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Hey guys just bought a new house in Omaha Nebraska and setting up a garden. The area I’m setting it up in had a bunch of saplings weeds stuff like that growing up. It had a dead evergreen tree that we cut down and had the stump ground out. I have a feeling the soil their is junk. I was going to bring in some topsoil and compost mix. Just wondering what the going rate is for that? The place I found wants 43.95 a cubic yard. Seems steep to me. Is a two inch depth deep enough? I was going to add some leaves this fall also. Should I dig those into the topsoil and compost mix? Thanks.
 
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Few things come to mind:
1) have a soil test done - I think these commonly run about $20
2) dig some holes to get an idea of what the soil is like - how much top soil, what is the sub soil...
3) run a "jar" test with what you dug up - https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/soil-texture-analysis-the-jar-test/


$44 a yard sounds high unless that is with delivery. If I drive up to the local place with a trailer or pickup it is $25 a yard for screened top soil or compost blend. When I was having crushed lime or mulch delivered it was something like $100 delivery charge for the 10 yard truck - but that was 5 to 10 years ago.
 
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I’m starting to think I might be better off going with raised beds? No that’s not with delivery. They want an additional 65 dollars for delivery. Or for 29.95 I can rent a dump trailer from them for 2 hours.
 
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I’m starting to think I might be better off going with raised beds? No that’s not with delivery. They want an additional 65 dollars for delivery. Or for 29.95 I can rent a dump trailer from them for 2 hours.
No way to know. What drainage test have you done?
 
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I haven’t yet but based on the ground I’m thinking raised beds would be best. I’m waiting to hear back from my extension office if they do soil testing. I’m pretty sure that dirt their is junk soil.
 
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I haven’t yet but based on the ground I’m thinking raised beds would be best. I’m waiting to hear back from my extension office if they do soil testing. I’m pretty sure that dirt their is junk soil.
LOL careful, dirt is heavy and a lot of work if you fail to respect it and give it a slight nod of the hat.
 
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I would lean toward raised beds based on my experience.
1) I find them easier and more conducive to my style of veg gardening.
2) A few raised beds with defined side walls (not mounds) are less likely to change the flow of water around the yard and create drainage problems.

I caused a big problem with drainage when I changed the slope of my yard and caused water to pool near the foundation.

@Brian1985, @DirtMechanic is right test your drainage. How fast does the soil percolate? The test I am used to hearing about has you dig a 1'x1'x1' hole, fill that with water and let it drain, fill it again with water and let it drain, fill it a third time and time it for how long it takes to drain. This website outlines drainage testing - https://todayshomeowner.com/diy-soil-drainage-perk-test-for-your-yard/

If you're not really careful I see bringing in soil as leading to problems.
 
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Here in the UK, you are likely to pay twice that for topsoil.
Don't dig the leaves in, scatter them on top; worms will take them down & they'll be castings by the time they get there.
Raised beds can be expensive to fill & may take a year or two to get to their best if you go organics.
 

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