Help! I think I am growing my dragonfruit seeds the wrong way!


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Hey guys!

So I got my seeds in today and after doing some research I figured that it would be best to plant them on a moist paper towel in a tiny environment covered with plastic wrap. As soon as I put them in (5 minutes or less after), white stuff started to form on some of the seeds, which got me worried. I then found this forum and made this post. Hopefully I am still on time to save them.
I included a picture to clarify.

Thank you so much already!
I really hope someone can help.

All the best,
Rexorbrave
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Hey guys!

So I got my seeds in today and after doing some research I figured that it would be best to plant them on a moist paper towel in a tiny environment covered with plastic wrap. As soon as I put them in (5 minutes or less after), white stuff started to form on some of the seeds, which got me worried. I then found this forum and made this post. Hopefully I am still on time to save them.
I included a picture to clarify.

Thank you so much already!
I really hope someone can help.

All the best,
RexorbraveView attachment 31109
What I think you are seeing is a beneficial fungus which the seed company coated the seeds with. If I am correct it is called Tricoderma.
Why folks plant seeds on paper towels and put them into plastic bags has always been a mystery to me. You must put them in potting soil sooner or later anyway so why not just start with planting the seeds in potting soil at the start.

Here is a foolproof way of sprouting seeds. Get some little containers with holes in the bottom. Fill the containers completely full of the potting mix. Completely saturate the potting mix until the water stands on the surface. Remove from the water and let it drain a minute or two. Then gently mash the potting mix down about 3/4 of an inch. Place 2 seeds on the surface and then sprinkle 1/8th-1/4 inch of the dry potting mix over the seeds, making sure they are covered and gently press the mix down making sure the seeds make good contact with the mix. Then tightly fit a piece of saran wrap over the container and place in a warm place about 75F-80F. The seeds will sprout within 10 days but more likely within 5-7 days.
These directions are for seeds the size of peppers and tomatoes. For larger seeds do the same thing but plant the seeds slightly deeper.
As soon as the seeds sprout remove the saran wrap and put them in a warm sunny location. Do not fertilize until the 2nd set of true leaves appears. Always try to water from the bottom up not the top down. To prevent damping off disease sprinkle non-enriched cornmeal on the surface. Also snip off the smallest weakest plant when the 2nd set of true leaves first appears.
 
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What I think you are seeing is a beneficial fungus which the seed company coated the seeds with. If I am correct it is called Tricoderma.
Why folks plant seeds on paper towels and put them into plastic bags has always been a mystery to me. You must put them in potting soil sooner or later anyway so why not just start with planting the seeds in potting soil at the start.

Here is a foolproof way of sprouting seeds. Get some little containers with holes in the bottom. Fill the containers completely full of the potting mix. Completely saturate the potting mix until the water stands on the surface. Remove from the water and let it drain a minute or two. Then gently mash the potting mix down about 3/4 of an inch. Place 2 seeds on the surface and then sprinkle 1/8th-1/4 inch of the dry potting mix over the seeds, making sure they are covered and gently press the mix down making sure the seeds make good contact with the mix. Then tightly fit a piece of saran wrap over the container and place in a warm place about 75F-80F. The seeds will sprout within 10 days but more likely within 5-7 days.
These directions are for seeds the size of peppers and tomatoes. For larger seeds do the same thing but plant the seeds slightly deeper.
As soon as the seeds sprout remove the saran wrap and put them in a warm sunny location. Do not fertilize until the 2nd set of true leaves appears. Always try to water from the bottom up not the top down. To prevent damping off disease sprinkle non-enriched cornmeal on the surface. Also snip off the smallest weakest plant when the 2nd set of true leaves first appears.
Thank you for your quick reply!
Does this mean the seeds can not be used?
Should I be worried about the fungus or is it fine?
Sorry for all the questions but I just want them to succeed so much :p

Thanks so much again for replying to my thread :)
 
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Thank you for your quick reply!
Does this mean the seeds can not be used?
Should I be worried about the fungus or is it fine?
Sorry for all the questions but I just want them to succeed so much :p

Thanks so much again for replying to my thread :)
If that white stuff is what I think it is it is beneficial. Yes, your seeds you have "planted" will be OK. But when they germinate you will still have to bury them in potting mix. That is why it makes no sense to me to sprout seeds on a paper towel when as soon as they sprout (or soon after) you must put them in soil anyway. One must be very gentle with freshly sprouted seeds too. The slightest little damage to the "root" and it is lost.
 
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If that white stuff is what I think it is it is beneficial. Yes, your seeds you have "planted" will be OK. But when they germinate you will still have to bury them in potting mix. That is why it makes no sense to me to sprout seeds on a paper towel when as soon as they sprout (or soon after) you must put them in soil anyway. One must be very gentle with freshly sprouted seeds too. The slightest little damage to the "root" and it is lost.
Okay, Thanks again for your reply.
I got some cactus soil (as the DragonFruit belongs to the cacti). Would it be okay to plant these current seeds in that soil right now? Using your description, but using the pots I uploaded a picture of with this post (maybe if I make holes in the bottom for the water to go out)?

Thanks in advance for your reply and advice, I just joined this forum and it is already helping out so much :)
IMG_20180106_225422.jpg
 
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Okay, Thanks again for your reply.
I got some cactus soil (as the DragonFruit belongs to the cacti). Would it be okay to plant these current seeds in that soil right now? Using your description, but using the pots I uploaded a picture of with this post (maybe if I make holes in the bottom for the water to go out)?

Thanks in advance for your reply and advice, I just joined this forum and it is already helping out so much :)View attachment 31110
Personally, I think peat pots should be taken off the market for reasons I won't get into today, but if there is a hole in the bottom they will work although a little large to be planting seeds in. Your cactus mix will be fine although you might mix more peat into it as Dragon Fruit like acidic soils.
 
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Personally, I think peat pots should be taken off the market for reasons I won't get into today, but if there is a hole in the bottom they will work although a little large to be planting seeds in. Your cactus mix will be fine although you might mix more peat into it as Dragon Fruit like acidic soils.
Alright, thank you so much!
I will go ahead and try that!
 

JBtheExplorer

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Why folks plant seeds on paper towels and put them into plastic bags has always been a mystery to me. You must put them in potting soil sooner or later anyway so why not just start with planting the seeds in potting soil at the start.

The simple reason for me is that it's the easiest way to stratify seeds.
 
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The simple reason for me is that it's the easiest way to stratify seeds.
Wouldn't just placing the seed packet into the fridge work the same way? But anyway the OP is inquiring about Dragon Fruit which doesn't require anything but heat to germinate and all of the extra time involved and the care needed to sprout seeds on a paper towel seems a tad strange to me.
 
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I planted the seeds immediately in the ground. There were no problems. But I took the seeds from the fruit that I bought in the supermarket. I do not remember how much time the seeds sprouted. But they got up together.
 

JBtheExplorer

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Wouldn't just placing the seed packet into the fridge work the same way? But anyway the OP is inquiring about Dragon Fruit which doesn't require anything but heat to germinate and all of the extra time involved and the care needed to sprout seeds on a paper towel seems a tad strange to me.

No, because the seed packet isn't wet. They need both cold AND wet conditions. Paper towel stays wet for a long time in plastic bags.

I assumed that OP doesn't need that cold environment for their seeds, but just thought I'd explain why I use that method.
 
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No, because the seed packet isn't wet. They need both cold AND wet conditions. Paper towel stays wet for a long time in plastic bags.

I assumed that OP doesn't need that cold environment for their seeds, but just thought I'd explain why I use that method.
So just storing the seeds in the packet dry will not act as scarification if kept cold? Then, when ready to plant the seeds and placed in damp soil, what happens then? Many seeds take weeks to scarify, so won't the seeds rot? I have never done this before, I suppose because everything I plant either doesn't need scarification or I purchase plants.
 
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Why folks plant seeds on paper towels and put them into plastic bags has always been a mystery to me. You must put them in potting soil sooner or later anyway so why not just start with planting the seeds in potting soil at the start.

The Paper Towel / Baggie method seems to propagate faster but has a lower success rate in my experience. I do paper-towel when I don't want to wait x number of weeks for soil to get the job done -- not to say paper towel is better. It's just faster with some types of seeds :p

Not sure if the trade-off is even worth it. Guess people just got used to it after some time (like me lOl).
 
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