Split Pea Soup


Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
214
Reaction score
151
Country
United States
Split Pea Vegetable Soup

Wife cooked a ham bone in the crock pot for 24 hours. Today she added, carrots, onions, celery, split pes, about 12 noon. Soon as carrots cook enough to be soft she will add garden corn. Corn is frozen we microwave it then toss it in the soup. We have lots of frozen onions & red bell peppers. We might add peppers too. -2°f froze some of the tops off the garden carrots. I have been waiting for carrots tops to grow back but the larger 1"diameter carrots are not growing new tops, so I pulled some carrots up for the soup.

100_6862.JPG
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 5, 2020
Messages
266
Reaction score
110
Location
Tri Cities, WA (Columbia Basin)
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
United States
Looks delicious! Compliments to the chef! But looks more like smoked ham hock stew or smoked ham potpie without the crust. Split peas soup in normal culinary terms, means mostly split peas with a much less of the other ingredients and a smoked ham hock or just some ham, cooked in the soup, not added together later. So, the peas cooked down until they disintegrate, thickening the soup, which ends up decidedly green. However I imagine the photo is before cooking. One of my favorite things, along with Pot Roast... and a host of other stuff, some of which many of you would turn your noses up at - I'm with Andrew Zimmern.
 
Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
214
Reaction score
151
Country
United States
Looks delicious! Compliments to the chef! But looks more like smoked ham hock stew or smoked ham potpie without the crust. Split peas soup in normal culinary terms, means mostly split peas with a much less of the other ingredients and a smoked ham hock or just some ham, cooked in the soup, not added together later. So, the peas cooked down until they disintegrate, thickening the soup, which ends up decidedly green. However I imagine the photo is before cooking. One of my favorite things, along with Pot Roast... and a host of other stuff, some of which many of you would turn your noses up at - I'm with Andrew Zimmern.

Wife turned it into vegetable stew. She does the same thing with potato soup.

My mother use to make potato soup, it was boiled potato water with flavor like onions. I hated it. My mother also made bean soup with ham bone and onion it was very good. I made pea soup once many years ago it turned out to be green gravy. LOL

First time wife wanted to cook potato soup I said, my mother use to make that is was horrible.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Apr 5, 2020
Messages
266
Reaction score
110
Location
Tri Cities, WA (Columbia Basin)
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
United States
Sounds good! Corinne makes potato soup on rare occasions - it's good. Guess it depends on what goes in it. Hers has other stuff, including cream and it's thick and has small chunks of potatoes in it. She also make ham and navy bean soup with a smoked ham hock or bacon ends and pieces (I make all our own bacon) and puts rice in it and onion, carrot, celery, may be a little garlic I think. I agree, it's delicious - great for winter evenings. I guess split pea soup is kind of like thick green gravy in a way. Did you leave some for the next day? I always tightens up and gets thicker. We do ours in the slow cooker - long and slow, 4 to 6 hours, more doesn't hurt.

My Mom used to make a beef stew and put yellow split peas in it. She would cook it until the peas were just starting to disintegrate and thicken it. Loved that stuff - it had a delicious unique flavor I have never tasted since - and I was the world's worst picky eater then. Had an epiphany one night when I was at college (In an Indian restaurant in Wales!). Now I'm a regular Andre Zimmern - my culinary hero. Haven't met anything I won't eat yet and as my wife can attest, I have eaten some pretty strange stuff! Not tried Balut yet. Nearly bought some a year or so ago in an Asian market in South Center Mall, Renton (near Seattle, WA). However, the rest of the family I was with were too grossed out by the idea - and some of them are Filipino!

Speaking of flavored water, many years ago over in the UK, my practice wife used to do something that sounds odd, but was actually really good. She was not the world's best cook bless her heart, though she did do some good stuff. Her downfall was substitutions or just leaving out stuff if she didn't have ingredients from recipes... which didn't work. Some things you can get away with, others not so much. Anyway, she used to cook swede (rutabaga/Swedish turnip) and mash it with potatoes, which was really good. But she would season the water it was cooked in with a little black pepper and extra salt if necessary and serve it as an appetizer broth. Sounds crazy, but it was delicious! - and good for us. Did the same with celery root - it think the Brits call it celeriac.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
214
Reaction score
151
Country
United States
Sounds good! Corinne makes potato soup on rare occasions - it's good. Guess it depends on what goes in it. Hers has other stuff, including cream and it's thick and has small chunks of potatoes in it. She also make ham and navy bean soup with a smoked ham hock or bacon ends and pieces (I make all our own bacon) and puts rice in it and onion, carrot, celery, may be a little garlic I think. I agree, it's delicious - great for winter evenings. I guess split pea soup is kind of like thick green gravy in a way. Did you leave some for the next day? I always tightens up and gets thicker. We do ours in the slow cooker - long and slow, 4 to 6 hours, more doesn't hurt.

My Mom used to make a beef stew and put yellow split peas in it. She would cook it until the peas were just starting to disintegrate and thicken it. Loved that stuff - it had a delicious unique flavor I have never tasted since - and I was the world's worst picky eater then. Had an epiphany one night when I was at college (In an Indian restaurant in Wales!). Now I'm a regular Andre Zimmern - my culinary hero. Haven't met anything I won't eat yet and as my wife can attest, I have eaten some pretty strange stuff! Not tried Balut yet. Nearly bought some a year or so ago in an Asian market in South Center Mall, Renton (near Seattle, WA). However, the rest of the family I was with were too grossed out by the idea - and some of them are Filipino!

Speaking of flavored water, many years ago over in the UK, my practice wife used to do something that sounds odd, but was actually really good. She was not the world's best cook bless her heart, though she did do some good stuff. Her downfall was substitutions or just leaving out stuff if she didn't have ingredients from recipes... which didn't work. Some things you can get away with, others not so much. Anyway, she used to cook swede (rutabaga/Swedish turnip) and mash it with potatoes, which was really good. But she would season the water it was cooked in with a little black pepper and extra salt if necessary and serve it as an appetizer broth. Sounds crazy, but it was delicious! - and good for us. Did the same with celery root - it think the Brits call it celeriac.

I love Navy beans. Great Northern beans suck compared to Navy Beans. I don't know why Great Northern beans are so popular probably because not many people have tasted Navy Beans. When my mother tasted Navy Beans for the first time she never cooked Great Northern beans ever again. Funny thing mom started cooking Navy Beans and never told anyone, when family ate her beans they all wanted to know why are these beans so good, we never tasted beans this good, what have you done? Some of the BBQ Baked beans in grocery store cans are Navy Beans. I have never tried Balut either, its popular in other countries.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top