A total change in my approach to a garden.

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Stuff that decomposes, as in a compost pile or as heavy/thick mulch, consumes N, so you need to add some. Not a lot, some, to bring it back to non-N-deficient. If you want more foliage growth, you add more for that, remembering that you want to give vegetables like tomatoes low rates and leafy things like lettuce more, etc. I agree that if your mulch is disappearing quickly you are benefiting quickly.

Yes, having lots and lots of worms is wonderful, and they do makes lots of aerating tunnels and leave lots of castings in little piles, but that's not a substitute for turning the soil which accelerates the process of putting all the ingredients in close association. The constituents of soil do not migrate by their own hand. If you pile two feet of manure on the top, rain will leach some good stuff into the mineral soil below the surface, but the fiberous material will remain in-place, on top until the wind blows it away over time. To get the best mix, you gotta mix! If you mulch heavily, it is arguably more beneficial to turn that decayed material into the soil, than it is to prevent weeds and retain soil moisture. The residue can blow away over time or feed them voracious microbes with worm castings and tiny little fibers (don't want them to get all bound up!), -your choice! If you calculate the amount of land which is fully tilled verses no-till, and ask yourself why the tiller's do all-l-l-l that work when they could just plow a single furrow, an answer will emerge: Production, with a capital P.:happy: The no-till farmers can only feed the rich people in Manhattan, the other guys are feeding the world.

What is woodash? Wood ash?
 
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alp

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Did you not absorb the fact that his soil is riddled with worms?
They aerate and lighten the soil to prevent panning, providing nutrients as they do.
I am sure Robert has absorbed the fact!

It depends how compact your soil is. It your clay can make brick, like mine, you will know that there is no way the soil is RIDDLED with worms. Perhaps you have never had the misfortune of working with clay! It's a different kind of beast altogether!
 
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@alp I have clay lime yours. Tnere really was a pottery in town some 100 years ago...go figure. So that is why my garden are raised beds. And I get great drainage.. :LOL:
 
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Just for arguments sake, let’s say my no till garden only produces 60% of what it would have being tilled and fertilized with commercial fertilizer. Also consider that I have to rake the leaves in my yard whether I compost them or take them to the landfill. I also have to clean out my horse and chicken barns whether I compost the manure or take it to the landfill. It is far less time consuming to dump it all in a pile next to the garden and let it decompose for a year, then spread it on the garden. If this type of gardening works and I only loose 40% of my harvest I will consider it a rousing success because of the time and labor savings.
 
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I'm happy :happy:now that I have a pick-up truck :happy:
Pick up trucks are great but when I resodded the front boulevards, I lined the bed of my Dodge Caravan and picked up the rolls in it. I could have taken the F150 but then you have to heave the rolls a lot higher to get them in the back.

The truck is great for tall things for sure in my case but because I'm a little vertically challenged for other items, it's the van.
 

alp

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Just for arguments sake, let’s say my no till garden only produces 60% of what it would have being tilled and fertilized with commercial fertilizer. Also consider that I have to rake the leaves in my yard whether I compost them or take them to the landfill. I also have to clean out my horse and chicken barns whether I compost the manure or take it to the landfill. It is far less time consuming to dump it all in a pile next to the garden and let it decompose for a year, then spread it on the garden. If this type of gardening works and I only loose 40% of my harvest I will consider it a rousing success because of the time and labor savings.
When you turn over the composted manure, you could be disturbing the microbes, bacteria and worms in the pile. The purists of no-till insist on no turning as turning the soil/heap will disturb the goodness in the soil. Having said that, clay soil really needs to be turned and loosened. Indeed, I had to pick up the clay clods and smashed them against a dwarf brick wall. AND they still came down as a whole lump! LOL!

I have your way forward is good enough and is the right way forward!
 
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Just for arguments sake, let’s say my no till garden only produces 60% of what it would have being tilled and fertilized with commercial fertilizer. Also consider that I have to rake the leaves in my yard whether I compost them or take them to the landfill. I also have to clean out my horse and chicken barns whether I compost the manure or take it to the landfill. It is far less time consuming to dump it all in a pile next to the garden and let it decompose for a year, then spread it on the garden. If this type of gardening works and I only loose 40% of my harvest I will consider it a rousing success because of the time and labor savings.
Always and evermore, your garden is yours to enjoy, and yours alone. Go forth and enjoy!
 
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