Help! What's wrong with my jasmine plant?


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Previously thriving jasmine plant that has been looking worse and worse over the past couple of months. The branches are turning brown from the bottom, moving up the plant. However, there is still a solid, healthy green branch that does not seem to be affected. The texture and color of the leaves that have not turned brown and fallen off is changing.There is no evidence of pests, and it doesn't seem to help when I adjust my watering frequency. I would welcome any and all of your ideas. I love this plant and I don't want it to die.
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alp

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Jasmine/RHS Gardening
https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=291
Cultivation notes. All jasmines need a fertile, well-drained soil in full or partial sun. Summer jasmine needs a sheltered spot, full sun and a south- or south west-facing aspect. Winter jasmine is more tolerant of partial shade and a south east or north west aspect.

Curly leaves
Leaf Curls in Jasmine | Home Guides | SF Gate
homeguides.sfgate.com › Garden › Pest Control
Although hardy plants, jasmine leaves can begin to curl when suffering from disease or pests. Roots. Jasmine plants can suffer from root rot if the soil doesn't drain properly. Leaf Fungi. Several types of fungus can find a home on jasmine's leaves, causing them to curl and discolor. Pests. Treatments.

Have a look to see if there are any bugs please.

Why are the leaves falling off my jasmine plant?
This can cause leaves to dry up and fall off. Too much water can be just as bad for your plant. ... The difference in this instance is that the leaves will turn yellow before dropping off, much like tree leaves changing colors before falling. Lack of light can be another cause of jasmine plants losing leaves.

I don't think you need to put the plant behind the blinds as that spot looks not very bright. I have no idea when you took the photo though.

It might be a good idea to use a bit of cotton wool to clean the front and back of the leaves, look for scales or bugs and you can top up you soil with sand if there are bugs. Bugs don't like cool sand, but love moist and warm compost. See if you can disentangle the stems and layer one of them. That way, you might have another stem providing nutrients to the plant or a new plant if the mother plant dies. When's the last time you topped up or changed the compost please?
 
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Thank you for your thorough reply! Regarding sunlight, my plant does get full sun from a south-facing window (it was just behind the blinds for the sake of the picture).

In terms of bugs, I have searched and did not see any. Other than the overt presence of bugs and holes in the leaves, are there covert signs I should be looking for that would suggest bugs/pests?

I most recently changed the compost in June. Would it be wise to change it again now?

What exactly do you mean by layering the stems after I disentangle them? I like the idea of preserving one of them in the event that the rest of the plant dies, but want to be sure I'm doing it correctly.
 
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alp

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Layering is very easy. That's how I got my winter jasmine.

How to layer plants


There are several methods of layering that can be used. Here are the details for four of the most common.

Simple layering
This technique works well for shrubs with shoots that can be bent down to ground level.

  • Choose flexible young shoots on the outside of the plant that can be bent down to ground level
  • Mark the point where the shoot touches the ground with a bamboo cane
  • About 30cm (1ft) from the shoot tip, make a 2.5-5cm (1-2in) incision along the stem, running through a leaf bud (remove the leaf first if the plant is in leaf). This will create a wedge that is propped open with a small piece of wood
  • Apply hormone rooting compound to the surfaces of the wound
  • Make a shallow trench in the soil, 10-15cm (4-6in) deep, back from the bamboo cane towards the parent plant
  • Peg the wounded section of stem into the trench with a loop of thick wire
  • Secure the tip of the shoot to the bamboo cane, so that it is growing upwards
  • Fill up the trench with soil, firm in and water if dry
Roots should develop within 12 months. When a good root system has formed, sever the layer from the parent plant and transplant to its final position, or into a pot for growing on.

Tip layering
This technique works well for blackberries and hybrid berries.

  • In mid- to late spring, choose a long arching stem that easily reaches ground level
  • Bury the tip of the shoot 7.5cm (3in) under the surface of the soil. Peg it down (if necessary) with a loop of thick wire. Water if dry
Roots should develop from the shoot tip by the following autumn or spring.

Source https://www.gardening-forums.com/threads/help-whats-wrong-with-my-jasmine-plant.13445/#post-134390

It is always a good idea to layer clematis, jasmine, ivy, whenever you buy one. That way, you can always have an heir and a spare or two.
 

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