Hot peppers that aren't

Discussion in 'Vegetables' started by vette-kid, Oct 23, 2018.

  1. vette-kid

    vette-kid

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    I've had a problem with my jalapenos. They produce like crazy, but controlling the water has proven a challenge that mother nature has no interest in. I have had a few good hot ones from the plant, but most are bell pepper heatless. Makes me sad. Will a hotter variety maintain more heat when given too much water? Or will a ghost pepper turn into just an ugly bell pepper? I'd really love some spicy peppers but the late summer rains have just killed all the heat.
     
    vette-kid, Oct 23, 2018
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  2. vette-kid

    johnny canoe

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    Several years ago I grew a few thai pepper plants, heavy producers and hot,hot,hot.
     
    johnny canoe, Oct 23, 2018
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  3. vette-kid

    alp

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    I have to grow my peppers indoors and there are small and late fruiting. Will upload a photo later! Now, I have my rice with chilli oil every evening! Addicted to the heat, especially with a bit of salt!
     
    alp, Oct 23, 2018
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  4. vette-kid

    Silentrunning

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    I believe peppers will cross pollinate. I have had Jalapeño peppers planted next to sweet banana peppers and they had no heat. I had them next to ornamental red peppers and they were inedibly hot. I’m not sure if this was coincidence or they truly cross pollinate and take on different characteristics.
     
    Silentrunning, Oct 23, 2018
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  5. vette-kid

    vette-kid

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    My understanding is, though they CAN cross pollinate, it will not affect the current plants fruit production (hot vs sweet). The generic namema for the fruit is already contained in the plant. But the resulting seed may produce a hybrid of sorts. So if you have multiple pepper varieties it might be best not to sure your seeds.
     
    vette-kid, Oct 23, 2018
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  6. vette-kid

    vette-kid

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    I'm afraid those might be a little too hot for me! Although if the rain truly dilutes the heat, maybe not!
     
    vette-kid, Oct 23, 2018
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  7. vette-kid

    Chuck

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    Excessive water causes peppers to grow fruits at a faster rate. They, more or less, outgrow their production of caspascium, a chemical in peppers that makes the heat. On the other hand if you stress the peppers into a drought simulation they will become hotter. Peppers will cross pollinate but only on next years production can you tell. In other words if you have a ghost pepper next to a banana pepper the cross pollination is not evident on this years fruits but if you plant the seeds of this year, next year the cross will be evident.
     
    Chuck, Oct 23, 2018
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  8. vette-kid

    vette-kid

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    So the question is, does a hotter pepper create more caspascium, or at a faster rate that would allow it to retain more heat when over watered?
     
    vette-kid, Oct 23, 2018
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  9. vette-kid

    Chuck

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    The hotter the pepper the longer it takes for it to reach maturity. So, the longer it takes to mature, less heat is acquired in any given amount of time. It isn't the amount of caspascium it is the purity of it that makes the heat. Some of the hottest peppers are very small so the amount isn't isn't a factor. So, if a pepper is overwatered it will grow faster, reach maturity faster and produce less caspascium in that shortened period of time. Just the opposite of being underwatered. It's hard to explain without going into the chemical properties but basically this is what happens.
     
    Chuck, Oct 23, 2018
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  10. vette-kid

    vette-kid

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    Makes sense. Essentially a Carolina reaperres the same growing conditions as my jalapenos would be just as heatless as what I have now. I was afraid of that. I'll just have to try and control the water better. It's challenging because they aren't really over watered, at least in that there are no other symptoms of such.
     
    vette-kid, Oct 23, 2018
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  11. vette-kid

    headfullofbees

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    The pepper produces the same amount of capsaicin, but it's an oil, and when there is too much water, plants evaporate off moisture including the capsaicin oil, losing the heat:


    "High moisture content of chillies creates high vapour pressure gradient across the skin of chillies leading to an increase in rate of transpiration and degradation in the physical quality of chillies in terms of physiological loss in weight "
     
    headfullofbees, Oct 23, 2018
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  12. vette-kid

    CanadianLori

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    I use pots and capillary watering. The plants suck up what they need. Yes, cross pollination can be an issue for next year's plantings so I buy new seed every couple of years so as to go back to the original strain.

    I have never grown a hot pepper that didn't have heat to it.

    I suspect your seeds were not a pure strain.
     
    CanadianLori, Oct 25, 2018
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  13. vette-kid

    vette-kid

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    This was a starter plant and the peppers were hot early in the season when it was drier.
     
    vette-kid, Oct 25, 2018
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  14. vette-kid

    CanadianLori

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    @vette-kid that is really strange. Got to admit that I have no idea what could cause them to lose their heat. I've been growing many varieties for over 18 years and yet to encounter that result. Hopefully you'll figure it out. :)
     
    CanadianLori, Oct 26, 2018
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  15. vette-kid

    La Garden

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    Jalapenos have done very good in my planter. As of late the ran has been a problem being a bit to much for a change. The peppers are just like normal jalapenos, so do not think it is the rain.
     
    La Garden, Oct 27, 2018
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  16. vette-kid

    headfullofbees

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    Planters will drain no matter how much it rains.
     
    headfullofbees, Oct 29, 2018
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  17. vette-kid

    Logan Logan

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    I have to grow my chillies inside in pots, they're carolina reeper, bhut jolocia, ghost chillies. Some others that i can't remember, but they're all very very very hot chillies. I keep them on the dry side, read that's how to make them hotter. I buy plants these days, find that seeds are very difficult for me.
     
    Logan, Dec 3, 2018
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