Rose bushes are too tall...


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I have rose bushes growing where I just moved and they are about 6 or 7 feet tall. I would like to cut them back so they are shorter. I am wondering when and how to do this without ruining them. I don't know what variety they are. Any advice? Thanks!:)
 
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I have rose bushes growing where I just moved and they are about 6 or 7 feet tall. I would like to cut them back so they are shorter. I am wondering when and how to do this without ruining them. I don't know what variety they are. Any advice? Thanks!:)
Where are you located?
 
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I have rose bushes growing where I just moved and they are about 6 or 7 feet tall. I would like to cut them back so they are shorter. I am wondering when and how to do this without ruining them. I don't know what variety they are. Any advice? Thanks!:)
You will lose some flowers but I'd say if you cut them now you'll have even more blooms this fall. I'd cut them back to about 4 feet then cut another foot in early winter if you need them even shorter. I'm assuming they aren't climbing roses, but if you think they're too tall, go for it. Can you post a picture before you do anything though.
 
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Here is a picture of one of them.... Thx so much! I have not done much gardening previously so any help is definitely appreciated.
When is your average first freeze or heavy frost? If you prune them now you probably have enough time for the new growth to harden off before it freezes. New growth that is frozen can damage the plant. If unsure be safe and wait until Feb or March and you can give them a good haircut
 
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Here is a picture of one of them.... Thx so much! I have not done much gardening previously so any help is definitely appreciated.
Definitely a nice climbing rose! I'd cut off the dead flowers especially the ones way up high. Cut the branches they are on about a foot with them. I would do the same with every branch after it's flower dies. If you find any branch particularly in your way, cut it back a foot too. Once you get them under control you will love those climbing roses. Good luck and love it by your mail box too.
 
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The first freeze shouldn't be until November or so. I will start by cutting the dead flowers off and maybe some other branches a foot or so like mentioned above. I really like it by the mailbox also! It had some huge roses on it, about as big as my hand so I definitely want to get it under control and looking nice. Again....thank you!
 
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The first freeze shouldn't be until November or so. I will start by cutting the dead flowers off and maybe some other branches a foot or so like mentioned above. I really like it by the mailbox also! It had some huge roses on it, about as big as my hand so I definitely want to get it under control and looking nice. Again....thank you!
Your porch and your house looks nice too! And yes those roses are wonderful. I recently got a clipping of a beautiful white climber and I know this isn't a good time of year to take clippings but I'm giving it a try. New leaves are sprouting so I'm keeping my fingers crossed.
 
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Thank you. I also have one that is about the same height in another part of the yard and I feel like you can't even enjoy the flowers because they are up so high. I would like to cut it way down to about half the height. I don't know how much is too much to cut off....
 
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Thank you. I also have one that is about the same height in another part of the yard and I feel like you can't even enjoy the flowers because they are up so high. I would like to cut it way down to about half the height. I don't know how much is too much to cut off....
I don't have much experience with climbing roses, I only have miniature roses now and I've grown hybrid teas and old garden roses before, so I know somewhat about their nature. The climbers naturally produce the longer branches, but the can be trained on a fence, trellis or even a wall. Trying to keep it the height you want (3-4 feet?) probably won't give you the Bush you're wanting it to be, a smaller bush. You can choose to buy those kinds of roses with many varieties to choose from. If I were you, I'd trim the climbers you have like I said before, even down to about 4 feet in early winter, then come next spring they'll full out more and of course get taller and you can see how they look training them and see how you like them when they reach about 6 feet again. They'll probably look better then at 6 feet than they look now. Climbing roses properly trained and cared for are a wonderful addition to any garden... beautiful I bet all along your brick wall. If you want some bush roses, late winter is the time to add some of those in your garden.
 
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Hi kelly from looking at the picture of your rose - I would say that your rose is a climber rather than a floribunda or hybrid tea - which as it is a climber will need a slightly different approach to pruning compared to that of other rose varieties.

Although there are several types of climbing roses the majority these days are what are known as modern climbers which generally grow to around 10 - 12 ft - but saying that there are some varieties that can grow way bigger than that.

As for pruning your climbing rose - I wouldn't do anything too drastic as you could spoil the look of your rose - particularly as most modern climbing roses don't generally need to be pruned much at all - and even then only light pruning is needed mainly for height, shape and to keep them looking tidy - which is done yearly in late winter to early spring - by removing all the dead wood, suckers and cross over stems - however this is only done once the rose is established - as climbers are best not pruned or at least as little as possible during their first 2 - 3 years of growth - as cutting back the main stems too early - will totally alter the look of the rose - as it will start to grow into a rather ugly unsightly shape.

So as your rose is currently around 6 - 7 feet tall - I would hazard a guess that it is still not fully established - which means that if you cut the main stems too drastically now - you could totally spoil the look of your rose - which would be a great shame particularly as its currently looking very healthy and attractive as it is - which is why I think rather than trying to reduce the size of your rose - it would be much better to leave it be and train it or fan it out where it is that you want it to grow on the wall.
 

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You have received a lot of good advice. You can cut it down to about half the size it is now or wait until fall and cut it down. I am in the same area you are in and know the warm weather is just really getting here so it is not to late to trim the plant back some for this summer.
 
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You have received a lot of good advice. You can cut it down to about half the size it is now or wait until fall and cut it down. I am in the same area you are in and know the warm weather is just really getting here so it is not to late to trim the plant back some for this summer.
Yea a lot of good advice here. Now I'm really hoping my cutting makes it. Where to plant it will be my next dilema. Haha
 
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You have received a lot of good advice. You can cut it down to about half the size it is now or wait until fall and cut it down. I am in the same area you are in and know the warm weather is just really getting here so it is not to late to trim the plant back some for this summer.

As the rose is a climber and therefore needs pruning differently from other rose varieties - am not sure that doing that would be a such good idea.
 
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Gata Montes is correct. Why not train your rose on some kind trellis and let it grow like it does naturally? Your house being brick it would be easy to do and in a year or two will be spectacular
 
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Thanks everyone! I trimmed it today.... Basically just cut off a few branches that were kind of in the way of the porch, then cut off all the dead flowers. It looks nicer than it did. I'll just leave it for now and maybe cut a foot or so off later. Would it be best to do that in the early spring?
 
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This is the other bush I mentioned. I'm not sure what to do with it. It is sort of "falling" over to the left. It had been tied together. Would tying it together tighter at the bottom help it out any?
 

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This is the other bush I mentioned. I'm not sure what to do with it. It is sort of "falling" over to the left. It had been tied together. Would tying it together tighter at the bottom help it out any?
I can't really tell what it is. Can you get a closeup of the leaves and stems. It looks like some type of bush
 
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