First time starting seeds...roots coming out of the bottom already?

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Hi-

This is my first time starting seeds. My vegetables are just starting to germinate and when I lifted up the trays to put water in the bottom, I noticed that the roots were coming out of the bottom of the trays.

I am assuming I need to move them to bigger containers? And when I transplant them to new containers do I need to use the seed starting mix or use regular potting soil so they can get nutrients?
 

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Roots out the bottom typically mean they are ready to go. It looks like a green beans off to the fast start. I am a little hesitant that the roots are that big but the plant doesn't seem to be quite heads up yet? I would think that you'd probably want to put it in the ground soon, once it is fully erect (head sup) and leaves out. A littl emor time in the sun should do it. I started some Snow Peas and Bush Beans in trays just the same as you did.

Keep in mind will need a bunch of containers to get edible portions.

Typically the larger seeds (peas, beans, cucumbers) will germinate quickly and large, where as a tomato will be a little slower, a little smaller. I'm a little surprised a few of the other larger vegetable haven't sprouted? I do see a few of the tomatoes up.

The cherry tomatoes might look a little leggy, but it could be too early to tell. Be sure everything stays lightly moist and gets plenty of sun/light. Just prior to transplantation or upon transplanting, if they have been in a sheltered area leave them out to late evening.... put them put early in the morning... so they can acclimate the outdoor temperature (hardening) before going out permanently.

If your moving to containers go with a decent quality potting soil. An enriched potting soil will have enough nutrients for a while but after about 3 weeks or so I would then start to fertilize. I might also suggest that a quality potting soil with some perlite (3 parts potting soil to 1 part perlite) (or so) will make a good seed starting mix and save you the expense seed starting mix.

Here is a peek at just about what you want transplant wise for non bean - pea type plants, this is a herb. This could be thinned i.e. a few of the sprouts trimmed off, but the roots are fairly prevalent, they are helping hold the soil together, they have just about reached the bottom, the soil is damp, not compacted, but not crumbly.

Not enough roots and things will fall apart, and there will be very little anchor. Too much root and it will be considered root bound and potentially not as successful a plant. This is applicable to anything from small like below to a 1 gallon or 5 gallon from the store.

Nice job :). We can talk peat pots next time.
ry%3D400
 
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Thank you for the response!!! I attached pictures of what they look like today.

I am headed to home depot today to get bigger pots and will get a good potting soil with perlite.

My garden isn't quite ready yet, and the last frost here isn't until the end of the month. But I want to give them some more room to grow. I have been putting them outside for a couple hours a day to get direct sunlight and get used to the breeze. When they are inside I make sure they are in the sunlight.

I put some more of the seed starting soil in the bottom of the tray so at least the roots would have something to hold on to. Everything has popped up except for the sweet peppers, but I read on the packet that they take longer to come up.
 

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Nice, I'm happy you responded and added pictures. Looking good (y). If you haven't already you typically buy the potting soil and perlite separate and then do the 3 to 1 or 4 to 1 mix for germinating. The potting soil should have some perlite in it to start, but for doing germination it's good to add a little extra. No need to add the perlite when moving into the bigger pots.

Horticultural perlite is a lightweight soil conditioner, loosens clay soil, reduces caking, improves drainage and aeration. Blend with peat moss or potting mix for a custom soil-less mix. Can be used to start seeds, propagate cuttings and store bulbs.
 

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