Onion Growing thread, 2019


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Mine are also getting leggy and the soil dries quite quickly as well.

I read that once the plants reach 5” tall, trim them back to 2” with scissors as it encourages them to grow thicker and stronger. Do you do that?
 
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zigs

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Not done that before but it probably wouldn't hurt, be like encouraging tillering in grasses :)
 
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I sometimes do. I tend to do so when I think there is a danger that the seedlings may get damaged, or be awkward to handle.
I also sometimes cut off the crook, if the seedling bends over too much when sprouting.
Neither does any harm.
 

Meadowlark

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I'm guessing those are long day onions?

Here in Texas I grow short day onions( 1015s) every year and start them in the ground from sets in November and harvest them in May.

Many will produce 2 pound bulbs of the sweetest onions ever. I grow enough to generally last from one planting to the next but this year have already consumed last years crop. I have stored the short days 9-12 months.

Here's my 300 for this year...

49688
 
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I grow a small variety of onions, all from seed, the four varieties already mentioned.
I like strong onions and add sulphur to the beds for pungency. (Epsom Salts)
 
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zigs

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Got some Red Barron and Stutgarter sets today.

Put them in cell trays in the greenhouse, found that if they go out with some root growth already on them it saves having to replant them several times after the birds pull them out.

49988
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Zigs, I had trouble with birds digging up and eating my bean seeds, so I put chicken wire over the bed. The plants could come up just fine through the wire, but it deterred the birds. Would that possibly work for your onions?
 

zigs

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Zigs, I had trouble with birds digging up and eating my bean seeds, so I put chicken wire over the bed. The plants could come up just fine through the wire, but it deterred the birds. Would that possibly work for your onions?
They'd still pull them out thru the wire MG, once they got a bit of root growth they should be fine :)

Said on the radio today that all of the Onion family are good for preventing bowel cancer.
 

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I have a type of wild onion/garlic growing in my yard. I was given them a few years ago by an old lady that lived a couple houses down from me, she has since pasted away. However, these wild onion/garlic plants she gave me not only comeback every year(this time of the year), but are spreading thru out my garden -- I love them....

I wish I would have talked to her more when she was here.

This video quality is not the best, but I think what I have growing in my yard is the same thing...


I love when an elderly person gives us some wisdom and maybe even a plant, seedling, cutting and just great gardening information. I got this beautiful Japanese Maple seedling from an 80 yearly old woman at Colonial Williamsburg. I have since learned it needs to be grafted to a mother stock to be official but none the less it is still beautiful and her wisdom and knowledge were so valuable.!
 
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Meadowlark

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Short day onions may react differently than long days...but to keep short days from bolting I make sure to get them in the ground in November. Waiting later to plant especially Jan., Feb. will result in significant bolting, whereas Nov planting its very rare for any to bolt.
 
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How do you determine when onions are ready? I've got several (too many actually) and some I thought night be ready only had about 1.5" onion. New to growing onions, so I get to ask newbie questions
 

Meadowlark

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How do you determine when onions are ready? I've got several (too many actually) and some I thought night be ready only had about 1.5" onion. New to growing onions, so I get to ask newbie questions
Of course, green onions are ready whenever you are...but if you are raising for the large bulbs, the bulbs stop growing when the tops begin to fall over.
Around here, that starts in early May and continues through May. I harvest all of mine at that time and store them several months until we eat them all.
 
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The roots of onions die back, making the leaves go brown, and the necks go soft, so that they fall over, when they have finished their first year's growth and they are ready for us to harvest
 
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The roots of onions die back, making the leaves go brown, and the necks go soft, so that they fall over, when they have finished their first year's growth and they are ready for us to harvest
So nearly a full year!? Mine are almost all bent at half mast, I'll try and get pics later. I have them at various stages as some were seedlings purchased from the big box and some were sets (mini bulbs) from a different big box planted a bit later. I still have some in storage that I could plant if it's not too late to get a late harvest. My garden is a disorganized mess right now though. Need to plan out locations better so I don't end up with a little bit of this and that all over!
 

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