Hello from Denmark


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I for one wish you good luck and hope that all will be well. We will have to put our heads together and help you dream up a nice bog garden :)


I found this link for you - an article by our Alan Titchmarsh that you may enjoy reading.
 
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Thank you, you are lovely!
I am looking so much forwards to project garden and am happy help is at hand, since I've never tried it before. So no doubt I'll have questions! I will also get some gardening books. Lots to learn!
It will be hard to wait, while getting to know the garden, when so excited to start! I figure I can start getting willows, to line the edge of the garden reasonably soon? I really want the garden made more private and they'll take some time to grow. My plan is coppiced/pollarded willows, people sound like that would work. As you can see from the pictures, the garden is completely open to the street, and tricky to close off due to the slope to the street, so one feels very exposed.
Judging by the headline that article sounds spot on. I will read it right away.
 
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I think "Unimaginable" is a bit strong, I have seen the river Rother at Bodiam rise by that sort of amount after prolonged rain and make me go around another way when we used to live near there. The important factor to me would be are you downstream or upstream from the bridge? That could be a sort of pinch point, where only so much water can go under it. Having said that, the bridge at Bodiam is a medieval arched bridge, that looks like a modern bridge with far more space under it. Downstream from the bridge even if the water builds up. enough to come over the road and embankment it will quickly return to the watercourse.
I would call it a river, are there fish in it?
 
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Sorry, posted and then read your post.
Willows don't take that long, I remember years ago telling my father about a book on propagation. Most things wanted about a nine inch cutting of about pencil thickness, willow they said make a hole with a crowbar for a cutting about an inch thick and six feet long. Dad smiled and then said "Yes, and then step back."
However, if you are thinking 'privacy' it might be worth incorporating some evergreens as well. You are mostly in the garden in Summer, but not only. Growing rambling roses, or something similar, through them can have a strong deterrent effect on intruders.
It is worth checking out the oversize books in charity shops for gardening books. Gardening and cookery seem to be very over represented there, they are continually being 'updated', but mostly it is in the presentation, the actual information does not change all that much and you can get for pennies what can cost a fortune.
 
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I think "Unimaginable" is a bit strong, I have seen the river Rother at Bodiam rise by that sort of amount after prolonged rain and make me go around another way when we used to live near there. The important factor to me would be are you downstream or upstream from the bridge? That could be a sort of pinch point, where only so much water can go under it. Having said that, the bridge at Bodiam is a medieval arched bridge, that looks like a modern bridge with far more space under it. Downstream from the bridge even if the water builds up. enough to come over the road and embankment it will quickly return to the watercourse.
I would call it a river, are there fish in it?
Hmmm. The house is upstream from it. I am really worried. It's a house that don't come around often, so we're very eager to get it, but it would also be terrible with flooding! I wonder if there are steps that can be taken to prevent the house from flooding, should the water rise high enough. That aren't incredibly expensive (there are things that can be put all the way around the house that rise up like a wall if water comes up, but they are very expensive). It's also a problem that the ground water is too high for normal draining methods, like a fascine.
There are barriers that can attach to doors and go up if water comes up to there, but I don't know if it's enough to block doors?
I really don't know what to do!
I don't know if there's fish in it.
 
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Sorry, posted and then read your post.
Willows don't take that long, I remember years ago telling my father about a book on propagation. Most things wanted about a nine inch cutting of about pencil thickness, willow they said make a hole with a crowbar for a cutting about an inch thick and six feet long. Dad smiled and then said "Yes, and then step back."
However, if you are thinking 'privacy' it might be worth incorporating some evergreens as well. You are mostly in the garden in Summer, but not only. Growing rambling roses, or something similar, through them can have a strong deterrent effect on intruders.
It is worth checking out the oversize books in charity shops for gardening books. Gardening and cookery seem to be very over represented there, they are continually being 'updated', but mostly it is in the presentation, the actual information does not change all that much and you can get for pennies what can cost a fortune.
I didn't really understand the first part I'm afraid, after "Willows don't take that long...".
Anyway, it makes sense with some evergreen in there. Roses are pretty and smell amazing! We're not worried about intruders too much, it's more that people can look straight into the garden. The edge of the lot is at the foot of the slope down from the street with the bridge, so it takes something tall to block the view. Still, roses would look beautiful in it between the willow branches!

It's a really good idea to go to a used book store to look for gardening books! Books aren't cheap and saving money is always good.
 
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I will try to explain.
My father had a first class degree in agriculture and was a very knowledgeable gardener.
I had been reading a book about propagation, the various ways of increasing numbers of a plant.
I told my father about the section in the book which was about taking cuttings.
With most things you take a piece about the size of a pencil round and about 20cm long.
With willow you take a piece a bit thicker than your thumb and about two meters long.
Make a hole in the ground with a crowbar about 80cm deep and put it in.
My father said "And stand back", meaning it will grow so fast it might knock you over, a very English sort of joke maybe.

Partly it is that you use such good English I simply prattle on, I must remember not to be obscure :)
 
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Aaaaah, then I get it. I know it takes a bit out of a joke to have to explain it, but it was funny! :D
I understand most English prattle I think. It's easier to understand American prattle than English-English :ROFLMAO: (due to exposure no doubt). However, hoping not to get my English entirely "Americanised" I enjoy trying to pick up British expressions, so prattle on ;) (Disclaimer: No offense meant to Americans of course, we just happen to be neighbours to the UK, hence the wish to say 'cheers' in stead of 'thanks', call crisps 'crisps' and use some of the funniest expletives in the entire English language).
Also, as you can tell, I have a tendency to prattle on myself! :X3:
 
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That looks stunning! That's exactly what I would love to have. Lush, green, beautiful flowers, natural looking. A peaceful little paradise.
I couldn't help myself a couple of gardening books yesterday. English. Today I'm going to the used book store to look for Danish ones. I can dream and read until I can start creating my paradise next spring, when I know the garden space properly.
 
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It is always best to take notice of more local garden advice. There can be a big problem of not understanding local conditions and local plants especially on a forum like this one. People seem to use this forum from all over the world, which can make it quite a puzzle. Language can be an obstacle - as in the English/American one you have already mentioned :giggle:
Some things, of course are universal, but the geographical differences as well as mannerisms - oh, and sense of humour (or lack of it) are sometimes a right old pain.
 
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Yes, one would think it was obvious that what can grow well in one part of the world cannot necessarily do so in other parts of the world. When the time comes I think I'll also have a chat with a local gardener. And I'll read Danish garden books too, because English ones aren't aimed at Danish conditions.
Do you think that conditions in large parts of England are similar enough to Denmark that you guys can give realistic advice, including on plant choices too? For instance, a soggy garden in England is close enough to a soggy garden in Denmark?
 
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....so prattle on ;) (Disclaimer: No offense meant to Americans of course, we just happen to be neighbours to the UK, hence the wish to say 'cheers' in stead of 'thanks', call crisps 'crisps' and use some of the funniest expletives in the entire English language).
Also, as you can tell, I have a tendency to prattle on myself! :X3:
Don't worry about us Americans, we're use to being offended;)
 
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Yes, one would think it was obvious that what can grow well in one part of the world cannot necessarily do so in other parts of the world. When the time comes I think I'll also have a chat with a local gardener. And I'll read Danish garden books too, because English ones aren't aimed at Danish conditions.
Do you think that conditions in large parts of England are similar enough to Denmark that you guys can give realistic advice, including on plant choices too? For instance, a soggy garden in England is close enough to a soggy garden in Denmark?
Yep, you are quite right, and soggy is soggy wherever the soggy weather happens and at whatever time. This week in the UK - it is quite soggy. The sog keeps falling and we are not getting our fair share of the sunshine, in fact it is nearly as soggy as soggy Wales o_O and let me tell you, Wales is always soggy. They tell me the sheep there have to wear wellington boots !!


Most of you don't deserve it. ;)
BUT... some of them do! However, I am pleased to say that roadrunner is usually quite good :playful:
 
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Yep, you are quite right, and soggy is soggy wherever the soggy weather happens and at whatever time. This week in the UK - it is quite soggy. The sog keeps falling and we are not getting our fair share of the sunshine, in fact it is nearly as soggy as soggy Wales o_O and let me tell you, Wales is always soggy. They tell me the sheep there have to wear wellington boots !!
:ROFLMAO: That sogs! We've had a record-breakingly wet month too. I'm not impressed. Our cows are using umbrellas.
 
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Hello and welcome to the forums @LadyDay you don't have to worry about your English because i can't find anything wrong with it.
It's good that your land slopes down into the creek, so you won't get any flooding in your house hopefully.

If it's always wet it's best to find some plants that like that sort of thing, you will have to find out what type of soil that you've got before you plant anything.
Take your time to decide what you want but you can always change it. We've changed ours over the years.
Have fun doing it.
 
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Hello and welcome to the forums @LadyDay you don't have to worry about your English because i can't find anything wrong with it.
It's good that your land slopes down into the creek, so you won't get any flooding in your house hopefully.

If it's always wet it's best to find some plants that like that sort of thing, you will have to find out what type of soil that you've got before you plant anything.
Take your time to decide what you want but you can always change it. We've changed ours over the years.
Have fun doing it.
Thank you for the welcome.
I definitely hope it's possible to find plants that are happy with the conditions. We have to find out exactly how wet different parts of the garden are and when and how much shade the trees cast once they have leaves and the sun is out. Judging by Google, the number of plants that are happy with both wet soil and shade half the day is limited. But there seems to be some, like some ferns and irises. I love both!
Is there a trick to finding out what type of soil one has?
My plan of attack is to watch the garden carefully until next spring, read a bunch of books and with the help of the books and the internet (asking a lot of questions of you lot ;) ) plan the garden out on paper, which plants and where to put them. Then start out simple and work my way up. I expect there will be changes along the way, as I learn more. I don't expect to be able to create paradise on earth right out the gate. But I'm sure that's part of the fun, letting the garden evolve along the way.
I am also lucky to have a mother and a mother in law who are both excellent at gardening, which can come in handy for someone who barely knows how to use a hoe!
It's going to be a fun project!
 

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Your welcome
I agree with what your plan is going to be and that's great.
You can get soil test kits to help you understand your soil, should be able to get them from a garden centre or from Amazon.
 
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Your welcome
I agree with what your plan is going to be and that's great.
You can get soil test kits to help you understand your soil, should be able to get them from a garden center or from Amazon.
Thanks for the advice. I will figure it out.
 

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