Rooting Compound

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Hey There!

Has anyone ever used any sort of rooting compound for rhizomes? I'm currently growing ginger and turmeric indoors. It appears to be doing fairly well, based on the shoots, but because I'm curious, I dug a few pieces up today and saw that they're growing greens and roots but not much in the way of growing rhizomes. In fact, some pieces where I chopped the ginger appear to look a little soft, like they could mold, but I can also see that the skin outer layer is kind of growing around the softer part. The turmeric has only shot up a little, aside from one large piece, and the edges seem to look healthy, and tiny little white nodules are starting to grow.
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When I planted these turmeric and ginger pieces, I waited for them to sprout a little before planting and then put them in soil, as directed from several tutorials. It hasn't even been 2 months since I've planted these, so I may be nervous over nothing, as I know it takes about 10 months for ginger and turmeric to be ready for harvest. I just wondered if anyone had any thoughts on rooting compounds in general, or specifically, in regards to their efficacy on ginger and turmeric.

Thanks!!
 
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I believe rooting compound (at least some types) is pretty nasty stuff and I don't think I'd use it on anything thats intended to be edible. Maybe others would know more about it.
 
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Since your plants have already put up greenery, you don't need rooting compound. as they have plenty of roots. It looks like they could use a little more room to expand, though.
 
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I was thinking like a honey or cinnamon rooting compound. I definitely wouldn't eat the chemical stuff either. I've used it for cuttings that I want to propagate for essential oils, and it works almost too well...scary well. Even the idea of using it for plants for essential oils is a little off-putting to me, because chemical rooting compound is anything but therapeutic.

I repotted them and gave them a little more space, putting cinnamon on top of the soil, to keep gnats away, so maybe that'll help to have cinnamon in the soil. In the process of digging all of these up, carefully pulling them apart, and replanting them, I broke some leaves, but that should be ok, right? Is it ok to trim back the greens, or maybe even beneficial, as it'll allow the plant to put more energy into the root, or does it not work like that with rhizomes?
 

alp

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