Neighbours grass impinging into my gravel garden


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I have a gravelled garden , my neighbour has grass. There is an iron fence separating but their grass is growing into my garden. I’m wanting to put some sort of small edging along the bottom on the fence to stop it growing into mine. What can I use ?
Since you apparently don't want plants of any type growing through your gravel why not get a bunch of rock salt or ice cream salt and pour it directly under the fence and into your gravel. Salt will stop anything from growing there for years. I am not sure if a barrier will work because I am not sure your neighbors actually have grass. It looks like different types of weeds and some grasses and weeds spread by underground runners. You don't really know how deep to place a barrier but hardware stores sell all kinds of edging products. You could use a herbicide on the weeds and grass that is coming up elsewhere in your garden. Salt will leech through the soil and affect your plants if they are downhill from where you placed the salt.
 
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Anything that will kill grass at that frontier will leach into your neighbor's lawn. Once you make him an enemy, life will change. Continuous 4" high plastic or metal barriers are what works. It comes in rolls 25 ft. or so. It it's corregated, that means it's made of less strong material that will degenerate more quickly. It needs to be sunk about 3" deep and still have 1 or 2 inches sticking out of the ground. Otherwise, the grass will go under or over or both. Anything that has seams, like a row of bricks, will have grass growing in-between them in no time flat and require hand pulling. Aluminum is better than plastic if your ground freezes because the plastic will be extruded a little with each freeze/thaw cycle. Nothing is cheap or easy.
 
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Over fertilize it and burn it. Roundup is litigious these days, yet hope springs eternal. No fault in a dumbass effort to improve a property. Better luck a few years from now. And add some salt.
 
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Yeah they are having a tough time proving a poison is safe fir consumption. What kills a plant hormone wise can be called unbridled growth, and in humans we call that a cancer. Right now lawyers are sueing because the product works and the workers were not protected enough in a bubble. Then the lawsuits where the product was used as a dissicant leads to poisoning of the consuming population will come. Those companies do not have insurance enough to cover that and will fail. The chemistry will continue to exist however, and be improved.
 
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I've used R-U for many years, I can't remember not using it. It only has one problem for me: it will migrate, so you need to not "edge" an area with it. I had a problem with a neighbor's grass in my garden, used it, and it irregularly migrated across the fence line. We we enemies for the next 15 years until I moved. He was not a nice guy, but I aggravated the situation.
 
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I have a gravelled garden , my neighbour has grass. There is an iron fence separating but their grass is growing into my garden. I’m wanting to put some sort of small edging along the bottom on the fence to stop it growing into mine. What can I use ?
If you want to stop the invasion you need to put in a barrier it will have to go at least 6" deep. It can be of any weather resistant material. Thin plastic boarder will work. Remember you will have to cut the grass that would want to creep over the top unless you kept the top edge up a few inches above the ground.
 

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