Basil with Fusarium Wilt?


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Hi all,

I was wondering if you can help me diagnose my Basil? I'm a relatively new gardener, and confined entirely to pot plants due to living in an apartment.

From what I can google, it may be some type of Fusarium Wilt, which I am told is a bacteria and I should eradicate it immediately and sterilise my pots.

I've isolated him in a separate pot for the moment until I can get a diagnosis. Any help would be appreciated.
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Thanks :)
 
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Firstly fusarium is a fungus not a bacteria nor virus, both of which primarily arrive in a plant via insect bites. Secondly, the fusarium virus is in the soil, and makes a breakthrough into the plant via roots, and usually moves up the plant showing in the stem first. Are you planting in super rich soil or pure manure compost or something super rich? It looks dark and heavy. Normally in pots one uses potting soil. There are multiple reasons. Aeration and drainage are two that impact fungal attack.
 
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Hi DirtMechanic,

The soil was just Osmocote “Herb and Veg” pre-prepared soil purchased from Bunnings. The basil was also purchased from Bunnings. When I purchased it, it had one spot on one of the leaves, so I cut that stem to hopefully stop it spreading, but it had continued and spread into all the other leaves as you could see in the photo. In the end, I returned the plant to Bunnings in hope of replacing it with another Basil plant, but they had run out of stock, so I replaced it with a Rosemary.
Would you recommend a different soil for the rosemary?
Thanks
 
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If i may respond, I can say the problem is you are growing your little plants in too big of containers. The result is, the soil stays too wet in the middle of the container and the roots can't get enough oxygen. Your soil Osmocote "herb and veg" is fine and a good soil, however too much soil in a large container will never dry properly giving the result you have now. If you start with smaller containers you can better manage your watering and nutrient intake much easier .
 
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These two cuttings were started at the same time with the same soil, water, the only difference is the size of the water volume. The large pot gets watered about every 14 days and the little one gets water every 4 days. The little container has maintained more rigorous root growth because of the excess exposure to oxygen. The big one, would have been easy to over-water because of the pot size, if I would have watered the same as the little one. Bigger pots doesn't help little plants grow bigger. Bigger pots help fungus and mold grow and restricts root growth. Start small and wait until the roots fills up the containers before transplanting.
 

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