Cold hardy tropicals, zone 8a


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So we are trying to go for a somewhat tropical look in our backyard. We were told by the local nursery that Sagos would do okay here, however that did not appear to be the case. The ones pictures below perished during the winter this year.

Are there any other similar sized tropical/'palmy' looking plants that could work as a substitute?

Is there any possible way to keep them alive over the winter? Our weather isn't TOO terribly cold, but once in while it will dip into the 20s for a few days. Unfortunately had a really bad week this year.
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alp

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Common name Hardy palms
Botanical name Various: Chamaerops, Jubaea, Trachycarpus Will tolerate up to -12c

Sabal minor (dwarf palmetto): Slow, low-growing fan palm to 60cm (2ft) with large stiff blue-green leaves. Cold tolerant to -12°C (10°F),

Jubaea chilensis (Chilean wine palm): Hardy to about -14°C (7°F),

Chamaerops humilis (dwarf fan palm) AGM: Forms clumps of fan-shaped leaves, up to to 2m (6½ft) tall. It is wind resistant and will tolerate -12°C (10°F) or lower.

Trachycarpus fortunei (Chusan palm) AGM: Large fan-shaped leaves. Good rate of growth. Withstands temperatures of -15°C (5°F) or below if sheltered.

Trithrinax campestris (Caranday palm): Fan-shaped, blue-green, wind resistant leaves. Slow growing; the trunk may grow to 5m (16ft). Very hardy to about -12°C (10°F). Easy to grow.

Hope it helps.
 
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I am surprised your sagos had problems. We are 8b/9a (border) and there are TONS of them around here.
 

alp

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Hibiscus is one of my favorite and you can easily take cuttings. See if you have friends who have them. They take very easily and the single yellow, blue and white ones are big and bold and beautiful. As they are hardy, they are really an assets to any garden. Another beauty is Alstroemerias. They are hardy until -12c. Nevertheless they are long flowering.
 
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I've actually been seriously considering Hibiscus too!

Question though, I have zero experience with them, I know they go dormant over the winter, do they stay above ground and just stop producing flowers, or completely go away until it warms up again? That will help decide the best placement for them in my set-up.
 
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I've actually been seriously considering Hibiscus too!

Question though, I have zero experience with them, I know they go dormant over the winter, do they stay above ground and just stop producing flowers, or completely go away until it warms up again? That will help decide the best placement for them in my set-up.
I had several Rose of Sharron at our old house. They just turned bare, but grew new leaves on the branches in spring. Come to think of it, I should go over and get a few cuttings while we still own that place!

I THINK Rose of Sharron is the same as hardy hibiscus. Although mine weren't as large, they were still 6 inch blooms.
 
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I have several rose of sharon trees and their habit mimics the fruit trees in that they go bare branch and emerge about the end of Feb or beginning of march. They are beginning to flower now.
 

alp

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I should go over and get a few cuttings while we still own that place!
Good idea! People pay good money for them. They go bare in winter. Like an upturn brolly. Not very nice. But they are definitely an asset. They can very easily be raised from seeds, too. So pick the seeds if they see them. Don't worry about the frost. I had hard frost, but the dahlia seeds still germinated.
 
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I
Good idea! People pay good money for them. They go bare in winter. Like an upturn brolly. Not very nice. But they are definitely an asset. They can very easily be raised from seeds, too. So pick the seeds if they see them. Don't worry about the frost. I had hard frost, but the dahlia seeds still germinated.
Don't this there are any blooms yet. Just starting to green up when I was over there last week. Anything special to propagating with cuttings? Just snip a branch and plant?
 
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alp

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Many ways to skin a rabbit



Take your pick!
 

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