Hibiscus as a tree


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I love hibiscus but don't really have a place for a hedge. Recently I saw a thing about using it as a standard instead.

Has anyone here tried this? Is it difficult to do?
 
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Yes you can grow any Hibiscus as a tree, either by training it yourself or buying one, from your local garden store.

If you wish to train a shrub yourself into a tree, it is relatively easy to do, by selecting a strong stem and continually removing the lower branches. You will also have to keep pinching the tips out of the top growth, in order to get the top to branch out and stop it from flowering, as you don't want to let it flower until it has reached the desired height and shape, that you require. You will need to stake it right from the start in order to keep it growing upright. :)

The two Hibiscus most commonly found in your area are the Tropical one H.Rosa Sinensis or H.Syriacus, the Tropical one is a bit more frost prone, so may need some winter protection and both may require some afternoon shade if you are in an area that receives long hours of very hot sun.

Here are a couple of examples for you to enjoy :)

Hibiscus tree blue.jpg


Both pictures are of Hibiscus Syriacus which are slightly more woody than the tropical variety of Hibiscus.

Hibiscus blue,pink,white.jpg


This one would be a little more tricky to train and is probably best purchased from your local garden store. :D
Just realized I forgot to say that, once you've removed the lower branches, whenever you see new buds form on the trunk, it is best to rub them off with your fingers rather than take the secateurs to them.
 
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View attachment 1115

This one would be a little more tricky to train and is probably best purchased from your local garden store. :D
Just realized I forgot to say that, once you've removed the lower branches, whenever you see new buds form on the trunk, it is best to rub them off with your fingers rather than take the secateurs to them.
That plaited one is gorgeous. I've created something similar, but much smaller, using three different varieties of Ficus Benjamina (different leaf colours) but I've never seen it done with a flowering plant. I'd love to create something similar, but because of space constraints I'd need to use something that gets smaller flowers.
 
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I had a beautiful lush hybiscus for years. As to the trees, I saw them in nurseries. How can anyone top not only gata montes advice but the great pictures as well. I think I want to take the challenge not because of space but just te beauty of the tree. I can see the twisted one may be tough, but my plants have always been forgiving of my best efforts.
 
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Wow, I didn't think about plaiting but that looks great. I also didn't know they came in purple. I'm used to red, pink, and white.
 
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Gata montes, the Hibiscus in the second picture looks so pretty. I love the colors of the flowers! Usually, I'm not a big fan of plants that don't look natural (like bonsai trees or plants grown upside down), but this one is exceptional. I would like to have it in my garden:)
 
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Those are beautiful! We had some trees like that in the yard where I grew up. They are also commonly called Rose of Sharon here. They are a much hardier variety than the typical tropical hibiscus. I love them!
 
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Usually, I'm not a big fan of plants that don't look natural (like bonsai trees or plants grown upside down), ...
It makes me sad to read that because the aim of the bonsai artist is supposed to be to create something that looks like a miniature of the trees one sees in nature. However many don't, so I get what you're saying.
 
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Gata montes, the Hibiscus in the second picture looks so pretty. I love the colors of the flowers! Usually, I'm not a big fan of plants that don't look natural (like bonsai trees or plants grown upside down), but this one is exceptional. I would like to have it in my garden:)
I don't know, nature can come up with some pretty unlikely looking things! ;)
 
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Gata montes, the Hibiscus in the second picture looks so pretty. I love the colors of the flowers! Usually, I'm not a big fan of plants that don't look natural (like bonsai trees or plants grown upside down), but this one is exceptional. I would like to have it in my garden:)

Thats my favorite too, I love both the flowers and the twisted trunk. :) Am surprised you don't like bonsai trees, as some of them are magnificent.

I'm very curious as to what you mean by plants grown upside down :D
 
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As you are all enjoying the pictures of the Hibiscus so much, here are few more examples that can also be grown as a tree, but this time the Tropical variety.

Prema & Hibiscus 015.JPG


double_bloom_hibiscus_by_madmc97-d6a2qx1.jpg

The double bloomed come in an assortment of colors

Hibisucs pink and purple.jpg


This particular Hibiscus will appeal to those of you who like reddish purple foliage.

There are just so many color choices for these beautiful plants, that it would be very easy to just keep adding more and more :) enjoy.
 
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It makes me sad to read that because the aim of the bonsai artist is supposed to be to create something that looks like a miniature of the trees one sees in nature. However many don't, so I get what you're saying.
I find bonsai trees really pretty, but, I don't know why exactly, in some ways I always feel sorry for them, because I think that they would prefer to grow big and free, without their branches being twisted and cut. On the other hand, I'm aware that many plants like to be pruned and that it's good for them.
Thats my favorite too, I love both the flowers and the twisted trunk. :) Am surprised you don't like bonsai trees, as some of them are magnificent.

I'm very curious as to what you mean by plants grown upside down :D
Here is a thread about plants grown upside down: https://www.gardening-forums.com/threads/upside-down-garden-anyone.344/page-3#post-11269

In general, I agree that bonsai trees are magnificent. They just don't look happy to me. But maybe it's just me being weird:p
 
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I find bonsai trees really pretty, but, I don't know why exactly, in some ways I always feel sorry for them, because I think that they would prefer to grow big and free, without their branches being twisted and cut. On the other hand, I'm aware that many plants like to be pruned and that it's good for them.
One of the members of my bonsai club has a good answer to people who say that the art of bonsai is cruel. He always tells those people that bonsai trees often live a lot longer than similar trees do in nature. The reason being that they have all their needs taken care of - plenty of food and water - while trees in nature often don't get as much nutrition as they need.

Of course without a lot of loving care, a bonsai tree may be very unhappy.
 
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I didn't know that they live longer than trees in nature. This is good to know:) I guess it's the same with some animals that live longer lives when we tame them.
Don't get me wrong, I don't think that people should stop growing bonsai trees. After all, I grow my roses indoors and I often prune them too.
 
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claudine sometimes the trees used for bonsai wouldn't even be alive anymore if they hadn't been turned into bonsai. The chairman of our club has a wonderful Trident Maple bonsai that was found abandoned at the side of the road many years ago. And old unwanted hedges make really good bonsai material. Of course those trees are more suitable for big strong men :( but I've rescued a few trees that have come up in my garden or pots as weeds. Last week I dug up a whole clump of trees that had planted themselves next to the telephone pole on our pavement, in a small gap between a wall and a brick driveway. If they'd been left to grow big they could have done a lot of damage, but in pots they should be fine. Now I'm just waiting to see if they survive.
 
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Gina145, I hope that your trees will survive!:) It always makes me very happy when I hear about rescued plants:) My parents cut most trees that had grown in our garden, it was really heartbreaking. I'm sure that it would be better, if they were turned into bonsais.
 
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Thanks claudine. None of them had leaves when I dug them up (as the garden service had recently hacked them back to stumps) but several of them are starting to bud and one has several leaves, so I'm hopeful that the roots are growing back too. The strange part is that the one I thought was most likely to survive is the one that now looks most likely to die.
 
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Claudine - See what you mean, I can fully understand why you don't like 'upside down plants'.
Not only do those tomatoes look butt ugly and a very strange color, but they appear to be growing out of what looks like a standard lamp :( I think this is a time, when even you would agree those tomatoes are not 'pretty' :D
 
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Yup, they aren't pretty at all. Also, call me old-fashioned if you want to, but I don't like anything that looks too weird or very modern. I guess I should have been born two centuries ago, I think that back then everything was prettier:)
 
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I love hibiscus but don't really have a place for a hedge. Recently I saw a thing about using it as a standard instead.

Has anyone here tried this? Is it difficult to do?
Hibiscus can grow as a tree. Sometimes, it can get pretty tall. No matter how you grow it, hibiscus is a beautiful plant.
 

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