I HATE TEXAS - pepper weevils/maggots!!!!


Meadowlark

Gardner, Angler, Adjunct Professor, and Rancher
Joined
Feb 5, 2019
Messages
258
Reaction score
246
Location
East Texas
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
I have to admit, the thread title was very much counter to my personal beliefs.

I Love Texas. I love everything about it, including the challenges of growing terrific veggies in our climate.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
It wasn't a 'personal' attack against anyone and I don't think anyone should be taking it that way - but its a free country.

There should be, at the least, an internet link on the labels of these plants to help new gardeners have a clue about what could happen, how best to prepare for it, and what to do if it happens - but who am I to say.

I've lived in a lot of States in this Country and there aint no perfect one.

Had to work in Seattle for a year back in the day - met a girl and started hanging with her - she swore Seattle was the best place on Earth, and talked about every other place there was as if they were poison. One day out of the clear blue sky I just happened to ask her what other States she's visited, hoping to get her to talk about something nice about it - she said she'd never been out of the State.

Stopped hanging with her.

I've seen beauty and ugly - every place I ever lived.

Back to gardening!
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,261
Reaction score
3,548
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Well - I was going to revise the title of the thread but it is too late, no edit option.

I don't hate Texas but gardening here does take some gettin used to...

Hope I didn't offend anyone.
Didn't bother me none. It's the truth. If it can happen it will and more often than most folks believe.
 
Joined
May 7, 2019
Messages
222
Reaction score
42
Location
Timspon, Texas
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
Well - I was going to revise the title of the thread but it is too late, no edit option.

I don't hate Texas but gardening here does take some gettin used to...

Hope I didn't offend anyone.
I live in Texas, and I'm not fond of my area either....especially my backyard!! So, join the club! :)
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Honestly - what ticked me off was reading about these horrible creatures in the pepper, and finding almost NO sensible information about them, leaving me thinking that all the peppers were toast (you can't kill the creatures once you have them) - I was pretty - you know...

I've grown hundred of bell and hot peppers in my life before moving here - NEVER seen anything like the ET's in that pepper.

Don't get me started on the humidity! o_O
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,261
Reaction score
3,548
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Honestly - what ticked me off was reading about these horrible creatures in the pepper, and finding almost NO sensible information about them, leaving me thinking that all the peppers were toast (you can't kill the creatures once you have them) - I was pretty - you know...

I've grown hundred of bell and hot peppers in my life before moving here - NEVER seen anything like the ET's in that pepper.

Don't get me started on the humidity! o_O
Not to worry. Wait 5 minutes and the weather will change.. If you think the humidity is bad where you live you should move to Houston. I lived between Houston and Galveston for a few years and tried to grow sauce tomatoes commercially. I finally sold out. The humidity is so bad there that fungus is a MAJOR factor. I learned about fungus though.
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Geez I went to Houston once and almost died from the humidity - I guess I tried to forget it! :D

Maks me wonder how on Earth the early settlers survived - no A/C, no running water (no shower), no refrigerated water... But now I know why the Comanche were so... good at what they did.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,261
Reaction score
3,548
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Geez I went to Houston once and almost died from the humidity - I guess I tried to forget it! :D

Maks me wonder how on Earth the early settlers survived - no A/C, no running water (no shower), no refrigerated water... But now I know why the Comanche were so... good at what they did.
Ever heard of the Karankawa (sp)? The Comanches were terrified of them and with good reason. They were cannibals. They ate their captives. And they lived on the coast.
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Ever heard of the Karankawa (sp)? The Comanches were terrified of them and with good reason. They were cannibals. They ate their captives. And they lived on the coast.
I've actually done quite a bit of reading about the Comanche and definitely read about the Karankawa and Comanche hatred of them for their cannibalism. Kinda funny when you think about the Comanche would sometimes tie a captive to a spit and slow roast them till they popped and then laugh their butts off about it...

The stories I read of settlers that became Comanche captives - and one story in particular of a woman shot through the chest with an arrow, played dead, Comanche abducted her son, then a Comache came back to 'make sure' she was dead and "wiggled the arrow around a bit to see if she flinched" (she did NOT), and she lived and walked a bunch of miles to a neighbor's house with an arrow sticking through her.... geez.

They weren't teaching us about that in elementary school...
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,261
Reaction score
3,548
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
I've actually done quite a bit of reading about the Comanche and definitely read about the Karankawa and Comanche hatred of them for their cannibalism. Kinda funny when you think about the Comanche would sometimes tie a captive to a spit and slow roast them till they popped and then laugh their butts off about it...

The stories I read of settlers that became Comanche captives - and one story in particular of a woman shot through the chest with an arrow, played dead, Comanche abducted her son, then a Comache came back to 'make sure' she was dead and "wiggled the arrow around a bit to see if she flinched" (she did NOT), and she lived and walked a bunch of miles to a neighbor's house with an arrow sticking through her.... geez.

They weren't teaching us about that in elementary school...
I wonder if any female today could do that? They didn't teach us anything truthful about the Indians.
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
I wonder if any female today could do that? They didn't teach us anything truthful about the Indians.
I wonder if ANYONE today could survive that?

Empire of The Summer Moon - fantastic book.

Plenty Coups - Chief of The Crow - one of top 3 books I've ever read. He was one seriously wise person. I highly recommend.
 

Meadowlark

Gardner, Angler, Adjunct Professor, and Rancher
Joined
Feb 5, 2019
Messages
258
Reaction score
246
Location
East Texas
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
There should be, at the least, an internet link on the labels of these plants to help new gardeners have a clue about what could happen, how best to prepare for it, and what to do if it happens - but who am I to say.

...
Let me get this straight...you want an internet link placed on every veggie plant you purchase telling you what could happen and how to prepare for it? LOL. Imagine what that would costo_O

LOL!
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
A link to a web page with a brief but concise "outline" would not take much effort, and would not cost very much. I am sure they could get experienced gardeners to help in the effort for very low cost. If Google can map the entire world, the plant companies could do it...
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
3,647
Reaction score
3,379
Location
Birmingham Alabama
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
Let me get this straight...you want an internet link placed on every veggie plant you purchase telling you what could happen and how to prepare for it? LOL. Imagine what that would costo_O

LOL!
Just imagine the accuracy! A yes no answer to two conditions where each condition has a yes or no is 2x2=4 outcomes. The multitude of soil conditions x the climatactic choices x nutrition x plant variation alone would require @Chuck to overexert hisself.
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Who in the F ever heard of a pepper weevil before moving to Texas? Or Pierce's Disease or the fact that your only safe choice for grapes in Texas is Muscadines, or that it is foolhardy to try and grow blueberries here because the soil is in no way acid enough and trying to make, and keep it so, is a losing proposition?

But you're right - it's better to let the plant-sellers walk off with lots of unsuspecting folk's $15.00 lest the plant-sellers have to go out and get a job at Walmart...

Maybe we stooges should just forget gardening altogether and just write a $200 check to an entitled gardener eery time we get the urge to grow something in a new location?
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,261
Reaction score
3,548
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Lets talk tomatoes and what can affect them. Now all of these are just off of the top of my head and not nearly all of the problems one might encounter. Anthracnose, early and late blight, mildew, mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus, cucumber mosaic virus, potato virus, leaf roll virus, spotted leaf wilt virus, canker, bacterial speck, bacterial spot, aphids and the diseases they carry, leaf hopper and their diseases, white fly, thrips, mites, caterpillars of all kinds, pin worms, maggots, stink bugs, beetles, wilts, both fusarium and verticillium and the list goes on. Other vegetables have other diseases and other insects that attack them
I feel @The Zen Master frustration but I don't think a link is the answer and I also don't know what is. There is just so many things interacting with each other such as temperature and moisture that would make any link immaterial.
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Thanks Chuck - you are correct about the frustration! According to some of what I have been able to find - lots of folks, in fact, plant hot peppers around the perimeter or very close to their tomato gardens, because pepper weevils LOVE hot peppers! ;)

My initial readings led me to believe the entire crop was toast - not that I have a "crop."

PS - the cannibals were the Tonkawa, not the Karankawa! Cracked open one of my books last night to confirm. Comanche hated them very much for their cannibalism and would dismember them and toss the still living stumps in a bon fire and watch them try to worm their way out and all that...

You can read about Tonkawa cannibalism here: http://nativeamericanindianstories.com/tonkawas/
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,261
Reaction score
3,548
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Thanks Chuck - you are correct about the frustration! According to some of what I have been able to find - lots of folks, in fact, plant hot peppers around the perimeter or very close to their tomato gardens, because pepper weevils LOVE hot peppers! ;)

My initial readings led me to believe the entire crop was toast - not that I have a "crop."
My dealings with the Pepper Maggot is that it is a short term problem. The fly is only around a fairly shot time span, in the spring. In the spring peppers are just getting started, especially hot peppers. The fly may affect a couple of peppers on the plant but it cannot affect peppers that are not there yet. I also find that they like sweet peppers too. Us old tough Texans just eat around where the maggot has been. He really doesn't eat all that much.:D
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
143
Reaction score
11
Location
Cedar Creek, TX
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
My dealings with the Pepper Maggot is that it is a short term problem. The fly is only around a fairly shot time span, in the spring. In the spring peppers are just getting started, especially hot peppers. The fly may affect a couple of peppers on the plant but it cannot affect peppers that are not there yet. I also find that they like sweet peppers too. Us old tough Texans just eat around where the maggot has been. He really doesn't eat all that much.:D
Whew - for a minute there I thought you were going to say that you tough old Texans just EAT the maggots! :D
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top