What's a good book to start trying to learn about permaculture?

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I started Permaculture a Designers Manual by Bill Mollison and I'm learning a lot from it. It's pretty heavy for me and extremely in depth, maybe in areas that aren't so important for me and my little property. I understand that it's the bible when it comes to Permaculture and it was a free pdf so I started there. But does anyone have any other recommendations?
 
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I highly recommend 'Permaculture Design Companion - A Practical Workbook' by Jasmine Dale.

It truly is a workbook - based upon courses she gives I believe. All the way through there's exercises for you to complete and pages to fill in. It sounds a bit childish, but it really is a great way to help you really get your head around the concepts and apply it to your own garden.
 
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Just a point - one of the reasons I like it so much is that it's written by a British woman so it's very applicable to the UK climate. That might make it a bit less suitable for you (I notice you're in US), but it really does apply to everyone. It differs from most American books only in that it doesn't assume you're in the US. But nor does it assume you're in the UK!
 
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I started Permaculture a Designers Manual by Bill Mollison and I'm learning a lot from it. It's pretty heavy for me and extremely in depth, maybe in areas that aren't so important for me and my little property. I understand that it's the bible when it comes to Permaculture and it was a free pdf so I started there. But does anyone have any other recommendations?
Most books on permaculture are meant as a guide - including that one - on how to think about designing garden systems.

Suggest to just get started with an area you can realistically manage, and decide what you want to do - a real achievable goal. Don't worry too much about all the potential connections between this and that, and let your observations guide you in your decision making over time.
 
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Most books on permaculture are meant as a guide - including that one - on how to think about designing garden systems.

Suggest to just get started with an area you can realistically manage, and decide what you want to do - a real achievable goal. Don't worry too much about all the potential connections between this and that, and let your observations guide you in your decision making over time.
I get that. As I read more I understand it's about a way of thinking. If I've got a flooded area of my yard, how can I use that instead of trying to change or overcome nature. It's a waste of energy. I'll plant something there that likes wet soil. They really should teach the concept to kids when they're in school. Like get people thinking this way from the start. It applies to all aspects of life.
 
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I get that. As I read more I understand it's about a way of thinking. If I've got a flooded area of my yard, how can I use that instead of trying to change or overcome nature. It's a waste of energy. I'll plant something there that likes wet soil. They really should teach the concept to kids when they're in school. Like get people thinking this way from the start. It applies to all aspects of life.
I had this thought about people describing "invasive plants". They prosper so well in your area it simply takes any load off of you....if you can use them that is, or cobble something where it makes sustainable crops happier and thus easier to support.
 
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I heard that they brought kudzu to Georgia in the 70's to help with land erosion but the Japanese never told us how fast it could grow and how some people thought they did it on purpose as a terrorist tactic.

I heard this 20 years ago from a trucker who picked me up when I was hitchhiking. So I was hoping someone would confirm or deny this.
 

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