Help with Basil Plant

Joined
Feb 1, 2023
Messages
11
Reaction score
3
Location
New York
Country
United States
Greetings everyone,

New to gardening here. Was hoping you could help educate me on what is wrong with my basil plants. The leaves seem to be turning brown and drying out. After which they just fall off the plant. Even the newer sprouted leaves are being inflicted. I'm not sure if I'm under watering, over watering, too much uv light, not enough or if this is some sort of fungus or disease. Any insight would be appreciated.

I brought the plants in as it is winter where I am and have them under a uv light for 8 hours.
 

Attachments

  • 20230201_112746.jpg
    20230201_112746.jpg
    107.7 KB · Views: 15
  • 20230201_112727.jpg
    20230201_112727.jpg
    107.8 KB · Views: 13
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
11,496
Reaction score
5,593
Location
La Porte Texas
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Greetings everyone,

New to gardening here. Was hoping you could help educate me on what is wrong with my basil plants. The leaves seem to be turning brown and drying out. After which they just fall off the plant. Even the newer sprouted leaves are being inflicted. I'm not sure if I'm under watering, over watering, too much uv light, not enough or if this is some sort of fungus or disease. Any insight would be appreciated.

I brought the plants in as it is winter where I am and have them under a uv light for 8 hours.
I don't believe it is a lighting issue because the plants show no sign of legginess and the leaves do not look burned. They also show no sign of a nutritional issue. Also, I see no sighs of disease. It "appears" to be a watering issue or the actual water itself. Is your water chlorinated? How deep is the soil and how often do you water and how much?
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 1, 2023
Messages
11
Reaction score
3
Location
New York
Country
United States
I don't believe it is a lighting issue because the plants show no sign of legginess and the leaves do not look burned. They also show no sign of a nutritional issue. Also, I see no sighs of disease. It "appears" to be a watering issue or the actual water itself. Is your water chlorinated? How deep is the soil and how often do you water and how much?
Hi Chuck,

Thanks for the prompt response. So I've been changing up the watering times to see if anything improves. But prior to that it was being watered every 2-3 days. I've been using water that's been run through a brita filter. the soil is roughly 6 inches deep.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
11,496
Reaction score
5,593
Location
La Porte Texas
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Hi Chuck,

Thanks for the prompt response. So I've been changing up the watering times to see if anything improves. But prior to that it was being watered every 2-3 days. I've been using water that's been run through a brita filter. the soil is roughly 6 inches deep.
Basil has a robust root system and a mature plants roots will go down to 12"+. What I would do is repot into seperate containers each being a minimum of 1 gallon with fresh soil consisting of 25% manure based compost and 75% good garden soil (not cheap Miracle Grow or Scotts). Add to this about a pint of perlite. When you water, water slowly and thoroughly until water comes out of the drainage holes. I would also mulch around the base of the plant with the compost.
 
Joined
Mar 28, 2015
Messages
5,110
Reaction score
4,414
Location
Southern Chester County, PA, USA
Hardiness Zone
4 to 5 best for success.
Country
United States
Had 6 lovely ones all spring and summer out on my deck, they all got nice and tall and full. I clipped them in half and put in the oven to dry then in a jar for winter use. then let them all die out. Next year to start again. Just saying.
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2023
Messages
11
Reaction score
3
Location
New York
Country
United States
Basil has a robust root system and a mature plants roots will go down to 12"+. What I would do is repot into seperate containers each being a minimum of 1 gallon with fresh soil consisting of 25% manure based compost and 75% good garden soil (not cheap Miracle Grow or Scotts). Add to this about a pint of perlite. When you water, water slowly and thoroughly until water comes out of the drainage holes. I would also mulch around the base of the plant with the compost.
what's your take on coco coir since I was told its well draining but also somehow retains moisture. Could I sub out the perlite for this?
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2023
Messages
11
Reaction score
3
Location
New York
Country
United States
Had 6 lovely ones all spring and summer out on my deck, they all got nice and tall and full. I clipped them in half and put in the oven to dry then in a jar for winter use. then let them all die out. Next year to start again. Just saying.
Yea, I just wanted to make sure I'm learning from mistakes here so next run would be better instead of a repeat of this year's failures lol.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
11,496
Reaction score
5,593
Location
La Porte Texas
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
what's your take on coco coir since I was told its well draining but also somehow retains moisture. Could I sub out the perlite for this?
coco is good stuff but a tad expensive. It retains moisture well and like perlite contains no nutrients. It will be fine to mix in with your soil and compost.
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2021
Messages
3,459
Reaction score
2,156
Country
United Kingdom
Had 6 lovely ones all spring and summer out on my deck, they all got nice and tall and full. I clipped them in half and put in the oven to dry then in a jar for winter use. then let them all die out. Next year to start again. Just saying.

I have just potted up the seedlings from the first lot I sprouted in the propagator, they are sitting on the windowsill in the sun room now along with the first cauliflowers. I may be a bit early, but I get so many seeds I always reckon it is worth starting early and continuing with a few at regular intervals, no great loss if they don't make it, great if they do.
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2020
Messages
581
Reaction score
314
Location
Northeast Ohio
Hardiness Zone
7
Country
United States
I have the opposite problem. I can't keep up with my basil. I plant in a garden and over the course of a growing season, a 3 inch seedling can turn into a 3 foot bush! I can't trim them fast enough when they bolt.

I really need to do it in a container but that is for next year as we currently have enough dried on hand for a year.
 
Joined
Jul 18, 2022
Messages
223
Reaction score
26
Location
Newyork
Country
United States
Greetings everyone,

New to gardening here. Was hoping you could help educate me on what is wrong with my basil plants. The leaves seem to be turning brown and drying out. After which they just fall off the plant. Even the newer sprouted leaves are being inflicted. I'm not sure if I'm under watering, over watering, too much uv light, not enough or if this is some sort of fungus or disease. Any insight would be appreciated.

I brought the plants in as it is winter where I am and have them under a uv light for 8 hours.
Growing cactus from seeds can be a rewarding and fun experience, but it can also be challenging, especially for beginners. Here are some tips to help you get started:
Based on the description you provided, there are several possible reasons for the brown and dry leaves on your basil plants. Here are a few potential causes to consider:
1. Overwatering or Underwatering: Both overwatering and underwatering can cause leaves to turn brown and fall off. Overwatering can lead to root rot, which inhibits the plant's ability to absorb water, and underwatering can cause the plant to dry out.
2. Fungal or Bacterial Disease: Fungal or bacterial diseases can also cause brown, dry leaves. These diseases can be transmitted through contaminated soil, water, or even the air.
3. Pests: Basil plants are susceptible to pests such as spider mites and aphids, which can cause leaves to turn brown and die.
4. Too much or too little light: Basil plants require adequate light to grow, but too much or too little light can cause leaves to dry out and turn brown.
Based on the information provided, it's difficult to determine the exact cause of the problem. However, here are a few suggestions:
1. Check the soil moisture regularly to ensure that you're not over or under watering the plants.
2. Consider using a fungicide or bactericide to treat any fungal or bacterial diseases.
3. Inspect the plants for pests and use appropriate pest control measures if necessary.
4. Adjust the light exposure of the plant, possibly reducing the time under UV light or moving the plant to a location with a better balance of natural light.
Finally, be sure to give your basil plants proper care and attention. This includes providing them with adequate water, light, and nutrients, as well as monitoring them for signs of stress or disease.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Joined
Jul 18, 2022
Messages
223
Reaction score
26
Location
Newyork
Country
United States
Based on your description, there are several possibilities for why your basil plants are experiencing brown, dried-out leaves that fall off. Here are a few potential causes to consider:
  1. Overwatering: If the soil is consistently wet and the roots are not getting enough oxygen, this can cause the leaves to turn brown and drop. Make sure that you're allowing the soil to dry out slightly between waterings and that there's proper drainage in the pot.
  2. Underwatering: On the other hand, if the soil is too dry, the leaves can also turn brown and fall off. Make sure that you're watering your plants enough so that the soil doesn't completely dry out.
  3. Lack of humidity: If the air around your plants is too dry, this can cause the leaves to dry out and turn brown. Try misting the plants with water or placing a tray of water nearby to increase humidity.
  4. Fungal or bacterial disease: There are several diseases that can affect basil plants, including Fusarium wilt and downy mildew. These can cause brown, wilted leaves and may require treatment with a fungicide. Make sure to remove any infected leaves to prevent the disease from spreading.
  5. UV light damage: While basil plants need plenty of light, too much UV light can also damage the leaves and cause them to turn brown. Make sure that your UV light is not too close to the plants and that they're getting a balance of UV and visible light.
In general, it's a good idea to monitor your plants closely and make adjustments to watering, lighting, and other factors as needed. Good luck with your basil plants!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Members online

No members online now.

Forum statistics

Threads
27,010
Messages
259,621
Members
13,452
Latest member
tabby

Latest Threads

Top