Invasive bamboo-like grass?

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I have found that a foreign broad leaf has been slowly spreading over areas of my lawn. Attached are photos which (hopefully) show this tough plant. Its roots create upward shoots, and a landscaper I showed this to said it resembles bamboo. He was not sure what it was, but said he did not think it was not native to my area of Pennsylvania. A previous owner of my property used the open space as a nursery, so I am thinking he had some pots of this growing that he dumped out on the property, and now after some 15 years they have spread from a central point to other areas via lawn cutting and growth.

When walking barefoot on the grass you feel the tough "spikes" once you walk on it. It also grows through cracks in a concrete shed floor I have, and left untouched will grow 2 to 3 feet in length. I wouldn't mind it on my lawn so much since it is green during the summer, but from October through March it turns brown and its invasive pattern becomes more visible each year.

I have the lawn fertilized moderately and have a full healthy lawn otherwise. Wondering if this plant can be identified and if I can selectively eliminate it without going "round-up".
 

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Definately Bamboo, you'll be up for some hard work to dig it out, if you can, but as it spreads by root it will be difficult. Is it possible to burn it with a flame gun? Otherwise chemical is your only means.
 
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A really difficult problem to eradicate. Bamboo, something I strongly urge people NOT to grow, is potentially impossible to control Craiger
In the lawn chemicals are limited to lawn weedkillers so I would try these first. Regular mowing will only serve to increase the "suckering". Chemicals like glyphosate will kill off the pieces treated but bamboo will be constantly spreading underground. Digging is also problematic........not sure it will eradicate bamboo if it has spread as it seems to have.
(I have expressed my view about bamboo elsewhere but so many will deny it is a problem. There are clump formers like fargesia but others should be avoided)
So, lawn weedkillers in the lawn,,glyphosate elsewhere and cultivation .....trace the long roots and pull/lift them. :)
 
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Greetings, welcome to the Forums.
What an interesting bamboo. I wish I knew which one it was.
The relatively narrow leaves remind me particularly of Pseudosasa owatarii, from Yakushima, but that is not a firm identification.
There are several dwarf bamboo in the genera Pleioblastus, Sasa, and Sasella that should also be considered, though many of them usually have wider leaves.
All the genera mentioned are native to China, Korea, Sakhalin, and especially, Japan, which has a number of species of low-growing bamboo that are widespread in cultivation.

Note: this is one of two nearly identical threads.
 
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Greetings, welcome to the Forums.
What an interesting bamboo. I wish I knew which one it was.
The relatively narrow leaves remind me particularly of Pseudosasa owatarii, from Yakushima, but that is not a firm identification.
There are several dwarf bamboo in the genera Pleioblastus, Sasa, and Sasella that should also be considered, though many of them usually have wider leaves.
All the genera mentioned are native to China, Korea, Sakhalin, and especially, Japan, which has a number of species of low-growing bamboo that are widespread in cultivation.

Note: this is one of two nearly identical threads.
Thanks Marck. This post is almost 5 years old, and I still appreciate replies to help identify this. The closest identification I came up with is the Sasa variety, though I am not at all certain. The "grass" still remains in my back lawn and is not really an eye-sore, but it has spread somewhat and is now becoming prominent on border of my 1.2 acres.

Thanks also for pointing out the identical thread- I only recall posting this question once.
 
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Yes, I'm not certain of the identification either, but it does look like an attractive plant, as long as its not too invasive.

Multiple threads happen all the time on the forms. I just note identical threads to lessen my own confusion.
 

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