What does your garden look like ... Today?


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Didn't do much today. Had to clean y golf clubs, trolley and car.
So just had a check on any progress.


Tidied up the Mayleen over the front door. It'll soon bush up and trail down.

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Pleased with how well the fifteen patio roses are doing. No sign of blackspot, but must remember to spray them every two weeks.

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The Wet and Forget I used on the patios and path has cleared all traces of "green"

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We've about four clumps of frogspawn in thee frog pond.

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The Stella cherry, new to us last year has a lot of flower buds on it.

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I've still got it "wired" to stop some branches crossing. I'll remove the wires in a couple of months when the growth will help them "set" in their new position.

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The iron sulphate I gave the lawn yesterday has already started to green it up.

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JBtheExplorer

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I can finally start contributing again!

Prairie Smoke is starting to show signs of growth.
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Right next to my Prairie Smoke is a soon-to-be rabbit nest. She's dug it out little by little each night, just as she did last year in the exact same spot.
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Colin

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Hi,

Our rear garden is looking like hard graft. I'm replacing the shed and preparing the site making a better job of it. This morning I felt cold first thing but I've just knocked off not knowing where to put myself whilst wet with sweat. I've been saving stone from previous jobs including stone from our old chimney stack; this has been stored under the decking to the bungalow front. It was tiring just retrieving the stone but then I barrowed it to the bungalow rear before physically carrying it up the garden. Sounds easy enough but we live on a very steep valley side making just walking up the garden difficult.

I potted lots of Cerastium seeds so hope these will germinate; the prevailing breeze dries the pots out quickly. I daren't build a greenhouse because of the high winds we suffer up the valley.

I must be getting soft because I feel tired out. :)

Kind regards, Colin.

Hard graft_001.JPG


I'd forgotten how heavy stone is.

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I'm in for fun because the stones are all shapes and sizes.

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Cerastium (Snow in summer) grows well here so I've potted lots of Cerastium seeds.
 
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Mowed the lawn and trimmed up the edges of the feature beds.
At this time of year I run a knife round the brick circles to get a even finish. This with running the strimmer alomg the edge of the path, produces narrow strips of grass with roots. I use these to patch small bare spots, a bit like hair transplants!



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A strimmer does produce a nice clean edge.

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Our first azalea is in bloom. It's in the front garden which is North facing and sees very little sun. It has lengths of plastic clothes line attached to it, to pull it away from the house a bit. I'll remove them in a couple of months, when it's "set."

P1020416.JPG



Our little acer which I pruned over the winter, is doing well. It'll get another prune once the leaves are out. It produces new foliage all through the summer.


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Mowed the lawn and trimmed up the edges of the feature beds.
At this time of year I run a knife round the brick circles to get a even finish. This with running the strimmer alomg the edge of the path, produces narrow strips of grass with roots. I use these to patch small bare spots, a bit like hair transplants!



View attachment 51225

View attachment 51226


A strimmer does produce a nice clean edge.

View attachment 51227


View attachment 51228

Our first azalea is in bloom. It's in the front garden which is North facing and sees very little sun. It has lengths of plastic clothes line attached to it, to pull it away from the house a bit. I'll remove them in a couple of months, when it's "set."

View attachment 51229


Our little acer which I pruned over the winter, is doing well. It'll get another prune once the leaves are out. It produces new foliage all through the summer.


View attachment 51230
Always so pleasant to see!
 

Colin

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Hi,

Your garden looks gorgeous Sean; perhaps Bron and I should emigrate to your side of The Pennines then we could enjoy a lawn such as yours; living here on the valley side our grass was more moss than grass whatever I did with it so it had to go and now its mostly flower beds. Thanks for posting the pictures; I've now got something to aspire to. :)

I'm still fighting just to put up a garden hut; today I've been cutting laurels down to make a bit of space in order to work; a couple of years ago these laurels were 30' tall so I attacked them bringing them down to 3' tall so I could talk to them; everything I do is hard graft but it's better than being bored.

Kind regards, Colin.

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Small branches removed using axe and now ready for the chainsaw.

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All these laurels were 30' tall and getting well out of control until I attacked them; they now make attractive ground cover.

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A petrol chainsaw is a must have machine here saving us a fortune.

Laurels_004.JPG


That's more like it; I can now start to build the retaining wall out of stone. The brash I'll dispose of but the logs will be collected tomorrow by a wood burning friend.
 

JBtheExplorer

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Wild Geranium is just starting to pop up. They should be blooming by the middle of May.

IMG_8767 copy.jpg
 
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My favorite gardening hat has the feather of a crow given a couple years ago.View attachment 51299

Nice hat!

I like 'em

I've had my "Frank Sinatra" Shantung silk hat for about fifteen years. It came mail order from Winner Caps, in New York.

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As did my "Frank Sinatra" leather hat, which matches my leather coat. Sadly, worn mostly at winter funerals.

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Under the all pervasive hot sun of a deathly still Alabama skyin late July I saw a older friend in his garden wearing a black hat like that as well as a pair of white rubber boots. To this day I am so glad he had on some speedos. Even so, it was a sight I cannot unsee. Its funny what the sun does to people here, with the incredibly unrelenting humidity and heat. The sun is funny that way. When I was in Alaska, it was almost the exact opposite.. as this poem by Robert Service describes:


The Cremation of Sam McGee
BY ROBERT W. SERVICE
There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales

That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,

But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge

I cremated Sam McGee.

Now Sam McGee was from Tennessee, where the cotton blooms and blows.
Why he left his home in the South to roam 'round the Pole, God only knows.
He was always cold, but the land of gold seemed to hold him like a spell;
Though he'd often say in his homely way that "he'd sooner live in hell."

On a Christmas Day we were mushing our way over the Dawson trail.
Talk of your cold! through the parka's fold it stabbed like a driven nail.
If our eyes we'd close, then the lashes froze till sometimes we couldn't see;
It wasn't much fun, but the only one to whimper was Sam McGee.

And that very night, as we lay packed tight in our robes beneath the snow,
And the dogs were fed, and the stars o'erhead were dancing heel and toe,
He turned to me, and "Cap," says he, "I'll cash in this trip, I guess;
And if I do, I'm asking that you won't refuse my last request."

Well, he seemed so low that I couldn't say no; then he says with a sort of moan:
"It's the cursèd cold, and it's got right hold till I'm chilled clean through to the bone.
Yet 'tain't being dead—it's my awful dread of the icy grave that pains;
So I want you to swear that, foul or fair, you'll cremate my last remains."

A pal's last need is a thing to heed, so I swore I would not fail;
And we started on at the streak of dawn; but God! he looked ghastly pale.
He crouched on the sleigh, and he raved all day of his home in Tennessee;
And before nightfall a corpse was all that was left of Sam McGee.

There wasn't a breath in that land of death, and I hurried, horror-driven,
With a corpse half hid that I couldn't get rid, because of a promise given;
It was lashed to the sleigh, and it seemed to say: "You may tax your brawn and brains,
But you promised true, and it's up to you to cremate those last remains."

Now a promise made is a debt unpaid, and the trail has its own stern code.
In the days to come, though my lips were dumb, in my heart how I cursed that load.
In the long, long night, by the lone firelight, while the huskies, round in a ring,
Howled out their woes to the homeless snows— O God! how I loathed the thing.

And every day that quiet clay seemed to heavy and heavier grow;
And on I went, though the dogs were spent and the grub was getting low;
The trail was bad, and I felt half mad, but I swore I would not give in;
And I'd often sing to the hateful thing, and it hearkened with a grin.

Till I came to the marge of Lake Lebarge, and a derelict there lay;
It was jammed in the ice, but I saw in a trice it was called the "Alice May."
And I looked at it, and I thought a bit, and I looked at my frozen chum;
Then "Here," said I, with a sudden cry, "is my cre-ma-tor-eum."

Some planks I tore from the cabin floor, and I lit the boiler fire;
Some coal I found that was lying around, and I heaped the fuel higher;
The flames just soared, and the furnace roared—such a blaze you seldom see;
And I burrowed a hole in the glowing coal, and I stuffed in Sam McGee.

Then I made a hike, for I didn't like to hear him sizzle so;
And the heavens scowled, and the huskies howled, and the wind began to blow.
It was icy cold, but the hot sweat rolled down my cheeks, and I don't know why;
And the greasy smoke in an inky cloak went streaking down the sky.

I do not know how long in the snow I wrestled with grisly fear;
But the stars came out and they danced about ere again I ventured near;
I was sick with dread, but I bravely said: "I'll just take a peep inside.
I guess he's cooked, and it's time I looked"; ... then the door I opened wide.

And there sat Sam, looking cool and calm, in the heart of the furnace roar;
And he wore a smile you could see a mile, and he said: "Please close that door.
It's fine in here, but I greatly fear you'll let in the cold and storm—
Since I left Plumtree, down in Tennessee, it's the first time I've been warm."

There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales

That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,

But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge

I cremated Sam McGee.
 

JBtheExplorer

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There has been a lot of growth in the native garden over the past week. It's exciting!
Eastern Red Columbine is coming up.
IMG_9089 copy.jpg


I bought Rue Anemone last year right as it was finishing blooming, so it'll be fun seeing it bloom this spring.
It was mistakenly labeled as False Rue Anemone, but I bought it anyway since I needed more woodland plants.
IMG_9092 copy.jpg
 
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Daybreak after almost 4 inches of rain last night. I suppose planting the garden yesterday made it rain?
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I certainly see one pathway pathogens from the forest litter use to get into the garden!
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@DirtMechanic , I have that ground cover you posted way above, the one with the green leaves and silverwhite accents on the leaves and yellow flowers. it will take over, I have ripped about 99% of it out of my hosta sections. but some of it tossed in the woods, where it can do its thing. its a shame its so vigorous, as I do like the looks, but only a bit here and there, not when it gets all crazy around other plants. forgot the name of it.
 
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Mowed the lawn and trimmed up the edges of the feature beds.
At this time of year I run a knife round the brick circles to get a even finish. This with running the strimmer alomg the edge of the path, produces narrow strips of grass with roots. I use these to patch small bare spots, a bit like hair transplants!



View attachment 51225

View attachment 51226


A strimmer does produce a nice clean edge.

View attachment 51227


View attachment 51228

Our first azalea is in bloom. It's in the front garden which is North facing and sees very little sun. It has lengths of plastic clothes line attached to it, to pull it away from the house a bit. I'll remove them in a couple of months, when it's "set."

View attachment 51229


Our little acer which I pruned over the winter, is doing well. It'll get another prune once the leaves are out. It produces new foliage all through the summer.


View attachment 51230
Oh what beautiful edges you have Sean Logan. I have no hope of getting mine to look like thatsadly.
I've tried a few tactics to define my garden beds, planted lamium all the way round one large area....it looked good for a while but dies off in summer, tried ajuga, white plecanthra, spacing liriope, rocks, digging a shallow edge. It's all a work in progress I guess!
 

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