Save your banana peels for your plants !


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Claudine and Annetteb

Thank you both, am glad the information was helpful, think you'll be fine with the drying process, but should you stumble across something I didn't mention, will be very happy to help.

Claudine - would love to know how your little treasures respond, especially as one of my neighbors tried this, on her outdoor roses and they've looked absolutely fantastic all year.:)
 
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I will indeed keep you updated on how things go and if I have anymore questions I will ask. Thanks again for the info.
 
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I always use them on my rose bushes, mainly for fertilizer although I've also heard something about them being good against aphids?

I also have a kalua pork recipe sitting around someplace that uses a banana peel to substitute for ti leaves :)
 
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I think I might try this! I had heard of using leftover coffee grounds before, but never tried it. My concern is that the banana peels might attract animals. I have bunnies in my back yard, as well as lots of stray cats. I might try burying pieces of the peel under the plant, or just set them on the ground near it and hope the animals stay away.
 
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Hi susieeQT - if you are worried that the rotting banana peels would attract unwanted garden visitors or that they would be more than appealing to your current ones :D you could always dry them first and then either cut them up or blend them and use as a mulch around your plants - details of how to dry them are 4 or 5 posts up from yours :)
 
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My banana peels go in my compost and my compost on my plants anyhow. I would not have considered putting the peels directly on the soil. Like the coffee grounds, I would exercise some restraint when placing them directly in the dirt as it may alter the soil too drastically and do some damage to certain plants. I think one of the main reasons for banana peels is that they tend to decompose very quickly as long as they remain moist.
 
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Thanks for posting that video about the uses of banana peels. I had heard something about it but it wasn't that much info. I do eat a lot of bananas so I should have no shortage of snacks for the plants.
 
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Awesome tips, happyflowerlady! I had heard banana peels were very good for plants in general, I actually tried it in the past, I tossed tiny pieces of the banana peel all around the plant pot. I didn't like it at all tho, because the peel was taking to long to blend with the soil and this attracted a few bugs. Next time I will bury the banana peel.
 
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We've talked about banana peel before; I think the thread was making your own fertilizer. I soak banana peel in water to make a foliar spray. It works great for fruiting and flowering plants.

@claudine, the only problem would be if the peel started to attract bugs.
 
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I think you are right there ChanellG in fact I'm more than sure that we have discussed using banana peels as a fertilizer in more than one thread - which in my mind is not a bad thing - as it helps introduce people to this great organic way of fertilizing plants for free.

Although it is true that banana peels can attract unwanted visitors and bugs - it only
happens when they are used in their raw state and as has already been mentioned in this thread - this is not a problem - if you either dry them first or use them as a liquid fertilizer - both of which I have done for some time and have never had any problems with either unwanted visitors or bugs :)
 
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ChanellG, I don't think bugs will be a problem. I always keep my miniature roses indoors and I have a mosquito net in my window, so insects don't have any access to my room:)
I think I should start with little pieces of a banana peel and see if it works for me.
 
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I have been using eggshells and coffee grounds for my plants, but banana peels I've thrown out for what some may find a silly reason, but it is important to me.

I grow everything organically, and what I can't grow, I try to buy organic. Which is more expensive.. go.. I buy regular bananas to save money and buy thin skinned things organic.

I think after reading this thread I will stat buying organic bananas since then I can use the peels, too.
 
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@claudine, you are fortunate you don't have half the problems of people who garden outdoors. There are so many pests from aphids to caterpillars threatening my plants on a given day.

@Meowmie, I don't find it silly at all; I struggle with the same thing, especially when the other people around me aren't as conscientious. It's kind of pointless to be so careful if you're neighbors are spraying chemicals near your plants. Or if a family member doesn't get why you don't want something going into your compost because they don't know where it came from.
 
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Although it is true that banana peels can attract unwanted visitors and bugs - it only happens when they are used in their raw state ...if you either dry them first or use them as a liquid fertilizer - both of which I have done for some time and have never had any problems with either unwanted visitors or bugs :)

I tried drying some in the toaster oven, but it didn't work out so well. I just keep mine in the freezer until I am ready for them. If I have too many I throw them in the compost, though sometimes I will lay peel directly on top the soil of a potted plant. I read that it repels mosquitoes; not sure if that's true, but as long is it helps the plant and doesn't attract other pests, I'm good.
 
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I have heard that bananas are also very nourishing for gardens and I also throw them in my garden every now and then. However, I always get a bad odour from my garden. We throw about 2 peels in the garden and it builds up over time. I am planning on getting a compost bin again as our old one was blown over by the wind and now we have no idea where it is! Also bananas aren't the only things that we throw in there, so overall it gets pretty smelly in there.
 
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ChanellG, I garden outdoors a little too, but I don't have much space and I can't plant everything I want to, because it's my parents' garden. For example, they don't let me plant my beloved poplars:cry:
As for pests, I had a big problem with spider mites last year, I have no idea how they found my miniature roses:confused:. Fortunately, soap was enough to scare them off.
 
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Also bananas aren't the only things that we throw in there, so overall it gets pretty smelly in there.

You can eliminate that odor by putting soil on top of your scraps. If you have a traditional compost bin you might want to keep a leaf pile so you can add in some brown layers as you add your green kitchen scraps. If you're composting in a homemade bin such as a lidded storage tub, you can just dig under the soil and bury new scraps.
 
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I tried drying some in the toaster oven, but it didn't work out so well. I just keep mine in the freezer until I am ready for them. If I have too many I throw them in the compost, though sometimes I will lay peel directly on top the soil of a potted plant. I read that it repels mosquitoes; not sure if that's true, but as long is it helps the plant and doesn't attract other pests, I'm good.


I heard others say the same thing - and although the reason for it not working out - is sometimes either because the drying time was not long enough - which can be anything from 2 to 6 hours or was because the toaster oven didn't work quite as well for this purpose as a conventional oven.

I too have an abundant supply of banana peels - which as there are always plenty left over even after putting some in the compost - is part of the reason why I dry them - as they are easier to store that way.

Although I've never heard of banana peels being used as an actual mosquito repellant - I'm told - but haven't yet tried it myself - that if you rub the inside of a banana peel on a mosquito bite it really does stop the itching :)
 
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@gata montes, for me it was the time factor. I suppose one day in the future I will be able to get myself organized so that I do it overnight, but for now I just keep the excess in the freezer. I was thinking about the peel as mosquito repellent question over the weekend and I considered hanging some around just to see what happens, but I think it rains too much here for that experiment to work, at least until the weather heats up more.
 
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@gata montes, for me it was the time factor. I suppose one day in the future I will be able to get myself organized so that I do it overnight, but for now I just keep the excess in the freezer. I was thinking about the peel as mosquito repellent question over the weekend and I considered hanging some around just to see what happens, but I think it rains too much here for that experiment to work, at least until the weather heats up more.

To be honest - as banana peels make such a good organic fertilizer and are an excellent way of feeding roses and tomatoes - i really don't think it matters which way you choose to use them and is probably more of a matter of - which works best for you - which for me is to only use them as a dried mulch or liquid fertilizer - as otherwise the rotting peels would attract a whole load of unwanted insects and furry visitors to my garden :D

If you do decide to go ahead with the experiment of hanging banana peels around the garden - as a mosquito repellent - would love to know how it goes - especially as I'm a bit skeptical as to whether it work - mind you if it didn't - at least you would have plenty of banana peels at hand - to grab and rub on the bites to stop them itching :D
 

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