Free Trifoiliate Orange


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If you want some, I have 12-18 inch plants that I am going to dig up anyway if you would like some. You can pay the freight but I have 3" plastic tube to ship them in and my wife wants it thrown away so thats easy.
 
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We do not grow it for the fruit, rather we grow it for the thorns. This is without a doubt the single nastiest hedge you have ever experienced. It will keep wildlife out of your garden or your childrens bedroom window. However, you may impale gumdrops on the thorns for a festive holiday decoration.
 
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We do not grow it for the fruit, rather we grow it for the thorns. This is without a doubt the single nastiest hedge you have ever experienced. It will keep wildlife out of your garden or your childrens bedroom window. However, you may impale gumdrops on the thorns for a festive holiday decoration.
When I was a kid farmers used it to keep animals out of their gardens but it kept getting out of hand. In the late 50's the state of Texas banned the use and sale of the stuff and ever since it has been destroyed as soon as it is found. I haven't seen one in at least 40 years in my part of Texas. It's a kind offer though. How come you have one? I thought they were an invasive plant every where and if not illegal at least banned since their roots have proven to be only partially successful as a rootstock. I could be wrong but I thought sour orange and trifoiliate orange were two different plants.
 
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When I was a kid farmers used it to keep animals out of their gardens but it kept getting out of hand. In the late 50's the state of Texas banned the use and sale of the stuff and ever since it has been destroyed as soon as it is found. I haven't seen one in at least 40 years in my part of Texas. It's a kind offer though. How come you have one? I thought they were an invasive plant every where and if not illegal at least banned since their roots have proven to be only partially successful as a rootstock. I could be wrong but I thought sour orange and trifoiliate orange were two different plants.
Our plants go back 20 years or so. These are in our woods and have zero sun across the decidious season but get sun in the winter. They all came from one plant that my EVE planted in the yard and I eventually killed it due to risk of a mowing accident. Now I am sure this is not the same story as is in the book of Genesis, but if the devil had ever formed a fruit with seeds I am fairly sure this hardy orange is not far from evil intent.
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Our plants go back 20 years or so. These are in our woods and have zero sun across the decidious season but get sun in the winter. They all came from one plant that my EVE planted in the yard and I eventually killed it due to risk of a mowing accident. Now I am sure this is not the same story as is in the book of Genesis, but if the devil had ever formed a fruit with seeds I am fairly sure this hardy orange is not far from evil intent.
View attachment 46744 View attachment 46745
As I understand rootstocks the sour orange rootstock is the one used mostly today. The trifoilate was used but is not nemetode resistant and the fruit of the grafted tree was not completely satisfactory in some cultivars. But, as I understand, their rootstock is fairly good for tangerine/ mandarin types of oranges. So, why not dig them up and try to grow some type of tangerine from their roots.
 
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As I understand rootstocks the sour orange rootstock is the one used mostly today. The trifoilate was used but is not nemetode resistant and the fruit of the grafted tree was not completely satisfactory in some cultivars. But, as I understand, their rootstock is fairly good for tangerine/ mandarin types of oranges. So, why not dig them up and try to grow some type of tangerine from their roots.
I do not have the ability to run a grafting program. I am about to try to root some aucuba but that will be about it for this year. I see a lot of "Flying Dragon" grafts on hardy orange but it is not an interest as I have 300' of hardy orange to control already.

edit to say I am not familiar with Sour Orange variety or some of the other rooting ideas.
 
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Its hardy to zone 6 or better. @Chuck had me looking and here it not a class 1 invasive but a class 2 like wisteria. It grows persistently, but not super fast.
 
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'Flying Dragon' is striking plant for the landscape. Close enough to a sidewalk to see up close, -but not too close...
 

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