What did you do in your garden today?


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I finished sifting through half a ton of soil removing rocks, stones and roots. I'll use the soil for filling dips in my lawns and then grass seed them.

@Colin you've done well working in a tricky situation, the wall looks good. (y) Perhaps your next venture should be a cable car. :)
 
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@Sheal what method or sieve did you use? I have two piles, one of sand and one of 3/4 (2cm) stone I need to clean of a bunch of plant debris.

@Colin its a joy to watch you go brother! No doubt there is a drawing on your desk? Or are you living a more risky lifestyle with so many successful projects under your belt?
 

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Hi,

Thanks Sheal; a cable car would make a nice project; Bron and I have often said we could benefit from a ski lift up the garden. :)

Thanks DirtMechanic; no drawing for this project I'm making it up as I go along as you say taking the risky lifestyle but I've done so much of this work over the years it comes naturally to me; the new hut will most likely be a clone of the hut I built a couple of years ago nearer the bungalow. ;)

By 8:30 this morning I'd visited Morrison's; the surgery; Aldi and Home Bargains now I'm having a mug of tea and bickie (cookie) I ache and my hips are sore but then I suffer for working in our gardens.

Kind regards, Colin.

New hut._002.JPG


A 30' tall mature holly tree was here and what a nightmare of a job in removing the stump/roots; I had to remove part of the garden wall to gain access.

New hut._001.JPG


It was hard graft getting the stump out but I stuck with it.

Holly root._001.JPG


Just one of the holly tree roots destroying the garden wall.

New hut._003.JPG


The garden wall being rebuilt; looking a mess at the moment so it can only get better.

New hut._004.JPG


After many hours hard work with nothing but problems the hut base is completed and new fence panel in place; the paving flags are the very heavy 3' x 2' and laid with a gradient to allow water run off.

New hut_001..JPG


The new hut in all its glory; this is fully home made and very robust constructed from 150mm x 22mm treated boards all fully screwed. I find hut building easy but the groundworks to be a nightmare due to the steep garden. For the last 32 years I've been upgrading our bungalow and gardens and have yet to find one easy job; I'm pleased the second hut site is now completed and I'll be ordering the timber shortly so yet more work ahead; I'm not complaining because I like to keep busy but these days I struggle more; if our site was level it would be much easier to do these jobs. I always take lots of digital images for future reference; I use my cheap Kodak PIXPRO FZ53 for general use such as the pictures I post here on the forum.
 
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Hi,

Thanks Sheal; a cable car would make a nice project; Bron and I have often said we could benefit from a ski lift up the garden. :)

Thanks DirtMechanic; no drawing for this project I'm making it up as I go along as you say taking the risky lifestyle but I've done so much of this work over the years it comes naturally to me; the new hut will most likely be a clone of the hut I built a couple of years ago nearer the bungalow. ;)

By 8:30 this morning I'd visited Morrison's; the surgery; Aldi and Home Bargains now I'm having a mug of tea and bickie (cookie) I ache and my hips are sore but then I suffer for working in our gardens.

Kind regards, Colin.

View attachment 51428

A 30' tall mature holly tree was here and what a nightmare of a job in removing the stump/roots; I had to remove part of the garden wall to gain access.

View attachment 51427

It was hard graft getting the stump out but I stuck with it.

View attachment 51431

Just one of the holly tree roots destroying the garden wall.

View attachment 51429

The garden wall being rebuilt; looking a mess at the moment so it can only get better.

View attachment 51430

After many hours hard work with nothing but problems the hut base is completed and new fence panel in place; the paving flags are the very heavy 3' x 2' and laid with a gradient to allow water run off.

View attachment 51426

The new hut in all its glory; this is fully home made and very robust constructed from 150mm x 22mm treated boards all fully screwed. I find hut building easy but the groundworks to be a nightmare due to the steep garden. For the last 32 years I've been upgrading our bungalow and gardens and have yet to find one easy job; I'm pleased the second hut site is now completed and I'll be ordering the timber shortly so yet more work ahead; I'm not complaining because I like to keep busy but these days I struggle more; if our site was level it would be much easier to do these jobs. I always take lots of digital images for future reference; I use my cheap Kodak PIXPRO FZ53 for general use such as the pictures I post here on the forum.
I like the way you joined the fascia rakes at the top with the diamond trim. Is that a metal roof? How it the ridge protected from the elements behind the trim?
 

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Hi,

Thanks DirtMechanic; yes the diamond trim is the icing on the cake and both were cut from offcuts hiding the mitred joint. The roof is constructed of 150mm x 22mm boards butted together and securely screwed; heavy polythene sheet was stapled to provide a base layer for the felt; the ridge was lined over the polythene with standard 100mm wide damp proof course; the polythene and DPC were allowed to overlap at the roof edges and stapled into position then the top layer of decent quality felt was applied this though being nailed using lots of galvanized clout nails so the entire roof is fully sealed; the fascia boards are simply trim being cut to size and screwed into position; this is a very strong hut.

I did this work midsummer which really should have been called an extension of our usually dire winters; when it wasn't pouring with rain and blowing a gale it was hail stoning; the timber was the heaviest timber I've ever had the displeasure of lifting it being so wet it could have been stored in a pond; as the screws were driven home water was oozing out; I was constantly uncomfortable and fed up of the climate but I wasn't going to let this stop me. the felt etc went on flat but as the timber dried out it caused the felt to pucker a bit; no real harm done but the climate wanted the last word; it was grim.

Kind regards, Colin.

Garden hut._001.JPG


Under construction; everything including me wet.
Garden hut._002.JPG


Roof on awaiting felting.

Garden hut._004.JPG


When I say I was working in dire weather I wasn't joking; mid summer it was a black hole with rain; wind and hail blasting me; the timber couldn't have been more wet had it been at the bottom of a pond for years; What a thoroughly unpleasant job this was.

Garden hut._005.JPG


This is what I had to cope with as I added the profile to the boards; my big 3hp router constantly choking on soaking wet timber; I must be mad doing this kind of work but living here in Yorkshire it's a case of get on with it because the bad weather isn't going to help.

Garden hut._006.JPG


Padlocks here have a short life if left to the weather so I designed and made a padlock cover in keeping with the new hut; I'm actually pleased with this and it works very well indeed whilst being simple. Please note the cup head set screw in the middle of the hasp; this cannot be unscrewed from the outside and secured inside with washer and nut.

Garden hut._007.JPG


The padlock cover open it being hinged; it was cut out on the bandsaw then glued together the hinge is a solid brass butt. So far with this new hut I've enjoyed fine but at times very cold weather at least I've not been soaking wet. When I order the new timber and it arrives this time I'll use my big 4hp home made saw bench to add the board profile rather than struggle using the router again. Strangely one of the hardest things to resolve was how to hold the padlock cover closed; in the end I dreamt up the stout galvanized wire which works perfectly and cost nothing to make.
 
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what method or sieve did you use? I have two piles, one of sand and one of 3/4 (2cm) stone I need to clean of a bunch of plant debris.
I used the word sifting loosely @DirtMechanic. :) I went through the soil with gloved hands bit by bit. It took days but I can't handle the weight of a sieve/riddle when it's full. By the time I'd finished I had a pile of debris almost the same size as the soil. This is the type of thing I would like to use, they are available with the mesh in different sizes. It would be fairly simple to make one of your own as it doesn't have to be round.

51459
 
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I used the word sifting loosely @DirtMechanic. :) I went through the soil with gloved hands bit by bit. It took days but I can't handle the weight of a sieve/riddle when it's full. By the time I'd finished I had a pile of debris almost the same size as the soil. This is the type of thing I would like to use, they are available with the mesh in different sizes. It would be fairly simple to make one of your own as it doesn't have to be round.

View attachment 51459
They sell those as a 55 gallon drum sieve. I was checking them out for a way to size char and filter my as yet untapped compost piles.
 
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I was just thinking, if you own a cement mixer perhaps it could be adapted to use as a sieve.
I do own a cement mixer. I thought about using it as a tumble breaker for home made charcoal. I do not have the right kind of chipper. I have run over it between pieces of plywood. I have smashed it with a hammer. Nothing save starting with chipped wood is worth the effort.

The compost is the easiest, except that one pile I have with sticks. I see Becky disregarded my pile discipline this fall. Normally I pile by type, leaves from fall in one, firewood sawdust and debris in another, Stems go in a pile to get chipped, Kitchen scraps in a bin. She put magnolia leaves and some vegetation in the leaf pile. :mad:

I will sort it when I dig out the first batch and consolidate them for the summer compost piles. More things I need to do in the garden!
 
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This might work for the charcoal DM. :D

View attachment 51475
I have a buddy that works with that kind of equipment. I don't think he would stop laughing at me long enough to get much done though.:unsure:

It turned into fertilizer day today, 200lbs\91Kg. My work is done until September in that regard. I waited thinking it would be cooler longer, and since it was 35 this morning I guess that was on track. But it will hit 83f\28c this weekend with night temps above 50f so here we go....
 
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Hi,

Thanks for adding the sieve/riddle picture Sheal; it brought back memories of over 50 years ago when just about every home had one of these but made of wood. They seemed to last forever. :)

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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Only did a bit today. Spent some time in the garage, cleaning up the UV, air pump and filter pump from the koi pool, ready to sell on.

I temporarily, moved half the roses off the big patio down to the small one, in readiness for the "pool fillers" who are now starting on Thursday rather than Monday. Fortunately, I've a sack truck I bought years ago for moving my 3cwt vinyl jukeboxes, "if necessary," so it wasn't too hard.

P1020455.JPG



Never seen so much space on this patio.

P1020456.JPG



We've yet to decide which roses will go on the new "paved pool," when it's finished.


This is the bed formed by two rows of rocks at the front of the pool

P1020458.JPG



These four will be going to make an access to the new paving. In the meantime, I've a ramp that will go here so they can barrow the rubble and hardcore into the pool.

P1020457.JPG


I was a bit concerned about the white wisteria we bought last year, as it's "doin' nufink,"

P1020452.JPG


Whereas the "old stagers" are this far along.

P1020453.JPG


P1020454.JPG



P1020459.JPG


But then I "checked my records" (credit card statements) and saw that we didn't buy it until 16th April last year and it wasn't doing anything then, looking no different than today, but the garden centre said they'd refund our fifty quid if it didn't thrive.


It got this far by the end of May, so I'm still hopeful.


15.JPG
 
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I have a buddy that works with that kind of equipment. I don't think he would stop laughing at me long enough to get much done though.
Haha! I bet if you offered him cash he'd take it more seriously.

Thanks for adding the sieve/riddle picture Sheal; it brought back memories of over 50 years ago when just about every home had one of these but made of wood.
You're right there Colin. I can remember my grandfather making use of one of those around his vegetable plot. Most of them are made of plastic now but they're still a useful item.
 
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Get two cross a few items of my list in the lazy thread! Dropped a sock looking lemon into the ground as well as a tangerine that's been struggling along in a pot. Got them both in ground, hopefully they recover, time will tell.

Also got some metallizer spread around and sprayed a bit of kelp on a few plants. Hopefully that will help the Kevin and tangerine as well!
 
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Yay, I got my old apple tree pruned, hopefully not too hard of a pruning, guess I'll find out. It was quite overgrown.
 
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Well, three of the 24 onion plants I planted are poking through (after three to four weeks) and only ONE bean plant of the 24 seeds I planted is coming up. I am very discouraged. I should go back to growing dandelions and spotted spurge. At least I can grow weeds successfully. UGH. :(:(:(
 
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