Indoor Meyer Lemon Tree Help

Joined
Feb 23, 2023
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Location
South Dakota
Country
United States
Hello. I was wondering if anyone had some tips or similar experiences with their indoor Meyer lemon tree. Our tree had been dying due to lack of sunlight (we live in a state where winters are harsh) so I’d purchased led lights in January. Since then our tree has had a lot of blossoming flowers. However once the flowers get to full bloom and begin trying to produce a lemon the flowers have been becoming brown and brittle and eventually fall off the tree.

I’m new to lemon trees (and indoor trees in general) so I was wondering if this is normal for the first year with the tree and if there is anything I can do so that we can get some lemons.

(The tree gets watered usually ever 2-3 days and gets 12 hours of led light plus the natural light outside but no direct sunlight. I also don’t use any fertilizers.)

Thank you for any help.
 

Attachments

  • 240369AB-2894-4579-994E-3247495D0DC4.jpeg
    240369AB-2894-4579-994E-3247495D0DC4.jpeg
    135.6 KB · Views: 9
  • 503ABA12-2C01-4969-89A3-741630BE65F4.jpeg
    503ABA12-2C01-4969-89A3-741630BE65F4.jpeg
    73.1 KB · Views: 8
  • B32BA2ED-69CC-48E1-857A-E18757A4B7FF.jpeg
    B32BA2ED-69CC-48E1-857A-E18757A4B7FF.jpeg
    123.3 KB · Views: 8
  • 9064CFAD-B213-4344-9249-BC5F9AEC59E9.jpeg
    9064CFAD-B213-4344-9249-BC5F9AEC59E9.jpeg
    124.3 KB · Views: 10
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
11,488
Reaction score
5,591
Location
La Porte Texas
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
The reason the blooms are falling off and the fruit never gets bigger than pea size is because the blooms are not being pollinated. Indoors = no insects so it will have to be done by hand with a tiny paint brush. Your tree is super leggy and lacking in sufficient foliage, meaning it is not getting anywhere close to enough light. All plants need food so start fertilizing or very soon what leaves you do have will start to turn yellow and fall off and this will lead to eventual death.

When temperatures stay above about 50F you can move the plant outside.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 13, 2019
Messages
1,589
Reaction score
605
Location
Riverside/Pomona CA
Hardiness Zone
9
Country
United States
When you put it out for the Summer it will get enough light to produce more flowers that will be pollinated and produce fruit in the Fall. Around here they produce all year long, so you should be able to get some fruit in late Summer through Fall.
 
Joined
Jul 18, 2022
Messages
223
Reaction score
26
Location
Newyork
Country
United States
It's great that you're trying to provide your indoor Meyer lemon tree with enough light through the use of LED lights! However, there are a few factors that could be causing the flowers to turn brown and fall off before producing fruit. Here are some potential causes and solutions:
  • Lack of pollination - Indoor citrus trees rely on pollinators like bees to transfer pollen from the male to the female flowers in order to produce fruit. If your tree is not getting enough natural light, it may not be attracting enough pollinators. Try hand-pollinating the flowers by gently brushing the stamen of a male flower against the stigma of a female flower with a small brush or Q-tip.
  • Overwatering - While Meyer lemon trees require regular watering, overwatering can cause root rot and lead to flower drop. Make sure the soil is well-draining and allow the top inch of soil to dry out before watering again.
  • Nutrient deficiencies - Meyer lemon trees require certain nutrients to produce healthy fruit. Consider adding a citrus-specific fertilizer to the soil to ensure your tree is getting the nutrients it needs.
  • Lack of humidity - Citrus trees prefer moderate to high humidity levels, so make sure your tree is getting enough moisture. You can increase the humidity by placing a tray of water near the tree or using a humidifier.
  • Temperature fluctuations - Citrus trees are sensitive to temperature changes. Make sure the tree is not near any drafts or heating/cooling vents, and keep the room temperature relatively consistent.
By addressing these potential issues, you may be able to encourage your Meyer lemon tree to produce fruit. Remember that it can take up to a year or two for an indoor citrus tree to produce fruit, so be patient and keep caring for your tree!

For more info check out the following resource

The Brainy Gardener is an online gardening resource that provides practical, real-life tips, tutorials and inspiration for novice and expert gardeners alike.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
26,770
Messages
258,175
Members
13,336
Latest member
texc16195

Latest Threads

Top