What does your garden look like ... Today?


Colin

Retired.
Joined
Sep 17, 2017
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Location
Huddersfield.
Hardiness Zone
7
Country
United Kingdom
Hi,

We've had lots of rain and now lots of frost but in spite of this weather and me being stubborn I dragged the rotavator up the mountain and rotavated the small wildflower meadow I created last year. First job was to remove the spent flowers and at first I tried using my cordless hedge trimmer but found it quicker to simply use the rake although it was hard work; I then went over with the petrol mower and finally the rotavator; in a few weeks I'll rotavate and rake again then broadcast new wildflower seeds hoping for a similar glorious display of bloom as last year.

I just became so fed up of the dire climate holding me back; the rotavator kept blocking up with wet soil and debris but I didn't care; the wind was bitterly cold and working on the steeply sloping site made the job very hard indeed; raking too was difficult due to the sticky wet soil and again it was bitterly cold but I won in the end.

Kind regards, Colin

Wildflowers_0001.JPG


Spent wildflowers looking a mess.

Wildflowers_0002.JPG


Raking removed the bulk.

Wildflowers_0003.JPG


Looking a lot better after mowing.

Wildflowers_0004.JPG


Spent wildflowers.

Jan 16 2020_0001.JPG


Difficult and hard but not impossible.

Jan 16 2020_0002.JPG


Frequent stops to clear the tines using a stick; having started I wasn't going to quit even if it snowed; it sure was cold in the strong wind.

Jan 16 2020_0005.JPG


Balancing the rotavator in order to prevent it heading to the valley bottom; standing upright on this slope is a challenge without trying to do any work. It gives me a great workout.
 
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Meadowlark

Gardner, Angler, Adjunct Professor, and Rancher
Joined
Feb 5, 2019
Messages
632
Reaction score
508
Location
East Texas
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
Current inventory...and prospects for annual supply

Gonna be a busy 6 weeks or so coming up...enough great food to last a year easily.

1) sweet peas companion planted w/potatoes, yellow and red sweet onions (storm pushed some yellows over), limas, green beans, bingo beans, asparagus beans, etc.

peas,potatoes,onions, beans.JPG



2) first corn planting (two more plantings to go), various beans, melons, cucumbers, tomatillos, squash

corn, beans,tomatitillos,melons,squash,cucumbers.JPG



3) late kale, late chard, late brock, late cabbage, carrots, radishes, squash, 20 tomato plants, various peppers, and a few left over turnips

kale, broc, cabbage, chard, peppers, carrots, radishes,squash, tomatoes.JPG


4) years supply of pintos, crème peas, and recently planted okra.

pintos, peas and okra.JPG
 
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JBtheExplorer

Native Gardener
Joined
Jun 13, 2014
Messages
1,375
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2,907
Location
Wisconsin
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
Today, three plants began blooming for the first time this year!

Fern-leaf Bleeding Heart
IMG_6686 copy.jpg


Wild Geranium
IMG_6690 copy.jpg


Stout Blue-eyed Grass
IMG_6693 copy.jpg



My Eastern Red Columbine looks great, too!
IMG_6696 copy.jpg


IMG_6699 copy.jpg
 
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JBtheExplorer

Native Gardener
Joined
Jun 13, 2014
Messages
1,375
Reaction score
2,907
Location
Wisconsin
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
Here's my main native garden. The closest section with all the black-eyed susans is in its first season. I removed the lawn last year and scattered seed in winter. Looking good so far! Will be interesting to see how it changes next year.


IMG_2217 copy.jpg
 
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