Arborvitae has brown tips/patches

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My arborvitae have brown/beige patches. I didn't notice this 3 weeks ago when I added 3" of compost around them and wondering if adding compost has something to do with it? I did put compost right up to the stem because last winter some of them got uprooted and knocked over during an ice storm, so I wanted to make them more stable. I understand it could be storm damage, but even the arborvitaes that didn't get knocked over have these brown patches. Could it be a fungal disease?
 

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We need a photo of the whole tree to get a better look at it.
 
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here you go. photographed in two sections. thanks
 

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Remove the compost and aerate the soil two inches deep around every tree. Loosen the soil all the way out to the edge under the canopy. The compost is holding too much water and moving the pH causing stress. If the excess moisture stays for too long of a period of time the result will end with a fungus. Holding too much moisture can lead to disease in arborvitae trees. Susceptible to problems from drowning and edema, these plants cannot handle long periods of wet soil.
Fungal pathogens are the disease-causing organisms that result in common arborvitae tree diseases such as blight. For example, the fungal pathogen Kabatina thujae causes kabatina twig blight, a disease that kills the tips and often entire branches of trees.
 
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Remove the compost and aerate the soil two inches deep around every tree. Loosen the soil all the way out to the edge under the canopy. The compost is holding too much water and moving the pH causing stress. If the excess moisture stays for too long of a period of time the result will end with a fungus. Holding too much moisture can lead to disease in arborvitae trees. Susceptible to problems from drowning and edema, these plants cannot handle long periods of wet soil.
Fungal pathogens are the disease-causing organisms that result in common arborvitae tree diseases such as blight. For example, the fungal pathogen Kabatina thujae causes kabatina twig blight, a disease that kills the tips and often entire branches of trees.
Thank you so much. Do I need any kind of anti fungal treatment to save them? Also I did apply wilt proof to them last winter as per my gardeners suggestion. could this have exasperated the edema as well?
 
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If you call your county extension office they can give the best recommendation for your area. Give them a call because they like to help people, that's what they get paid for, plus they are experts.
 
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If you call your county extension office they can give the best recommendation for your area. Give them a call because they like to help people, that's what they get paid for, plus they are experts.
Thanks. they're closed due to covid-19, but suggested via email that it's winter damage/dehydration. funny because now I have two diagnosis requiring opposite treatment. I'll remove the mulch and wait and see.
 

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