, why not cut a few of them down to just above the cotyledons (or just above the first leaf stem if you've already buried the cots.), and grow the sucker it will produce?
Thus you have a new stem on the same plant, which will grow as normal, unaffected by low light levels.
Should have been done as the light improved, but still likely to be a better answer.
 

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