Climbing plant for wall

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Im a rookie When it comes to plants and gardening. My home has two stacked stone retaining walls. Each roughly 15 feet long and 10 feet high and decending to ground level. I'd like to dress these walls up and thought some sort of flowering climbing plant could be grown at the base of the walls that would spread up. I'm located in Buffalo, NY. Do you have any suggestions as to a specific kind of plant I could grow?
 

alp

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Don't know your hardiness. But I think star jasmine or confederation jasmine is very popular in America... or clematis..
 

alp

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A big welcome to the forum.. Hope you enjoy being here!
 

MaryMary

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@alp, Buffalo, NY would be zone 6. :)


@Castlesave, Welcome to the forum! :)

You'll have to do some research, some of these are invasive, and I don't know what kind of light the area gets, but you could try a Trumpet vine. Or a perennial Sweet Pea (Lathyrus latifolius). Maybe a Virginia Creeper or Climbing Hydrangea? American Bittersweet?

Ooh, what about Coral honeysuckle, (also called trumpet honeysuckle, or scarlet honeysuckle.) (Lonicera sempervirens) That's pretty! :love:
 
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Hi! :)

All great suggestions but my pick would be Clematis, huge choice of flowers and sizes (some varieties grow over 10' tall). They do like sun though.

http://www.whiteflowerfarm.com/how-to-grow-clematis-vines

Do you have a good garden center (NOT big box store) near you? That would be the place to visit to see what grows best in your region.
 
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Welcome castlesave. Your first concern in looking for a climber vine, should be that it will not do damage to the structure it is growing on. With that said, my first choice would be Climbing hydrangea as MaryMary stated above. Trumpet vine can and will find the tiniest crack, and eventually destroy your wall. Many other vines could be considered invasive, so you would have to check to see if you are allowed to plant them. In many forested areas, honeysuckle is not allowed. The birds ingest the seeds, and poop them out in unwanted areas. Good luck, and let us know what you decide.
 

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If you're looking for clematis, try to find out those which bear both double and single flowers in one plants.. Apparently, they now have more choices.. I have one Vivien Pennell which has snow white single and double..
 
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Born and raised in BNY. I would suggest Virginia creeper. It grows fast and unlike ivy wont hurt the wall that's growing on. Its the same stuff you see along the thruway growing on the walls. The downside is that it doesn't flower.
 
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We have a trumpet vine growing on the trees at work. Can I take a cutting and plant it in a pot with a trellis for it?
 

alp

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Born and raised in BNY. I would suggest Virginia creeper. It grows fast and unlike ivy wont hurt the wall that's growing on. Its the same stuff you see along the thruway growing on the walls. The downside is that it doesn't flower.

But the colour is gorgeous!
 

alp

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We have a trumpet vine growing on the trees at work. Can I take a cutting and plant it in a pot with a trellis for it?

Should do.. But I have never tried. Just get a long string of material and have a go!
 

mg guy

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take a look at Brushwood nursery-clematis is their specialty-I just purchased some 'Hyde Hall' from them for the new fence. It's on the backside of this pic, still small, but will make a good climber in months to come!
 

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MaryMary

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We have a trumpet vine growing on the trees at work. Can I take a cutting and plant it in a pot with a trellis for it?

Be careful, @tbendl... It is pretty and hummingbirds and butterflies love it ... but they are very invasive.:cautious: Pull the seed pods before they pop open!! :eek:

http://www.hgtv.com/outdoors/flowers-and-plants/groundcover-and-vines/trumpet-vine-will-grow-on-you
Native to the Southeast, trumpet vine (Campis radicans) is a large, vigorous deciduous vine prized for its showy trumpet-shaped flowers that bloom in varying shades of red, orange or yellow. This woody plant is so aggressive it’s considered invasive in some regions. As its beautiful flowers fade, they produce large seed pods which, as they dry and split, drop hundreds of seeds, sending up suckers. As summer days heat up, the vine puts out large numbers of tendrils that reach for anything in sight and will grow into thick woody vines within no time.

For that reason, be sure to give this vine substantial support, such as a strong wooden arbor. Never plant it near a house or other building – unless, of course, you don’t mind it being swallowed up.

Trumpet vine adapts to almost any soil, except heavy and wet ones, and is drought-tolerant. Because it blooms on new wood, prune it in the spring after flowering, and it may require a heavy (as in brutal) pruning every couple of years. If you’re really concerned about its invasiveness, consider the variety ‘Madame Galen’ which is a little less hardy and grows slower than most others.

For all its disadvantages, trumpet vine – also known as “cow itch vine” and “hummingbird vine” – is one popular perennial. One side benefit is that its brightly colored blooms attract hummingbirds, and many birds love to nest in its dense dark green foliage.


More to read here, also.
https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_cara2.pdf
 
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Yeah I am thinking for the sunroom maybe. It would be cool to have a vine all the way up and across the ceiling. I could hang those sticky hooks and let it go. Does anyone know if I have to dig it out or how I would transplant some of it?
 

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