Baby Onion Plants


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On a whim I bought a bunch of onions at our local garden store. There are a whole bunch of baby plants all in a group. Am I supposed to separate these baby plants before I transplant or do I put them in the ground as a group? I usually only do tomatoes so this is new for me.
 
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Separate the plants with care and place in the ground about four to six inches apart.
If the green part height is long cut with scissors to about three inches.
Water lightly just to keep damp until thy start growing in about a week. These plants are very hardy.
 
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Separate the plants with care and place in the ground about four to six inches apart.
If the green part height is long cut with scissors to about three inches.
Water lightly just to keep damp until thy start growing in about a week. These plants are very hardy.
Thank you so much!!!!!
 

Meadowlark

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Can't tell from your info where you are located and thus what type of onion does best in your area...i.e. long day or short day onions.

Here in East Texas I grow about 200 pounds of short day onions each year. Its critical, if you wish to grow the nice bulbs, that you have the proper type of onion for your area. Here in zone 8 we plant short day sets in November and harvest bulbs in the following May.

Yours may or may not make bulbs but even if the wrong type you can harvest for use as green onions. Separate, plant shallow spaced by about 5 inches, and enjoy. I've found that the smaller the sets the better for actually producing large bulbs. Good luck!
 
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Can't tell from your info where you are located and thus what type of onion does best in your area...i.e. long day or short day onions.

Here in East Texas I grow about 200 pounds of short day onions each year. Its critical, if you wish to grow the nice bulbs, that you have the proper type of onion for your area. Here in zone 8 we plant short day sets in November and harvest bulbs in the following May.

Yours may or may not make bulbs but even if the wrong type you can harvest for use as green onions. Separate, plant shallow spaced by about 5 inches, and enjoy. I've found that the smaller the sets the better for actually producing large bulbs. Good luck!
Hi Meadowlark,

I am in southern Wisconsin and the tag on the pot says "Candy Onions". I was at the garden store and picked them up on a whim. which is not the best way to grow a plant, I know. I had a little extra space in my tomato garden and thought it would be nice to have a few onions. I'll be sure to not get my expectations too high for big bulbs and we would be ok with using them as green onions. I'll have to look into it for next year and find out what would be the best type and time of year to plant to get real onions. Thank you!
 

Meadowlark

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Oboegirl,

You did good! The Candy is one of a new variety that is not affected by day length ( or so they say), it is called a day-neutral variety and will form bulbs in the North or South. Great choice!!
 
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I've found that the smaller the sets the better for actually producing large bulbs. Good luck!
You should remember that onion are a bi
Onion sets are a year old.
Their size has no genetic bearing; planting them "too close" is what determines their size, the too-closer, the smaller.
Small ones have a few benefits other than growing large, e.g. they are further from maturity, so are less likely to run to seed prior to bulbing up.
 
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Meadowlark

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Their size has no genetic bearing; planting them "too close" is what determines their size, the too-closer, the smaller.
A lot of things determine the eventual size of the bulb...among them genetics, how deeply they are planted initially, soil fertility, availability of timely water, the soil compaction around the bulb, etc. The size of the set at planting is an important factor....about 1/8 of an inch is ideal, larger is not better in this case.

My best bulb this season was over 4 pounds....and it came from a 1/8 inch set.
 
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Well, that's good to hear! I have to think that the garden store knew that these would be spring transplants and picked them accordingly. Well, this should be fun to see what I can get. My husband just loves grilled onions so maybe we'll be able to grill our own next fall!
 
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A lot of things determine the eventual size of the bulb...among them genetics, how deeply they are planted initially, soil fertility, availability of timely water, the soil compaction around the bulb, etc. The size of the set at planting is an important factor....about 1/8 of an inch is ideal, larger is not better in this case.

My best bulb this season was over 4 pounds....and it came from a 1/8 inch set.
My point was that genetics are irrelevant in the size of the set, not the final bulb size.
 
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11 May 2019 Vadalia Onions
Posted on May 11, 2019 by Durgan
http://durgan.org/2019/May 2019/11 May 2019 Vadalia Onions/HTML/11 May 2019 Vadalia Onions
Purchased some vadalia onion seedlings and planted a row. These grow well and do not have a bite and can be used in sandwiches sliced without the sting. Another type is Walla Walla but my success in growing was not entirely successful. The vidalia keep well in my root cellar. The get about the size of an orange or a bit larger.
 
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