What does your garden look like ... Today?


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I wasn't going to do much today other than mix up a bit of soil and grass seed and apply it on a couple of small patches on the edge of the lawn.
As it was sunny, I thought I'd give the tea-house a bit of a wash down. But before I started I checked the bottoms of the "skirts" around the base of the building for any sign of rot. Unfortunately I found a bit where it was just starting to go. So I cut a 1/2" bit off part of the bottom with my jigsaw. As the bottom of the skirt is about three inches above the path it wan't difficult. Then I treated it with some Cuprinol and glued a new bit of wood in the gap I'd cut out.
It's jammed up hard against the skirt and wedged with "stuff" to keep it in place for a couple of days. I've also spread some wood filler over the join which would otherwise be noticeable, to be rubbed down on Tuesday. I also sanded the rest of the skirt, ready for a coat or two of Dulux Mahogany Woodsheen, when the repair is complete.

50199


I checked the other skirts, but they were fine. It's this one that is the "weather side" that was affected. But I gave the undersides of the others a coat of Cuprinol, as a precautionary measure.

Despite it being built of softwood in 1987, it's still wearing well.

I'm always concerned about these plywood panels I made freehand with a jigsaw, as plywood out in the weather can start to delaminate, but these are fine.
The whole frame of the building is only screwed together, though the side panels are glued and screwed. There's 1" dowl plugs inserted over the recessed screws to give the appearance of wooden "pinjoints." Being only screwed together, allows for a bit of flexibilty, when there's changes in temperature. Although it's still "rock solid."

50200


The windows which are also on the weather side, are still perfect. They are just one sheet of opaque plastic (recycled suspended ceiling panels) with applied bits of hardwood. I risked cutting those to a more rectangular size with my jigsaw, the stuff's quite brittle and could have shattered. The "frames" are recycled hardwood slats from one of those self assembly garden benches which were popular at the time. There's a gutter and downpipe on the back of the roof to stop rainwater running off onto the back fence.


50202


I'm even more impressed with the doors made of "2 X 1" softwood. They are still in perfect condition. I got a woodyard to cut all the pieces to size. Sawing a groove down the inside of some bits and down both of others to take the plastic panels. Then all I had to do was make them up like a DIY kit. Fortunately three of the opaque plastic windows in a row in their frames, were near as dammit the correct width to fit the building without me having to cut them. More applied strips of hardwood to form the individual panes. I made small plywood panels for the bottom of each door. Windows that size would have looked silly.

50201



I made this opaque plastic window for the side of the verandah, just to stop cats that get into the garden, using the rail on that side to jump up onto and over the fence. I knew it wouldn't stop them completely, but I wasn't going to make it easy for them.

50203


The right-hand side of building is quite boring. No point putting matching windows in there as no one would see them and being so close to the fence wouldn't let much light in.

50204


The back of the building is even more boring.



[/QUOTE]
 
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I wasn't going to do much today other than mix up a bit of soil and grass seed and apply it on a couple of small patches on the edge of the lawn.
As it was sunny, I thought I'd give the tea-house a bit of a wash down. But before I started I checked the bottoms of the "skirts" around the base of the building for any sign of rot. Unfortunately I found a bit where it was just starting to go. So I cut a 1/2" bit off part of the bottom with my jigsaw. As the bottom of the skirt is about three inches above the path it wan't difficult. Then I treated it with some Cuprinol and glued a new bit of wood in the gap I'd cut out.
It's jammed up hard against the skirt and wedged with "stuff" to keep it in place for a couple of days. I've also spread some wood filler over the join which would otherwise be noticeable, to be rubbed down on Tuesday. I also sanded the rest of the skirt, ready for a coat or two of Dulux Mahogany Woodsheen, when the repair is complete.

View attachment 50199

I checked the other skirts, but they were fine. It's this one that is the "weather side" that was affected. But I gave the undersides of the others a coat of Cuprinol, as a precautionary measure.

Despite it being built of softwood in 1987, it's still wearing well.

I'm always concerned about these plywood panels I made freehand with a jigsaw, as plywood out in the weather can start to delaminate, but these are fine.
The whole frame of the building is only screwed together, though the side panels are glued and screwed. There's 1" dowl plugs inserted over the recessed screws to give the appearance of wooden "pinjoints." Being only screwed together, allows for a bit of flexibilty, when there's changes in temperature. Although it's still "rock solid."

View attachment 50200

The windows which are also on the weather side, are still perfect. They are just one sheet of opaque plastic (recycled suspended ceiling panels) with applied bits of hardwood. I risked cutting those to a more rectangular size with my jigsaw, the stuff's quite brittle and could have shattered. The "frames" are recycled hardwood slats from one of those self assembly garden benches which were popular at the time. There's a gutter and downpipe on the back of the roof to stop rainwater running off onto the back fence.


View attachment 50202

I'm even more impressed with the doors made of "2 X 1" softwood. They are still in perfect condition. I got a woodyard to cut all the pieces to size. Sawing a groove down the inside of some bits and down both of others to take the plastic panels. Then all I had to do was make them up like a DIY kit. Fortunately three of the opaque plastic windows in a row in their frames, were near as dammit the correct width to fit the building without me having to cut them. More applied strips of hardwood to form the individual panes. I made small plywood panels for the bottom of each door. Windows that size would have looked silly.

View attachment 50201


I made this opaque plastic window for the side of the verandah, just to stop cats that get into the garden, using the rail on that side to jump up onto and over the fence. I knew it wouldn't stop them completely, but I wasn't going to make it easy for them.

View attachment 50203

The right-hand side of building is quite boring. No point putting matching windows in there as no one would see them and being so close to the fence wouldn't let much light in.

View attachment 50204

The back of the building is even more boring.
[/QUOTE]

That is amazing structure! Becky announced that She would be in charge of the garden this year so that I would have time to perform a variety of trim and other construction details without distraction! She is obviously concerned with me becoming overtaxed! I will see about some before and after pictures as I go along, but they will never approach the artistic beauty of what you have shown us in those few pictures!
 
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Its a Paraclipse popular a few years ago over your way.
Sat channels I assume? I tried satellite, but our high wind comes in such a manner that at the same time the tornado arrives, the sat signal goes away because of water in the clouds. It only lasted one tornado season.
 

JBtheExplorer

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After two months in the fridge, I pulled out my native plant seeds a few days ago. After a few short days, many are already growing! Always fun seeing them progress from tiny seedlings to blooming plants. A few species will bloom as early as this summer, but most will take another year. It's a great feeling knowing they'll all be used to help local wildlife.

50563
 
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I did a bit today.

Just the one job, potted out the nine new polianthes tuberosa bulbs in three plastic pots.
I like to use these saucers, upturned until it gets into the summer, then right way up to retain a bit of water.

50721


With the pot movers, I drill a hole in the cente to let water out in the winter. Then cover it with a dab of silicone for the summer, to retain some water. It gets very hot on our patio as it's south facing and the York stone absorbs and reflects a lot of heat.
 

JBtheExplorer

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No garden photos yet, but the snow is melting fast. Won't be long now before some of the early growers start popping up.

I have plenty of greenery indoors. Quite a few native seedlings are growing.
IMG_8571 copy.jpg




Today, I picked up dill seeds. I'll be growing them entirely in hopes of attracting Black Swallowtail butterflies.
IMG_8570 copy.jpg
 
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Dried out enough so I can do some more leaf raking. At least 2 hours of it would be good.

been looking at seeds for my ordering selection, toying with the list etc. I always order more than I should. And have tons of Moon Flower seeds from last years vines to deal with also.
 
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I did a bit today. Mowed the lawn.

"First cut is the shortest."

Not looking too bad, I'll give it some iron sulphate at the week-end.

P1020389.JPG



The quince is doing well. Despite being heavily pruned each year to protect the rhodos and azaleas.

P1020390.JPG



Gave the paths and patios a dose of "Wet n' Forget." I use a 5lt pump sprayer, gives more control and wastes less.


Gave the fifteen roses in pots on the patio a feed.

P1020392.JPG


P1020393.JPG


And the five that are a bit out of favour in pots next to the fence at the side of the drive.

P1020383.JPG
 
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This rose has a history.

It was originally in a pot on the patio.
This was it ten years ago.

P1020355.JPG



But my wife didn't like it. She associates red roses with funerals. So it "had to go."

Well it didn't, I planted it between some rhododendrons half way down the garden.
It thanked me by thriving. So much so, I recycled an old bird feeder to support it.

P1030706.JPG



It just couldn't keep its head down.

P1060024.JPG



It got spotted from the French windows. Even without the zoom.


P1050346.JPG



So it had to go again. I chopped it down to about a foot and it ended up amongst these other five unloved roses in tubs to the side of the drive. They don't get a lot of sun here.

P1060451.JPG



Anyway, "a vacancy" has occured again down at the bottom of the garden. So it's out of the tub. But I've told it to keep its head down.

P1020384.JPG
 
Last edited:

Colin

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Hi,

Two year ago our rear garden was mostly meadow grass and moss full of pot holes dug by squirrels. I turned over most of the grass by spade leaving it over winter and since then I went over five times with a new rotavator Bron generously bought me for Christmas; at the very top of the garden was a big hedge and lots of assorted bushes being overgrown by mile a minute vine; the garden and our whole site is very steep it being a valley side; using the rotavator was challenging to say the least the ground being full of roots and stones but I stuck with it; one of the tines on the rotavator kept being displaced so in the end I removed both lots of tines and did a bit of welding; there's a clutch which slips if the tines jam up so welding was OK.

Last year because I planted many flowers and shrubs we enjoyed a very rare long summer plunging the garden into a drought; I tried watering cans and the hose but the water simply ran away heading to the valley bottom creating little streams; we've not enjoyed a summer for many years so because I planted it was expect to be a drought; we even paid £600 for cross season tyres for our car but with our luck we've only had icing sugar as snow so far this year. GRRRRR.

I thought lots of the plants had died off but I'm amazed to see the garden transformation; it's in full colour now; two rows of primula were planted at the top of the garden and I had little hope these would survive but most have and are now very pretty indeed; the bare ground next to the primulas is going to be turned into meadow flowers I've recently scattered thousands of meadow flower seeds so I hope these thrive as the year progresses; I've just been up the garden taking pictures and the breeze is still perishing. Not the best looking garden on this forum but a huge improvement over what it used to be.

Kind regards, Colin.

Garden March 19_006.JPG


Looking up the mountain.

Garden March 19_007.JPG


This time of the year is truly wonderful.

Garden March 19_008.JPG


What a delight.

Garden March 19_009.JPG


It only takes a day without rain for the soil to dry out. Lots of crocus were pretty whilst in flower.

Garden March 19_010.JPG


Adding a bit of colour under laurels.

Garden March 19_011.JPG


It's difficult standing upright; I can't put a mug of tea on the ground without it heading down to the valley bottom. Rotavating was fun.

Garden March 19_012.JPG


I thought these had died off last year. Meadow flower seeds have been scattered on the prepared ground I hope they grow to attract butterflies and bees etc.

Garden March 19_013.JPG


Close up. Looks like the grass is also coming back to life.
 

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