Looking for Bamboo that is non-invasive, grows well and fast in partial-sun.

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We're looking for a variety of bamboo that grows well and fast in partial sun, and that is also non-invasive (i.e. "clumping").

The idea being placing several cuttings in concrete plants - 1-1/2-feet to 2-feet deep - and letting it just grow
to form a nice high wall. Even though desired bamboo should be non-invasive, we still want it contained to a growing space.

Ideas/suggestions are appreciated.
 
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We're looking for a variety of bamboo that grows well and fast in partial sun, and that is also non-invasive (i.e. "clumping").

The idea being placing several cuttings in concrete plants - 1-1/2-feet to 2-feet deep - and letting it just grow
to form a nice high wall. Even though desired bamboo should be non-invasive, we still want it contained to a growing space.

Ideas/suggestions are appreciated.
We were able to resolve this by growing the bamboo in planters.
 
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We're looking for a variety of bamboo that grows well and fast in partial sun, and that is also non-invasive (i.e. "clumping").

The idea being placing several cuttings in concrete plants - 1-1/2-feet to 2-feet deep - and letting it just grow
to form a nice high wall. Even though desired bamboo should be non-invasive, we still want it contained to a growing space.

Ideas/suggestions are appreciated.
We purchased bamboo plants in early summer due to neighbours building a 'viewing deck' that peered into our garden. Phyllostachys-aurea was recommended (cold, uk climate - isn't too bothered by winds). It's one of the least spreading varieties.

We have ours planted in large containers and so far they are doing brilliantly. I think we got them in late June (not from the place linked to) - we planted them up into containers 4 or more times the size and already they've spread to fill the pots. Lush, green and healthy. Time will tell how well they cope with winter - we plan on insulating the pots to prevent freezing.

 
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There is at least one variety of bamboo that is clumping but does not put out runner and spread. Forget where I saw it a few years ago, but an one line search should find it. That being said the DEEP planter is good - or do both. Just make sure it's deeper than the bamboo root runners.
 
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The good news is that are some varieties that are "well behaved." This was a three-foot high and about eighteen inches in diameter, clump half-way down our long border, thirty years ago.
I dug it up and chopped it up into lots of small clumps of two or three canes. Then planted it as a screen, along our back fence.
It still is only nine inches to a foot deep. It doesn't send out rhizomes. It has spread sideways, filling up the gaps between the clumps.
However, it does need support, there are lateral wires at three and five feet, to stop it falling over. It's about eight feet high.

P1060191.JPG


The bad news is that I've no idea of the variety, as it was self seeded.
 
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We purchased bamboo plants in early summer due to neighbours building a 'viewing deck' that peered into our garden. Phyllostachys-aurea was recommended (cold, uk climate - isn't too bothered by winds). It's one of the least spreading varieties.

We have ours planted in large containers and so far they are doing brilliantly. I think we got them in late June (not from the place linked to) - we planted them up into containers 4 or more times the size and already they've spread to fill the pots. Lush, green and healthy. Time will tell how well they cope with winter - we plan on insulating the pots to prevent freezing.

Thankyou. :)
 
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The good news is that are some varieties that are "well behaved." This was a three-foot high and about eighteen inches in diameter, clump half-way down our long border, thirty years ago.
I dug it up and chopped it up into lots of small clumps of two or three canes. Then planted it as a screen, along our back fence.
It still is only nine inches to a foot deep. It doesn't send out rhizomes. It has spread sideways, filling up the gaps between the clumps.
However, it does need support, there are lateral wires at three and five feet, to stop it falling over. It's about eight feet high.

View attachment 93416

The bad news is that I've no idea of the variety, as it was self seeded.
Absolutely beautiful. :)
 

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