Magnolia?


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Kind of looks like a pink saucer, but the blooms are more red than the pink saucer I had at the last house and this has a lot more stems. Obviously it has been kept short, so hard to tell there. Beautiful blooms though.

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yes a Magnolia type. I have Magnolia trees with that same color flower. I also have two star Magnolias which are cream white flowers. If I were to look it up, I would google, Magnolia shrub to find the name. as you can see there are many coming out of the ground, NOT a dedicated trunk--so that would rule out a tree type. Also, the width of the flower is good to use when looking up the type. As some large ones are considered saucer flowers, because their flower are that large. happy hunting.

anyone ever see what is called "Teddy Bear Magnolia" its wonderful, big dark red velvet leaves and large pink flowers.

Have looked up the species years ago, lots of types.
 
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Recently I saw a Magnolia bush that had flowers the exact color of a magnolia tree.
 
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The top photo pink flowering tree is the saucer Magnolia, Magnolia xsoulangiana
 
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I agree that among Magnolia I am familiar with, this does look most like Magnolia x 'Ann'. It is blooming earlier than is usually expected, but perhaps February would be the normal time in Florida.
Magnolia x 'Ann' is a hybrid of Magnolia liliiflora ‘Nigra’ and Magnolia stellata ‘Rosea’. Magnolia x 'Ann' was introduced by the U.S. National Arboretum in 1962, as one of eight cultivars ("The Girls") that were selected for later bloom time in order to avoid frost damage.
 

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