How does Bonnie start their plants

Joined
May 15, 2016
Messages
847
Reaction score
360
Location
Miami, FL
Hardiness Zone
10b
Country
United States
I'm curious because most of their tomatoes are hybrids (which means they can't grow the exact variety from seeds). How do they start their plants? Do they clone from suckers? This always confused me.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
11,523
Reaction score
5,607
Location
La Porte Texas
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
I'm curious because most of their tomatoes are hybrids (which means they can't grow the exact variety from seeds). How do they start their plants? Do they clone from suckers? This always confused me.
It is too complicated to explain. Google F1 vs F2 seeds. There is a lot of scientific mumbo jumbo that will explain.
 
Joined
Mar 16, 2015
Messages
447
Reaction score
536
Hardiness Zone
USDA 10a - Sunset 22
Country
United States
Cuttings from Mothers. I visited a high production nursery and it was very automated and high tech. I think they did in excess 1,000,000 cuttings (cut from mothers and then planted in liners) a year, they did flowers primarily. Humidity and Misting rooms for the cuttings half the size of a football field. Moisture, humidity, temperature, light all automated, picture below. Big greenhouses just for the mother plants.


I think the mother plants had a 3 month cutting life span, for maybe 6 cuts total, cuttings taken every 2 weeks. Cuttings went from mother plant to liner pretty much same day. New mother plants would be started from the cuttings of existing mother plants.

In theory with one plant you could produce 1,000,000 plants in time with mothers and cuttings. Many hi breeds have stated from a singular plant. There is a popular plant that was found in the San Francisco area (northern California somewhere) that was the source for all subsequent plants. Dang can't remember the name and I don't think it is the only example, although it is a perennial.


Growing rooms the size of football fields. A machine about 20 x 20 that loaded liners with slips and soil mix. They had 4x4x8 bales of peat everywhere. Large areas for plant trials.

Untitled.jpg
 
Joined
Jan 5, 2017
Messages
1,529
Reaction score
1,351
Location
Atlantic Beach, Fl
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United States
....In theory with one plant you could produce 1,000,000 plants in time with mothers and cuttings. Many hi breeds have stated from a singular plant. There is a popular plant that was found in the San Francisco area (northern California somewhere) that was the source for all subsequent plants. Dang can't remember the name and I don't think it is the only example, although it is a perennial....
This is basically how banana plants are propagated, since they are infertile. Works great until a disease comes along that can wipe them all out, since they are all basically the exact same genetically. http://www.fusariumwilt.org/index.php/en/about/
 
Joined
Mar 22, 2017
Messages
4,320
Reaction score
3,301
Location
Kent
Country
United Kingdom
Cor, that reminds me of my place of work. I was given charge of the propagators.....there is no way you could go in there with your spectacles on - they misted up pronto!
 
Joined
Apr 13, 2017
Messages
69
Reaction score
52
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
I'm curious because most of their tomatoes are hybrids (which means they can't grow the exact variety from seeds). How do they start their plants? Do they clone from suckers? This always confused me.
I'm so glad you asked this because I had been wondering the same thing.
 
Joined
Mar 16, 2015
Messages
447
Reaction score
536
Hardiness Zone
USDA 10a - Sunset 22
Country
United States
I was going through some pictures and found these.

Mother Plants for Cuttings
20141122_094648.jpg


Cuttings rooting
20141122_095835.jpg
 
Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
4,224
Reaction score
1,488
Location
California
Country
United States
I'm curious because most of their tomatoes are hybrids (which means they can't grow the exact variety from seeds). How do they start their plants? Do they clone from suckers? This always confused me.
Understanding the basics of creating F1 hybrids isn't that difficult.
Imagine two genetically different parent plants. These parent plants are the Parental or P generation. Each parent is diploid and homozygous for the gene loci of interest. Diploid means that they have only two copies of their genetic code, just like humans do. Homozygous means that all of the copies of those loci are identical.

When the two parent plants are crossed, all of their offspring will have the same heterozygous allele combination at that loci. Heterozygous means the two copies of the gene are notidentical. These offspring are the Filial or F1 generation. It is this generation, as seeds, that we purchase when we buy F1 hybrids.

If the F1 generation is crossed to produce an F2 generation. They will no longer breed true, because of heterozygotic gene sorting.

Here is an illustration that may help explain.
FilialHybridUniformity.jpg
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
27,253
Messages
260,779
Members
13,774
Latest member
jashanbhardwaj

Latest Threads

Top