Rooting roses in potatoes


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A friend of mine told me that it's possible to propagate roses with potatoes. Unfortunately, he doesn't know any details. Have you ever heard of this method? Can you tell me more about it? I'd love to give it a try! Like most of you already know, I received a beautiful rose a few days ago and I dream of planting it in my garden:love:

As for the method, you have to put a rose cutting in a potato, it looks like this:

IMG_potato_rose.jpg


Has anyone of you tried it?
 
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OMG I saw this on pinterest the other day and thought I had to try it some time : ] Never heard of this before and don't know anyone who tried it but I'm willing to give it a try :) We can compare results ;)
 
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Although I haven't tried it myself and don't plan to either - as I prefer the simpler more successful way of propagating roses - I have heard - that even though its a more involved and not particularly successful way of propagating roses - it does work extremely well in giving you a small crop of potatoes as a bonus :D
 
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Tigress, I'm not sure if I'll do it. I'm only thinking about it:)
I've never had any success with propagating roses, so I feel that I need to find a new method. But I don't want potatoes to grow right next to my roses:(
 
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Well, that looks like a really creative way to propagate roses, that's for sure! Not sure I'd go for it, it sounds kinda risky for the rose cutting, but it would definitely make a great experiment. If you ever try it, Claudine, then let us know how it went! I'm really curious!
 
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I'm wondering if I can plant potatoes in flower pots. If yes, then it's very possible that I'll give this method a try very soon. I want to root my white rose, the one that I show you in the Garden Photography section:)
 
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I'd love to try this with my miniature rose bush! I want more bushes! I may look into this further and see if I can't figure out how to get this started.
 
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Sweetkymom, it's very easy to propagate miniature roses, I did it many times:) All you need to do is to take a cutting with one leaf, put it in soil and wait:) Usually, it takes a few weeks until it starts growing.
 
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I'd love to try this with my miniature rose bush! I want more bushes! I may look into this further and see if I can't figure out how to get this started.

I too would agree with what claudine has said - in that its extremely easy to propagate roses by stem cuttings and usually very successful too :) providing that it is done at the right time of year - which is usually autumn or late winter / early spring and by making sure - that the end of the cutting that is inserted in the soil has plenty of leaf notches and is then kept slightly moist.
Which is a lot simpler than the potato method and more likely to result in multiplying your miniature rose bushes
- unless of course you are wanting a small crop of potatoes rather than some more miniature roses :D
 
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I don't want to sound stupid but... Does propagate mean breed?
Don't worry, there are no stupid questions:) Propagating means that you take a cutting from a rose, put it in a potato, in soil or in water, wait, and after some time you have a new rose bush:)
 
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I don't want to sound stupid but... Does propagate mean breed?


Although I too - do very much agree with what claudine has said in terms of no - it is not a silly a stupid question that you ask and that in this particular instance as we are discussing roses - propagation does mean how to make more rose bushes from just one rose and multiply the number of bushes that you have for free.

However if you are thinking of propagating roses - especially if it is your first time - there are simpler and more effective ways of propagating roses than using a potato - which are more likely to result in multiplying the number of roses that you have - unless of course you are looking to grow a small potato crop rather than increase your rose bushes :D

I would also just like to clarify ( without meaning any offense claudine) that " to propagate " doesn't just apply to roses - but to all plants - as it is a general gardening term - which basically means to produce or make more plants from one single one - with varying methods of doing so :)
 
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A friend of mine told me that it's possible to propagate roses with potatoes. Unfortunately, he doesn't know any details. Have you ever heard of this method? Can you tell me more about it? I'd love to give it a try! Like most of you already know, I received a beautiful rose a few days ago and I dream of planting it in my garden:love:

As for the method, you have to put a rose cutting in a potato, it looks like this:

IMG_potato_rose.jpg


Has anyone of you tried it?

You could take that cutting and dip it into a rooting hormone powder made especially for roses, and the stick in a small pot with growing soil. But keep it inside the house for a week, and then take it outdoors. The soil must remain moist, and in the direct sunlight.
 
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You could take that cutting and dip it into a rooting hormone powder made especially for roses, and the stick in a small pot with growing soil. But keep it inside the house for a week, and then take it outdoors. The soil must remain moist, and in the direct sunlight.


Its actually even much easier than that - particularly as roses root very quickly and easily at any time of the year and the
the best and most commonly used method of propagating roses - is to take 6 - 8 inch healthy stem cuttings and either
insert them directly into the ground where you want them to grow or in pots - keep them lightly moist and out of direct sunlight and within a month - you will find that you have the beginnings of a new rose bush :D

I would however just add - that its not actually necessary to use rooting hormone with roses - as because they actually contain their own natural rooting hormone called " auxin " they normally root very successfully without it.

Although roses will generally root at most times of the year - they are generally more likely to be successful if done at the right time - which is either late winter or early spring - which as this is also the correct time to give roses their yearly prune - means that instead of discarding your cuttings - you can put them to good use instead :)
 
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You could take that cutting and dip it into a rooting hormone powder made especially for roses, and the stick in a small pot with growing soil. But keep it inside the house for a week, and then take it outdoors. The soil must remain moist, and in the direct sunlight.
Actually, I tried this method that you're talking about a few times already. It works great for my miniature rose cuttings. Most of them quickly develop roots:) Unfortunately, I haven't managed to propagate roses from a florist this way yet. This is the reason why I look for new solutions:)
 
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